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Any rock hounds in the house.?

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posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 05:49 AM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

Hmm, there are a fair few possibilities as to what it might be. Have you tried seeing where it is on the Ohms scale yet? If you can narrow it down further, it will be much eaier to get a definitive answer (not easy simply looking at a self evidenced poorly lighted pic).






posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 06:06 AM
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originally posted by: Macenroe82
a reply to: Soloprotocol

Could you possibly take another photo, but with extreme zoom on the face you sheered?
I would like to see the granularity of the rock.
Is the rock soft?
can you do a hardness test for me and find a small spot you could try scrapping with a pin.


It hard but also brittle. Tried scraping with a file and it marked the file.

i'll add some closer pics in a moment.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 06:09 AM
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posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 06:10 AM
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originally posted by: Flavian
a reply to: Soloprotocol

Hmm, there are a fair few possibilities as to what it might be. Have you tried seeing where it is on the Ohms scale yet? If you can narrow it down further, it will be much eaier to get a definitive answer (not easy simply looking at a self evidenced poorly lighted pic).



ohms scale..?



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 06:22 AM
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If it's heaver than iron, it may be radioactive. It mite be good to test. What area did you find it in.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 07:13 AM
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originally posted by: Nickn3
If it's heaver than iron, it may be radioactive. It mite be good to test. What area did you find it in.

Well i licked it last night and i'm still here today. Central Scotland in a farmers field next the river clyde. For those who know Scotland the central belt was heavily mined for centuries. Mostly coal but also tin and shale gas.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 07:36 AM
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originally posted by: Soloprotocol

originally posted by: Flavian
a reply to: Soloprotocol

Hmm, there are a fair few possibilities as to what it might be. Have you tried seeing where it is on the Ohms scale yet? If you can narrow it down further, it will be much eaier to get a definitive answer (not easy simply looking at a self evidenced poorly lighted pic).



ohms scale..?


D'oh! Moh Scale.......

That's what happens when you try to participate on ATS whilst dealing with clients at the same time!



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 08:03 AM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

Looks like iron.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 08:06 AM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol


I think he means mohs scale.
Hardness scale.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 08:08 AM
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a reply to: Nickn3





If it's heaver than iron, it may be radioactive. It mite be good to test. What area did you find it in


And are your hair and teeth falling out? Kidding of course.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 08:09 AM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

It could be tin. It's the right color. Do test it's hardness.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 08:12 AM
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a reply to: Tristran

i thought they bit to test hardness... Ya learn something new every day.
edit on 10262017 by Sillyolme because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 08:16 AM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

Tin is non magnetic. You said tin was mined in the area. Tin is white in color like silver. It seems like tin would be the most likely doesn't it?



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 08:23 AM
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---------------------
i suggest the photo: (exhibit A) and the text: (exhibit B) info have a connection that will identify the object


i see a white crystalline matrix in the chipped rock object...the dark and encrusted stone has likely been in a bed of fire coals (or even in a forge hearth) to get that scorched appearance... the object does not apper to be metal or ore, so the weight baffles me...

Exhibit A

originally posted by: Soloprotocol
Any ideas.?



Exhibit B

originally posted by: DAVID64
a reply to: Soloprotocol

"...When it occurs in crystalline form, which is rare, it is as grayish green, light brown, white, or transparent crystals ..."





edit on th31150902425426242017 by St Udio because: fix tags

edit on th31150902432526252017 by St Udio because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 11:59 AM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: Soloprotocol

Looks like iron.

Again, not magnetic in the slightest.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 12:02 PM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: Soloprotocol

Tin is non magnetic. You said tin was mined in the area. Tin is white in color like silver. It seems like tin would be the most likely doesn't it?

Could give me a marker for Bronze. The farm i detect on has had several bronze age artifacts..stone only though. I'm chasing the bronze on the farm. it must be there and tin could be an indication that bronze was manufactured in the area.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:58 PM
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I found a very heavy rock in my back yard a couple of years ago. It was much heavier than one would expect for a "rock" its size.

I was initially excited to think it was a meteorite. But after some research it turned out to just be industrial slag.

I don't recall whether a magnet would stick to it or not. However, my metal detector definitely indicated it contained iron. Did you scan your sample with a metal detector to see what metal it contains?

Also, one thing about industrial slag, it contains a number of contaminates, including Arsenic. Might want to be careful about what you taste.


-dex



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