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For Those Countries That Use The English Language. A Question.

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posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 09:02 AM
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This is aimed at members who live in countries such as Australia, New Zealand, The U.S. Canada etc.

The above and other countries have adopted the English language. Would you prefer to have your own distinct language ?
To me, language is part of a countries identity. Having to use a language from elsewhere takes part of that identity away.

Thoughts ?




posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 09:20 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong

In a way, we do. Between dialect and accent there is plenty of variation in the English language.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 09:20 AM
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Have you ever heard Newfanese? You get 2 Newfies talking English and you can't understand a word. Think Mickey in Snatch.
Living on Canada's east coast most of my life I understood damn near every word.


+2 more 
posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 09:24 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong
But we already speak different languages. You just havent noticed.
English: "Where can I find the bathroom?"

Australian: "Wheredun chazzwozzers didgeridoo vegemite loodunny, ya bogan?"
Canadian: "I had too many Molsons and need to drop my kids off at the pool, eh"
New Zealand: "tur- im rad- i chil na i throne, Aragorn"
US: "Where's the pisser in this communist #hole?"



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 09:38 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong

It's all cool, I'm English and I understand that it's just a bastardisation of other languages, maybe that's too strong of a word?

I don't know but English is an ever evolving language, it changes from region to region in the UK and the same trend happens internationally too.

Language definitely helps define a nation though, there's some good studies on the subject. How linguistics or even dialect can alter a person's brain and the likes.

I wonder if we'll still call it English in 1000 years time.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 09:39 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong

Your language does not define your personal identity. As an individual, you just conform your thoughts to a certain language. Language can help create a group identity, but that's all it does.

It is a means of communication, not an ensemble of intended meanings.
edit on 2 1 2018 by surnamename57 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong

"s'doow eth ni tihs raeb a seod?" I hope that clears that up.

Many nations have their own unique version of the English language and I't's great, however there are many native nations out there have different languages, the Sioux word for coyote could be different from the one that the Cherokee uses.

I like to think rhyming slang should be it's own language but I don't think that would take off, If an Aussie told you he was sitting on his Pat Malone and saw a Joe Blake and then did the Harold Holt, people would think you have had a stroke, but in Australian that would mean "I was sitting alone and saw a snake then I ran like hell."



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: Thecakeisalie




If an Aussie told you he was sitting on his Pat Malone and saw a Joe Blake and then did the Harold Holt


However, that is still using words from the English language.

Get my drift ?



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 10:01 AM
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Often I'm saddened that my great grandfather forbade my papa and his mom and sisters to speak Ojibwemowin. My papa was only able to teach me a minimal ammount and the rest I have been learning online with other Ojibwe friends and teachers I've met. I think it would be beautiful if the many Native Dialects were still primarily spoken however I understand how confusing that gets. The Philippines have many different languages and dialects also which can make travel there difficult.

So yes and no. Sadly? Is that the right word, sadly? I'm comfortable with the colonization of language here. Perhaps because I was born in an English speaking house hold. I learned Spanish, I can read some Hangul, I am learning some Mandarin, and Russian, but......

Yes it's nice to dream of a world where our ancestors native languages remained strong and commonly used.

Now perhaps not everyone can say that, clearly a lot of peoples ancestors came from England, Ireland, etc.. etc... As did some of mine- but my Ojibwe ancestors I feel were robbed of their importance and cast aside, trampled over by history, and the other half of my heritage.

-Alee



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 10:09 AM
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a reply to: NerdGoddess

Melancholy came over me as i read your post.




posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 10:13 AM
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I hate to say it but us 'orrible English invaded/settled those lands so the language spoken was English and any native peoples were forced to speak it but if it wasn't us, it would have been the French, Spanish or Portuguese or many others forcing there languages on other people.
The Americans like to say they speak American but if they spoke American they'd be speaking native American and not an English derivative. We English bought a lot of bad but also some good.
Welsh is making a big come back now but a lot of English dialects are dying out like cockney slang and such.


edit on 2-1-2018 by Kurokage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 10:26 AM
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I really just had to.






posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 10:36 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong

Canada here and personally using English as a main language today , I can only reflect back when French was a main other language in my life and eagerly waiting to learn a 3rd ( Mi'kmaq / native ) ... Unfortunately it had only been a empty promise made and I was bitter over it . This made me question the all about school and education thing . The more I questioned the less I found of substance ie. the history books were a mess and geography and cultures seemed to be at odds with reality .

I chose to finally stick all my eggs in the English basket and try my best with it . I find today that the English language is a moving target and communications can be a big challenge without clearly defining word meanings .A layer to this language is context of course so it requires the mind to be mindful of that and to expand to the differing genre's being used .

In a way I wished I had kept using French because if you don't use it you loose it . But it is what it is .
edit on 2-1-2018 by the2ofusr1
because: (no reason given)
eta a good example I have used and found to be a good lesson with why the diffrent Bible versions is this short vid that should cause a grin from other English speaking parts

edit on 2-1-2018 by the2ofusr1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 10:38 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong

English? Strine's the local lingo here in Oz, been that way since Ned Kelly was an ankle biter.

I'd stay and chinwag but a bloke's been flat out like a lizard drinking an' the ol' throat's as dry as a dead dingo's donger, so I'm gonna grab a coldie from the fridge an get rotten as a chop before the trouble and strife gets home.

Translation:

Australians have had their own way with words for quite some time.

I would stay and chat but it has been a busy day and I am thirsty so I shall have a beer or two before my wife gets home.


Recommended reading for potential new Australians is this comprehensive guide.

See also the well known documentary on Australian culture The Adventures of Barry McKenzie available on DVD.

'ave a bonzer day mate! Chugalug!





edit on 2-1-2018 by Whatsthisthen because: typos



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 10:41 AM
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Damn you and your upward inflections.




a reply to: Whatsthisthen




posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 10:52 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong

I think every local area has it's own distinct dialect, accents, idioms. It doesn't matter which language is the mother tongue.

Language is a living thing though, it evolves and takes on new identity based upon it's usage and the people using it, as well as popular idioms and slang.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 10:53 AM
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a reply to: CulturalResilience

grin



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 10:55 AM
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a reply to: Whatsthisthen

A lot of what you've posted is very similar and some of it is exactly the same as Cockney rhyming slang, which is a lot older and a possible basis for your Auzzie "strine" mixed with your local lingo.





edit on 2-1-2018 by Kurokage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 11:00 AM
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a reply to: Kurokage

Yeah, it is at that, personally I think the rhyming slang was one of the better things we inherited from 'ol mother England.

Don't hear it much any more.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 11:01 AM
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originally posted by: alldaylong
This is aimed at members who live in countries such as Australia, New Zealand, The U.S. Canada etc.

The above and other countries have adopted the English language. Would you prefer to have your own distinct language ?
To me, language is part of a countries identity. Having to use a language from elsewhere takes part of that identity away.

Thoughts ?


Nah I think it's cool.
Plus I can't understand half of what aussies, Irish or south Africans say anyway lol..

May as well be another language sometimes.

Most people online speak in english. Makes it easy for me.





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