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Mandela Effect - Romeo O Romeo, Wherefore Art Thou Romeo?

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posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 07:51 AM
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Yep - you guessed it..

It's no longer

Romeo O Romeo.. Wherefore Art Thou Romeo?


It's now

O Romeo Romeo.. Wherefore Art Thou Romeo?


As per usual, there's residual evidence (not a ton on this one). Search Google for the term "Romeo O Romeo" with quotes.

No sense waisting time uploading residue here though - just getting the word out for those that are Effected.

Enjoy.




posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 07:55 AM
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Er.. its always be o romeo romeo..?



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 07:56 AM
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a reply to: Pearj

That's odd.

As I remember from my high school days, it was ...

"Romeo O Romeo, wherefore art thou my Romeo."

I guess this M E has had more than one chance to take effect.

Of course, "we" had a slightly different response to the question. It seems romeo replied, "Down here in the bushes. The ladder broke."
edit on 7-9-2017 by tinymind because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 07:56 AM
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a reply to: Pearj


Are you referring to the great playwright William Shookspeare?



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 08:01 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Damn M.E wasn't his name Shexpeer?

I just read on Reddit one of the comments were: "I always thought it was Romeo YO Romeo"



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 08:06 AM
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a reply to: Pearj
Differences that are apparent within this timeline don't match the original description of "Mandela effect" (in which the records of this timeline clashed with people's memories). They simply reflect the fact that we live in a world where things change.
Quotations are particularly vulnerable because people's minds have an unconscious tendency to "adjust" them to make them sound better. One of those versions is the "adjusted" version.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 08:06 AM
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Yep. Definitely some sort of alternate universe/timeline effect.

Can't possibly be that people have misquoted it ever. That never happens with Shakespeare.


+12 more 
posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 08:07 AM
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a reply to: Pearj

"Romeo O Romeo" is not high Elizabethan romance. It's twentieth-century American English, as in
"Christmas Tree O Christmas Tree".

To repeat "Romeo" twice, one after the other without an intervening interjection ('O'), conforms to classical poetics generally. For real, impassioned emphasis, lather and repeat. No rinse in between. So therefore

'O Romeo, Romeo' == the cry of a desperately in-love woman

'Romeo, O Romeo' == a woman playfully calling to her dog, kid or Italian hairdresser.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 08:11 AM
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a reply to: tinymind


originally posted by: tinymind
a reply to: Pearj

That's odd.

As I remember from my high school days, it was ...

"Romeo O Romeo, wherefore art thou my Romeo."

I guess this M E has had more than one chance to take effect.

Of course, "we" had a slightly different response to the question. It seems romeo replied, "Down here in the bushes. The ladder broke."



You're who I'm trying to reach. It was "Romeo O Romeo" for my wife and I in highschool too.

Glad I came back to check responses!



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 08:11 AM
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Okay, now we can discredit works of shakes pear, too.

I got news for thuu,

Old english is changed many times from there to ere.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 08:15 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: Pearj


Are you referring to the great playwright William Shookspeare?


Are you kidding? Everyone knows that Ben Jonson wrote "A Feud in Old Verona."

Jesu.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 08:18 AM
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As the person that played Romeo in our HS play, it was O Romeo, Romeo.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 08:21 AM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

Yes !
But, it was a plagiarized version of Bill's work just a few years before.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 08:58 AM
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If you learn your Shakespeare on TV then 'Romeo O Romeo' is their common mis-quote.

Read the books or act the roles however and all will become clear!



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 08:59 AM
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originally posted by: Pearj
a reply to: tinymind


originally posted by: tinymind
a reply to: Pearj

That's odd.

As I remember from my high school days, it was ...

"Romeo O Romeo, wherefore art thou my Romeo."

I guess this M E has had more than one chance to take effect.

Of course, "we" had a slightly different response to the question. It seems romeo replied, "Down here in the bushes. The ladder broke."



You're who I'm trying to reach. It was "Romeo O Romeo" for my wife and I in highschool too.

Glad I came back to check responses!


You must've gone to school quite some time ago.

This movie from 1968 would like a word with you in regards to your memory. Or lack of, rather.



ETA - it's at 1:44ish.
edit on 7-9-2017 by Shamrock6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 08:59 AM
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a reply to: Pearj

Really?!?!

There is a contradiction in some old memory you have, and your assumption is not that your memory has changed, but that reality has changed????

Man that is a VERY egotistical leap lol..


Is there a more case of "I'm not wrong everyone else is!!"

(PS not you , you.. just a figure of speech refering to the Mandela effect period)



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 09:00 AM
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a reply to: JoshuaCox


your assumption is not that your memory has changed, but that reality has changed????


Mandela effect in a one line summary.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: Pearj

Just because someone remembers Shakespeare incorrectly doesn't mean a thing. Lots of words get misquoted.
What comes after that line?

Deny thy father and refuse thy name.
If you're not a fan you wouldn't know.

It's always been o Romeo, Romeo. Not Romeo o Romeo.
Try to remember this is a fifteen year old girl speaking, no pleading, Romeo Romeo do this for me.



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: Shamrock6

It never happens with anyone...

Human memory is far superior to physics and reality.. obviously..


Lol



posted on Sep, 7 2017 @ 09:02 AM
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a reply to: tinymind

Did you play Juliet?



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