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FCC plan would give Internet providers power to choose the sites customers see and use

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posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 07:00 PM
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originally posted by: CB328
This will mean that the percentage of Americans that are dumb, ignorant, apathetic or selfish will grow even larger because only corporate approved information will be available.


Agreed





The whole internet will be like Fox news- fake conservative, and never challenging anyone to think beyond their indoctrination. Imagine if the web were as bland as a corporate workplace, like the one I have to suffer through, no thanks.


WHAT????????????
Try like CNN and how the MSM and Lobbyist pushed Hillary down your throat and hid all her scandals .

I despise Foxnews as much as cnn and msnbc as they have the same goal and are lobbyist wh0res. Even foxnews was against Ron Paul and Trump because they were sending a message that did not go with what the lobbyist wanted.

edit on 021130America/ChicagoWed, 22 Nov 2017 19:02:36 -0600000000p3042 by interupt42 because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 07:43 PM
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originally posted by: interupt42
Absolutely, this will be the republicans obamacare.

The DNC could drag the Pelosi corpse as their candidate and they will win, after the people realize how Fd their internet was destroyed by the republicans.


That's still a long ways out. If this passes (which is likely) there are a huge host of legal challenges already lined up. There's enough that this is going to be legislated through 2020, at which point the FCC can be changed and the entire thing scrapped. If that doesn't happen, we're still going to wind up with a campaign issue of breaking up the monopolies. After that it will go to the Supreme Court, which would probably result in the landmark case of the century as it spans states rights, the supremacy clause, 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 9th, and 10th amendments, not to mention the ability of businesses to remain internationally competitive.

Basically, there's so much red tape here that even when repeal happens, Republicans aren't going to see any short term blowback because implementation will be delayed until after 2020.



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 07:57 PM
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arstechnica.com...


A senior FCC official spoke with reporters about Pai's anti-net neutrality plan in a phone briefing yesterday and explained why the FCC is not swayed by public opinion on net neutrality.

The vast majority of comments consisted of form letters from both pro- and anti-net neutrality groups and generally did not introduce new facts into the record or make serious legal arguments, the official from Pai's office said. In general, the comments stated opinions or made assertions and did not have much bearing on Pai's decision, the official said. The official spoke with reporters on the condition that he not be named and that his comments can be paraphrased but not quoted directly.

The FCC isn't required to follow public opinion, but Pai favorably cites public opinion when it suits him.

On net neutrality, Pai and his staff have consistently said that they would consider the quality of the comments rather than the quantity on each side. Yet in another recent decision to eliminate a regulation, Pai took the opposite approach.

The Pai staffer who spoke with reporters acknowledged that there were legitimate comments from both sides in the net neutrality docket. In Pai's draft order, the FCC comprehensively addresses all the serious comments that made factual and legal arguments, the official said.

Pai's order, not surprisingly, speaks favorably of research in the docket that supports his claim that broadband network investment fell as a result of net neutrality rules. The proposal then criticizes studies that found the opposite, saying they used methods that are "unlikely to yield reliable results" or have other problems.

Pai also was not swayed by the fact that ISPs themselves have told investors that the rules do not harm their network investments. That's significant because publicly traded companies are required by law to give investors accurate financial information, including a description of risk factors involved in investing in the company.

Another expression of public opinion comes in the form of complaints filed by consumers against their Internet providers. Yet the FCC initially refused to release the text of tens of thousands of those complaints.

Consumer advocacy groups wanted more time to review those complaints in order to submit analyses into the net neutrality docket. But when the FCC finally released more of them, the big document release came just one day before the deadline for the public to comment on the anti-net neutrality plan.



That's some fine democracy at work right there.



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 08:04 PM
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a reply to: dug88

98.5% of unique, verified comments to the FCC, as in non bot posts have been pro Net Neutrality.



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 08:07 PM
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Ahh, The age old argument that amuses me

Corporations: We want to take control of the internet from the government
Conservatives: YES! This is great
Corporations: We will run it as well as we run EA or Twitter.
Conservatives: You mean the most hated company and the place that censors conservatives?
Corporations: Shhhhh


Guess who's head is on the chopping block once the elite take over information...and you lot bitch about liberal media and hollywood...wait till the internet is enforced PC...as you cheer it on.



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

I agree, but am giving it slight hope for a winning battle because there is nothing else. These corps* run the show with the internet, they will bend it as needed if if they feel they have lost to cable TV no longer being popular, now turning in less revenue. As more dead voter bots(see here) to agree NN needs to go. After all a new yacht, a third home in the Bahamas, etc., mean more than our freedom.


*Comcast
Verizon
Time Warner Cable
AT&T


edit on 22-11-2017 by dreamingawake because: spelling



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 10:21 PM
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Bypass your net provider use a VPN.

www.geckoandfly.com...

US net rules do not apply in Canada and you can track your VPN through a Canadian VPN site.



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 11:11 PM
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The one thing that should be noted. Is that in the past when we had land lines. We paid taxes for the infrastructure for the internet. So we the taxpayers paid for the internet to begin with. Along with our taxes from the federal government as well.

Every city was suppose to have fiber installed via all these taxes. Some companies got away with not instaling it. Some companies big shots took that money and blew it on nice houses. We should be demanding an investigation on why our infrastructure is now considered crap compared to other countries.

We paid for a service well in advance. Now they want us to pay again after they blew our money. Yet all they are offering is gate way service. We should be demanding the "Big" companies honor the USA peoples a first rate communications highway. If not we need to force the big D to take a look at this. Maybe he can make our fiber network Huuuuge.
edit on 22-11-2017 by ratpunk because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-11-2017 by ratpunk because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 11:14 PM
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originally posted by: ANNED
Bypass your net provider use a VPN.

www.geckoandfly.com...

US net rules do not apply in Canada and you can track your VPN through a Canadian VPN site.


ISP's will have block lists to prevent the use of such things if this passes.

So no, your idea will not work.



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 11:17 PM
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a reply to: ratpunk

This is true. The US taxpayer has already paid for the infrastructure. The ISPs have reaped massive benefits on the backs of Americans for decades.

In Europe, internet is faster and cheaper -- and net neutrality laws are built in.

It's pretty sad when internet access is better in small villages in Romania than in parts of the USA. . .

Considering the USA "invented" the internet.



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 11:30 PM
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Repealing Net Neutrality would be a big win for Big Corporations and their paid for Big Government.
Consumers would have less choice. Look at all the Big ISPs lobbying to repeal it.
Follow the money and donations.

If it promoted small business competition they would be against repealing it.

It costs billions of dollars in infrastructure to to even begin to compete with them.
As a comparison, I have pointed out in the past how it is the same Big Corporations all the time supplying our military with planes, bombs and so on and there is no competition against them.

The reply by the worshipers of the military industrial complex say that they are the only ones that can do it because it costs billions in dollars for a startup to even compete. Funny how they do not apply that same thinking to this.

Where are the small start up business competing with Lockheed Martin and Boeing then? Come on, where is the competition, there should be thousands of small business competing with them based on this rationale.


Big Corporate Fascists always win



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 11:37 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: roadgravel

I dunno. Maybe.
Maybe something running in parallel. Somehow.


We would all have to get implants that would become a pivotal event in history, but satellites could send signals down to our bionic brains.



posted on Nov, 23 2017 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: jacobe001

Can US citizens circumvent AT&T (and other upstream providers) censorship/toggling/removing/whatever implementation of the absence of net neutrality, via VPN/Proxy thru Europe or other countries?

What will become the future of the use of Tor browser to retrieve content that US upstream providers shut down?

I hate to ask this... will US upstream providers eliminate access to this, the ATS website?

Thank you.



posted on Nov, 23 2017 @ 07:57 AM
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originally posted by: Adonsa
a reply to: jacobe001

Can US citizens circumvent AT&T (and other upstream providers) censorship/toggling/removing/whatever implementation of the absence of net neutrality, via VPN/Proxy thru Europe or other countries?

What will become the future of the use of Tor browser to retrieve content that US upstream providers shut down?

I hate to ask this... will US upstream providers eliminate access to this, the ATS website?

Thank you.


If you check a few pages back this is already answered but. No. You can't use those things you still have to go through your ISP which will be able to block access to VPN's or whatever they want as well as conducting full scale monitoring of all packets sent and received.

They will be able to block based on content type, which websites the content is coming from, what country's the websites are based in. All of this is done at the very first step of your internet connection before you would connect to a VPN or TOR.


edit on 23/11/2017 by dug88 because: (no reason given)

edit on 23/11/2017 by dug88 because: (no reason given)

edit on 23/11/2017 by dug88 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2017 @ 08:08 AM
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originally posted by: ANNED
Bypass your net provider use a VPN.

www.geckoandfly.com...

US net rules do not apply in Canada and you can track your VPN through a Canadian VPN site.


VPN's don't bypass your ISP. It simply stops your ISP from reading your traffic. However the new laws will allow ISP's to block VPN's if they so choose.



posted on Nov, 23 2017 @ 08:22 AM
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originally posted by: Adonsa
a reply to: jacobe001

Can US citizens circumvent AT&T (and other upstream providers) censorship/toggling/removing/whatever implementation of the absence of net neutrality, via VPN/Proxy thru Europe or other countries?

What will become the future of the use of Tor browser to retrieve content that US upstream providers shut down?

I hate to ask this... will US upstream providers eliminate access to this, the ATS website?

Thank you.


There's no circumventing it. As for Tor, they would have the ability to shut it down by blocking encrypted traffic (a power which would be given to them), whether they would or not remains to be seen since encryption is a vital part of the internet, as transactions can't really be safely made without encryption.



posted on Nov, 23 2017 @ 08:48 AM
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Your government is owned. Plain and simple. And without an apparent uprising on the horizon, they will do exactly what their donors and pocket liners tell them to.

Albuterol is a great example. First patented in 1968, its been on the market as an aerosol inhaler for the majority of our lives. Then someone in the government got the idea that the war against HFC's warranted the removal them from medicinal inhalers. Because obviously it will destroy the atmosphere one puff at a time.

So how did this work out? Albuterol was repatented to include formulation for new propellants, and a puff counter. This took a critical medicine from about $5 up to about $140. Not for any real innovation, and with the apparent fingerprints of corruption all along the way.



posted on Nov, 23 2017 @ 08:58 AM
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Here's another, some countries don't have Net Neutrality right now, countries like Portugal.

Here's the actual pricing for mobile from one of their carriers

www.meo.pt...

That is what's coming.

Edit: Here's New Zealand, another country without Net Neutrality
www.vodafone.co.nz...

Note that the New Zealand one is what it looks like with competition. It's still not a good look.
edit on 23-11-2017 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2017 @ 08:58 AM
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originally posted by: ANNED
Bypass your net provider use a VPN.

www.geckoandfly.com...

US net rules do not apply in Canada and you can track your VPN through a Canadian VPN site.


That will not work. Without net neutrality principles and the other measures they are implementing they can throttle you or block you from accessing the vpn provider.



posted on Nov, 23 2017 @ 09:08 AM
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we could all revolt, open up our wifis, then maybe only two or so people in a neighborhood would have to actually pay for the crap service the companies chose to provide while the entire neighborhood enjoys the service at a fraction of the cost
it's bad enough that these companies are providing all the telecommunications services, phone, tv, internet and we are already paying in insane amount of money mainly to be bombed with more commercials than usefulness.
if we have to pay more and get less, then we should be paying for the content we want, the ads should go no more scam phone calls and texts, no more pop up internet ads, no more commercials on the tv!



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