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Opioid Use Explains 20% of Drop in American Men From Labor Force

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posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 11:31 AM
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a reply to: DustbowlDebutante

I'd guess you're correct, they are on disability. I don't know how, but during the Obama years, the Social Security Administration was instructed to drastically increase the number of people on Social Security Disability. I have a friend who, upon turning 65, retired and got letters from SS advising he should look into Disability benefits. He got several letters like that and it irritated him because he wasn't disabled in any form or fashion.

I honestly don't understand it. Back in the day, it was damned near impossible to get Disability. Now, anyone with a hang nail it appears can get some percentage Disability payment.




posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 11:38 AM
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posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 11:54 AM
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Streaming link for the lazy:

Opioid Crisis Looms Over Job Market Worrying Employers And Economists

edit on 7-9-2017 by Namdru because: sperfluous linik



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 11:57 AM
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a reply to: Illumimasontruth

Yes - good point!!



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 12:04 PM
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a reply to: loam

Oh, it's definitely a serious national concern. I think most of us know/have known opiate addicts and many of us have known people who have overdosed and died. And it's not a problem that is affecting just a small segment of society. I had a friend from high school OD about a month ago and he was a successful business owner in ATL, pulling down well into the six figures. One day he's posting pictures with his fiance and his new Benz on Facebook and a few days later, his parents are announcing his passing.

And it's been a growing epidemic for some time. We adopted my sister-in-law's kids after she OD'd about a decade ago and for all her other problems, she wasn't a regular user. She'd lost her job, lost her house, moved to the hood and fell in with junkie neighbors.

At the time I was working in a distribution facility where probably 15% of the warehousemen were popping perc 10s like candy.

Not that I'm at all unique in this but believe me, I get that it's a problem as much as anyone else. That said, 20% is 33x greater than .6%.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 12:18 PM
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Opiate use is a symptom of the problem, not the problem itself. For a lot of people, it's the only light in a day of drudgery and depression as they try to scrape through another day.

The drug "problem" won't be fixed until we create a society that doesn't make escape from it mandatory.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 12:20 PM
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originally posted by: badw0lf

originally posted by: Bluntone22
a reply to: toysforadults


the problem is not the drug, it's the cause of the use of the drug. So look at society. Look at the world we are living in.




Nope. My neighbor in a nice middle-class neighborhood with tons of support died at 28 of his addiction. I had known that kid since he was 10. It is a hell of a drug. We all tried to help him, but it was not enough. He wasn't messed up, mad at society, or anything like that. He was addicted. Plain and simple.
edit on 7-9-2017 by MisterMcKill because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 12:30 PM
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originally posted by: MisterMcKill

originally posted by: badw0lf

originally posted by: Bluntone22
a reply to: toysforadults


the problem is not the drug, it's the cause of the use of the drug. So look at society. Look at the world we are living in.




Nope. My neighbor in a nice middle-class neighborhood with tons of support died at 28 of his addiction. I had known that kid since he was 10. It is a hell of a drug. We all tried to help him, but it was not enough. He wasn't messed up, mad at society, or anything like that. He was addicted. Plain and simple.


How do you know that? Most people you meet are fighting internal battles you'll never know anything about. The most depressed, hardcore drug addicts I've known have been upper-middle class.

Material comforts don't lead to happiness or being well adjusted. For a lot of people, it's the exact opposite.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 12:32 PM
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a reply to: underwerks

Because I was very close friends with him, his older brother, and the rest of his family for 20 years? Why are people attempting to downplay how addictive this drug is?
edit on 7-9-2017 by MisterMcKill because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: TobyFlenderson


I think a lot of the people dropping out of the system are not only addicts but also the dealers. The greater the demand, which this epidemic has created, the more suppliers there will be.

The "epidemic" began shortly after NATO invaded Afghanistan.

telesurtv



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: loam

I call this a questionable if not bogus study. It doesn't seem to factor in the aging work population, those "boomers" that are getting old, not to mention sick, fired, replaced, and just laid off. Remove the older workforce of today to the numbers that he was comparing with, and you may find not such a large increase. I don't doubt some increase, but not that much and not necessarily for his reasons.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 12:43 PM
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I hate those pain pills, I am constipated most times and they make it worse. I consider it a miracle if I am pooping good for a month. Miracles never happen.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: loam

If it wasn't for the drug testing in sure we would have millions less on welfare and back on the job.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 01:21 PM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
a reply to: toysforadults

Not disagreeing with you but I have a question.

How do people with low wages pay for what I assume is a fairly expensive drug?



They steal or leach off of someone else.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 01:22 PM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
no, low wages and poor upward mobility explain and increase in opoid use not the other way around

people are turning to drugs because of a lack of meaningful opportunity and a total decline in community and sense of involvement and meaning



I agree. We need a higher minimum wage and We need to get these people off welfare and make sure EVERYONE contributes to society and the tax coffers.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 01:23 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: TobyFlenderson


I think a lot of the people dropping out of the system are not only addicts but also the dealers. The greater the demand, which this epidemic has created, the more suppliers there will be.

The "epidemic" began shortly after NATO invaded Afghanistan.

telesurtv
< br /> I don't think that's a coincidence at all.

Something else I've found that may be connected, is that over the past few years Mexico has risen as the main supplier of most of America. That middle eastern product that's a result of our middle eastern conquests is now largely confined to the east coast. Everywhere west of the Mississippi is Mexican product.

And as soon as Mexico starts taking over a lot of territory and undercutting the middle eastern dope, what happens..

Border security! A wall! Immigration reform!, etc.

It's almost like someone that facilitates the importation of the middle eastern product is feeling the pinch as the Mexicans expand their territory..

But hey, the government would never sell drugs. That's crazy people talk.




posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 01:28 PM
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originally posted by: MisterMcKill
a reply to: underwerks

Because I was very close friends with him, his older brother, and the rest of his family for 20 years? Why are people attempting to downplay how addictive this drug is?



Most Men will never talk about their internal problems because they don't want to appear weak. I worry all the time due to the unstable job market and My family never hears a peep about it because I don't want to worry them. I've been laid off every year for the last five years due to a full time job becoming a seasonal job and I still hold My head up because My family needs strength.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 01:32 PM
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a reply to: underwerks

Interesting. Yes, all that border security, and still the dope and immigrants get in.
Theres your sign.

Remember too, Big Pharma is dependent on Opium for all their legal 'downers'.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 01:36 PM
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I have been a practicing pharmacist for the past decade, and in school for quite a few years before while working in a pharmacy as an intern. I have never seen it this bad.

I literally have hundreds of patients on suboxone to manage their addiction, and there are more than 4 clinics within a 10 minute drive of the very small town I work in.

I know there are people in chronic pain, but we need to stop only treating the symptoms and go after the underlying problem. I would say 30 percent of my patients are on some sort of narcotic pain therapy.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 01:36 PM
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a reply to: jkm1864


We need a higher minimum wage and We need to get these people off welfare and make sure EVERYONE contributes to society and the tax coffers.

How about making mega corp return from overseas, pay tariffs if they don't, and hire at home instead of importing on HI-B Visas?

Not to mention all the immigrant labor that works for cheap in Big Agro and Livestock.

The average american is the victim in all this, no wonder they want to get high.



edit on 7-9-2017 by intrptr because: bb cods



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