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For Those Countries That Use The English Language. A Question.

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posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 02:49 PM
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originally posted by: RAY1990
The future is emojis and maybe the occasional grunt or pointing finger.

In other words, a drastically reduced vocabulary, less capable of communicating subtle or complicated concepts.
I believe you.




posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: alldaylong

I love english. In all its iterations. I love the different accents from around the globe.
Heck even different regions within the same country have different accents.
I'm not sure which is my favorite.
I love the original but I also love the Irish and Scottish accents.
I love a soft southern accent and my own New York accent. Even in N.Y. different regions have different accents. Only a New Yorker would probably know the difference from someone from Columbia county and someone from Suffolk county or someone from queens from someone from brooklyn. I wonder if people outside the USA know that we don't all sound like they do in California.
If you speak English as your language what is your accent?



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 03:05 PM
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a reply to: Sillyolme
Here is a little test of your knowledge of accents.
I was brought up in a part of England where "go" is pronounced "goo".
I always prided myself in not saying "goo".
So I was a little shocked to be informed, in later years, that I do say "goo-ing".
Could you identify the area?



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: intrepid

No. I met a young man from Toronto in NYC one summer in the late seventies. His name was Wolfgang. He was ummm agressive. Lumber jack sized and handsome. I remember he said aboot for about but didn't really notice a hugh difference. He didn't struggle with English and sometimes sounded softly french.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990

No it's not too harsh.
English was the language of the surfs. The aristocracy all spoke french through the 1500s.
Ireland and Scotland had different languages from england.
English is the language of the people who really built the empire.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 04:37 PM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI

originally posted by: RAY1990
The future is emojis and maybe the occasional grunt or pointing finger.

In other words, a drastically reduced vocabulary, less capable of communicating subtle or complicated concepts.
I believe you.


Maybe.

For all we know our concept of communication could change drastically in the future.

At one point man evolved complex writing but the brain still had the potential to realise advanced linguistics, we'll always have a brain susceptible to communication. Regardless of the form it comes in.

1000's of years ago we painted pictures to convey messages across time or languages, the recipient always had to work out what was meant by the artist.

In more recent history we have mistranslations and people who can't grasp the intent of the writer even though they speak the same language.

Today we have emojis, tbh I truly do struggle with them and it's a concept of communication associated with my age group.

What might seem simple can be extremely complex, I know cave painters were just as capable as modern humans and their intent wasn't to make pretty pictures or to be cool. It was to communicate.

Intent will always be a priority in communication and until we become psychic we will always have flaws in our methods, it's inevitable. I mean, the Greeks and Romans did OK didn't they?

The hieroglyphic concept was all but forgotten to the West, we still used pictures and we still communicated effectively whilst keeping records and all those other good things associated with language and civilisation.

Methods can be different.

Vocabulary needn't be the epitome of human communication. In fact it can be overly complex when conveying certain messages.

Ultimately it will always be down to the recipient to understand intent. Either way you look at it a human must use his/her brain to communicate.

Ritual. You could use a million words to describe a ritual and never touch on the intent. That's the kind of thing I'm trying to explain, I know I'm doing it poorly though.

Emojis might well be the future, even if they are just silly pictures to you or me.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

Probably not but if I were to guess I'd say north. I had a friend from Liverpool and she pronounced to not quite goo but not quite go either. It kind of slid out out one and into the other like Irish but not. Lol boy I'm so not good at this.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 04:53 PM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

I always figured the modern English language was the language of an empire.

I live in a region with a "dodgy" accent, foreigners call us Scottish, British call us Geordies. We've still got a load of "auld" words but the majority are extinct or used in a cultural aspect... English was always a fluid language. My ancestors English wasn't the same as someone from say Dover.

I'm pretty sure that was a purposeful action, uniting the English tongue under a British one.

Language assimilation has been practised in the UK for a long time, some words stay but most don't. It's not dissimilar elsewhere either.

You can change or be left behind, I've always seen the English language as a one of conquest.




I wonder if we'll still call it English in 1000 years time.


I wasn't joking about that, we've been infiltrated!




posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 04:54 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990




n more recent history we have mistranslations and people who can't grasp the intent of the writer even though they speak the same language


You have just defined the relationship I have with my kindle spell check in words that until now have escaped me. Much obliged.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 04:59 PM
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This was one of the most interesting series I ever stumbled on.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 05:01 PM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

Scouse is like a bastard bastard language/accent.

Anyone who isn't British could get easily confused, kinda like NYC?

Basically the scouse accent is a mix of many accents that's evolved into it's own.

Eyup Disraeli?

I'm not sure, I'm probably garn down the wrang street aneewaeys... You never lose your accent no matter how much you think you have.

Unless you're a flawless actor.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 05:04 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990

I tried on groovy once but found it didn't suit me. I did say far out. I'm aging myself but the British invasion invaded my teenage girl bedroom. You're right that language evolves. Neither of us says tis or thee and thou or can relate to Shakespearean English but the two phrases above that were popular and hip in the seventies sound archaic now and that wasn't so long ago. Gnarly and other California speak came and went but we kept totally and awesome because they're totally awesome words. We've adapted new words like cyber and nano and changed nouns into verbs like party and changed meanings of words like gay and that's in my lifetime. This is another reason I love english. It's never done cooking.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 05:05 PM
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a reply to: alldaylong



Would you prefer to have your own distinct language ?

Nope. My ideal world would have one universal language that everyone on the planet is fluent in (with other languages for their own regions, homes, etc). English has the potential to become that universal language.

Also, there are many English speaking countries, but that doesn't mean that our dialects are equally understood. Compare some of the southern American dialects, rural UK dialects, and the Western African pidgin English dialects. They might as well be different languages. (Though to be fair, American English and West African pidgin English have added a lot of words & phrases from other languages).



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 05:16 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990
I was brought up close to this guy, who was Norfolk.
We were one county further west (Isle of Ely), so the "oo" was definitely stronger.





edit on 2-1-2018 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 05:19 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990


It depend's, I am a scouser but take someone from skelmersdale outside of Liverpool also known as plastic scousers, they often accentuate it so that they sound like someone from the rough side of Bootle but even more severe were as if you listen to most ordinary Liverpool folk you will find them perfectly legible, like any city there are degree's of severity and some like to accentuate the rolling R's and miss out the letter S so Right become Rrrright and Yes become Yeah, you become Ye and then another peculiarity of many with a liverpool background is NO damnedspacedbetweentheword'swhentheyspeak which leave's even the listener out of breath and they tend to speak very quickly as well almost as if they are trying to get the whole sentence out in a single breath.

It is actually correct to point out that Liverpool has a mixed heritage, the oldest china town in the western world was founded there, Irish migrant's, Scot's, Welsh (it is on the border of wales more or less anyway) and being the Actual most important port in the nation for a long time or at least on a par with London (Cockney now there is another one and Cockney riming slang really is it's own language) a lot of foreign sailors came through and added there own flavour.

Scouse the dish of Liverpool (if you can call it that) is actually a Norwegian dish in origin and is called Scoose, potatoes, meat and vegetables all boiled into a grey paste in a pot but of course every family does it different and it is not all lumpy wall paper paste and you can actually find dream like scouse made by some family's that is wonderful to taste.

Over in Wigan were they are despite there hatred of Liverpool tied by blood to Liverpool they have another dialect and in part's it is so extreme that it make's the worst scouse sound positively genteel by comparison, to differentiate they called there Scouse Hot Pot and put a pastry lid on it instead of the usual dumpling's you will often find in Liverpool.

edit on 2-1-2018 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 05:39 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

Cheers


I genuinely enjoyed listening to those, I can struggle when people write in an accent sometimes so it's always easier to hear it.

Folk music... It's getting a lot rarer to hear a person's accent when they perform, something I truly appreciate



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 06:33 PM
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a reply to: LABTECH767

Definitely a dumpling kind of guy myself, I once had the pleasure of drinking with a few gypsies that lived around Wigan when on holiday... I just nodded for about two hours. I know what you mean about variation in accent though, it's the same where I live, I'm guessing education and schooling plays a part in it, some of it is definitely cultural identity so I get what you mean.

Port towns were always a little more accepting of Mr Foreigner, my hometown used to have a big Jewish settlement, something remembered in the form if mascots these days... When it came to ships though we mainly just made them, you'd take them. Not exactly a hub of commerce but a lot of trading went through it back in the day.

Panackelty was a firm favourite of mine as a kid, I always thought it was written panacke? Anyways, unless you get UNESCO to recognise it you'll always have others pinching your dish, changing it a bit and labelling it as their own.

The local brewery (closed now) used to make a rival ale to the famous one, Newcastle Brown ale. It was called double maxim. Well we couldn't drink geordie bath water could we?

Maxim still produces ales, the recipes were bought up... The only original Brown Ale to be produced in the NE
The brewery does tours.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 06:35 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990

Yeah. The little subtleties like pronouncing dog dawg with the aw more like or. Or water warder ward with er on the end. It's hard to write accents. Long island was Lawn guy lind. And we incorporated a lot of Yiddish and German words in the New York lexicon.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 06:37 PM
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a reply to: RAY1990

See there ..that's a regional word. You go on holiday. We go on vacation. You go in hospital we go to the hospital. You use the lift we take the elevator.



posted on Jan, 2 2018 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: Kurokage

The same thing is happening here. My niece has an American accent she brought back from a visit there. A "Valley" accent, I think they call it. Americanism has taken it's toll on TV watching aussie kids.

There is also the influx of foreign cultures swamping the country.

Something they call "progress".



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