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The 'Complete' Nexus of the Cold War - CIA Drug Trafficking - the War on Terror

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posted on Dec, 30 2017 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: JanAmosComenius

Its just part of my site package now. Its 90% citations anyways. I could go and write a proper book off it, but first it'll become a significant element set in my Darkest Patterns documentary series...




posted on Dec, 30 2017 @ 11:27 AM
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a reply to: IgnoranceIsntBlisss

Whooops! Wha the fck did I just click there to get on some red list? Mind blown, head thoroughly smoked...

The only constructive criticism I could possibly come up with after my first "short" 30min glimpse relates to your sidekicks on integration policies, and to the good old proliferation of this refugee wave. Of course. Yes. I can see the angle of exploitation and all the potential chaos of migration "they" wont let go to waste, but that doesn't imply that all efforts of integration are de facto futile. That's precisely the kind of "culture-clash" war-rhetorics we ought to dissect a tad more carefully. Right?
A project like this deserves more objectivity, brightly. This could be the kind of book even I'd consider to buy and recommend when it doesn't cater to the stupid with snarky remarks. And your work doesn't need any filler of sorts. It could be even more awesome with a stricter focus on the tangible things, ya know... facts only, not opinion?

Anyway. 3 cheers and kudos to you! Guess you're an official Social Justice Warrior as well now, welcome to the pack!





edit on 30-12-2017 by PublicOpinion because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2018 @ 03:49 PM
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originally posted by: JanAmosComenius
And after day and half still is ...

It is really shame your opus magnum designed specifically for this site got attention of subpar puppy video.


It made the front page for several days still, so not down the memory hole overnight, is all I ever care about.


edit on 1-1-2018 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2018 @ 10:58 AM
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originally posted by: IgnoranceIsntBlisss
I give you:
The Complete Nexus of the Cold War, CIA Drug Trafficking & the War on Terror

You compiled all this info? It's a very well written timeline. I haven't made it all the way through the info yet (only up to the 1960's) but for the most part it all seems accurate too. Well done.



posted on Jan, 3 2018 @ 11:07 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

Thanks! I did the first thrust last year, and then was going do a quick update last week and got sucked down the rabbit hole.



posted on Jan, 3 2018 @ 11:11 AM
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a reply to: IgnoranceIsntBlisss

Heh. Like you said in the U2U, we may be at our throats often, but we do agree on drugs. You have my support on this one 100%.



posted on Jun, 5 2018 @ 05:11 PM
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The Government Knew the War on Drugs Was Doomed from the Start
But he isn’t the first president to see it that way. Before Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush turned drugs into a signifier of urban decay, and before Nixon launched his “War on Drugs,” President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1965 assigned James Vorenberg, future assistant to Watergate special prosecutor Archibald Cox, to lead more than a dozen legal experts and scholars to examine "every facet of crime and law enforcement in America." Far from a cohesive system, little was known about how the fragmented patchwork of "law and order" actually worked. Among other accomplishments, the task force helped establish 9-1-1 dispatch services across the United States and a procedure governing the treatment of suspects after arrest.

But there was also a short and obscure chapter in the Commission on Law Enforcement’s 1967 report, titled "Narcotics and Drug Abuse," that addressed both the causes and ramifications of illicit substance use. The commission was "decades ahead of its time" on the topic of drugs, Bryce Pardo and Peter Reuter write in "Narcotics and Drug Abuse: Foreshadowing 50 Years of Change," their new paper in the journal Criminology & Public Policy.

The authors, drug policy researchers at the University of Maryland, analyzed the commission’s chapter on drugs—now over 50 years old—with fresh eyes and new knowledge. The Appeal caught up with Pardo to discuss contemporary drug policy, including the use of harsh criminal penalties, the new difficulties posed by illicit fentanyl, and alternatives to prohibition gaining political momentum.




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