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A Valuable Lesson To Be Learned

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posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 08:53 AM
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danified.net...

A man named posted on his Facebook account a picture of a sports car he had just bought and how another man approached and told him that the money used to buy this car could've fed thousands of less fortunate people. His response to this is making him famous on the Internet.



A guy looked at my Corvette the other day and said, "I wonder how many people could have been fed for the money that sports car cost."

I replied, "I am not sure, it fed a lot of families in Bowling Green, Kentucky who built it, it fed the people who make the tires, it fed the people who made the components that went into it, it fed the people in the copper mine who mined the copper for the wires, it fed people in Decatur, IL at Caterpillar who make the trucks that haul the copper ore. It fed the trucking people who hauled it from the plant to the dealer and fed the people working at the dealership and their families.

BUT, ... I have to admit, I guess I really don't know how many people it fed."

That is the difference between capitalism and welfare mentality. When you buy something, you put money in people's pockets, and give them dignity for their skills.


I guess if you're ready to 'virtue signal' back, you can be prepared for such an ambush.

Disclaimer: Like many of you, I don't have a Facebook account to validate this story. I do have a wise old friend who shares things with me via e-mail though.


edit on Sun Aug 20 2017 by DontTreadOnMe because: no source....... IMPORTANT: Using Content From Other Websites on ATS

edit on Sun Aug 20 2017 by DontTreadOnMe because: trimmed quote and added source




posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 08:57 AM
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"Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime" - disputed , and not certain




posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 09:07 AM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
"Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime" - disputed , and not certain




Ummm...I suppose it depends on how much you like fishing...and giving away the fruits of your labor so that you can remain on the same nutritionally challenged level as your peers...




YouSir



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 09:12 AM
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originally posted by: YouSir

originally posted by: Gothmog
"Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime" - disputed , and not certain




Ummm...I suppose it depends on how much you like fishing...and giving away the fruits of your labor so that you can remain on the same nutritionally challenged level as your peers...




YouSir

I suppose in another reality whatever that meant makes sense.




posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 09:15 AM
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Love it, when i was young my father was a wealthy man, but he never bought me anything of value other then necessities. I always wondered why and even asked and he told me Id never learn the value of hard work if everything was givin to me and i would never appreciate and take care of those things givin to me. I didnt understand then but i learned as i got older. I never got paid an allowance for all my chores. When i was in 4th grade i use to go all over the neighborhood asking to mow lawns or odd jobs to save money for a trip with my friend. My dad owned a business, lived in an upscale neighborhood in kck and he could have easily just given me the money considering he flew to Florida every other weekend. Anywho, i started my first job when i was 14 bailing hay for 7 cents a bail. I learned the value of hard work young, i wish most people have aswell. But most of my family were farmers and hard workers. Anyway, that guys response was on point. If he can buy it, good for him, he probably worked hard for it while that hater was jelly

edit on 20-8-2017 by Bwomp83 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 09:24 AM
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originally posted by: YouSir

originally posted by: Gothmog
"Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime" - disputed , and not certain




Ummm...I suppose it depends on how much you like fishing...and giving away the fruits of your labor so that you can remain on the same nutritionally challenged level as your peers...




YouSir


Its an analogy, instead of fishing for said person and always giving him his necessities you teach him so he learns to take care of himself. Those lessons are valuable, one thing that holds true in life is you can never rely on anybody but yourself. If they let you down you lose, but in reality your the one to blame for not doing it yourself. In this case these days everybody wants to blame everyone else for everything. Where your at today is a product of a decision youve made in the past.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 09:26 AM
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a reply to: Bwomp83
.25 a bale, here. And yes, very hard work and very hot most of the time.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 09:29 AM
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originally posted by: abago71
a reply to: Bwomp83
.25 a bale, here. And yes, very hard work and very hot most of the time.



I believe that, my dad said when he was young, him and two other friends made half a penny a bail each, hes 63 though back then he said you could go on a date for less then $5, gas, food, and movie. Wish i couldve been around those days.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 09:30 AM
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edit on 20-8-2017 by Bwomp83 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 09:41 AM
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originally posted by: Snarl

A man named posted on his Facebook account a picture of a sports car he had just bought and how another man approached and told him that the money used to buy this car could've fed thousands of less fortunate people. His response to this is making him famous on the Internet.



A guy looked at my Corvette the other day and said, "I wonder how many people could have been fed for the money that sports car cost."

I replied, "I am not sure, it fed a lot of families in Bowling Green, Kentucky who built it, it fed the people who make the tires, it fed the people who made the components that went into it, it fed the people in the copper mine who mined the copper for the wires, it fed people in Decatur, IL at Caterpillar who make the trucks that haul the copper ore. It fed the trucking people who hauled it from the plant to the dealer and fed the people working at the dealership and their families.

BUT, ... I have to admit, I guess I really don't know how many people it fed."

That is the difference between capitalism and welfare mentality. When you buy something, you put money in people's pockets, and give them dignity for their skills.

When you give someone something for nothing, you rob them of their dignity and self worth.

Capitalism is freely giving your money in exchange for something of value.

Socialism is taking your money against your will and shoving something down your throat that you never asked for.I've decided I can't be politically correct anymore. (I never was, actually).

His answer made him famous on the Internet world as it received almost half of a million shares and more than eight hundred thousand reactions on Facebook.

I guess if you're ready to 'virtue signal' back, you can be prepared for such an ambush.

Disclaimer: Like many of you, I don't have a Facebook account to validate this story. I do have a wise old friend who shares things with me via e-mail though.



Yes, that is how it works. MILTON friedman has a video where he does the same thing with a pencil explaining all the steps in the process to make one and the jobs created.

Im on my phine and cant post it but sure someone can look it up.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 09:50 AM
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a reply to: Bwomp83

I was raised the same way. I believe it helped me to have a good work ethic that has always provided my family with enough.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 10:42 AM
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originally posted by: Edumakated
I'm on my phone and can't post it, but I'm sure Snarl can look it up.

Friedman: One of the cutting intellects of our times.

My favorite one first:

A great talk for a lazy Sunday:

This may be the one you're remembering:



edit on 2082017 by Snarl because: autocorrect



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 10:54 AM
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originally posted by: Gothmog

originally posted by: YouSir

originally posted by: Gothmog
"Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime" - disputed , and not certain




Ummm...I suppose it depends on how much you like fishing...and giving away the fruits of your labor so that you can remain on the same nutritionally challenged level as your peers...




YouSir

I suppose in another reality whatever that meant makes sense.




Ummm...disputed...and not certain...




YouSir



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 10:57 AM
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What a thoughtful reply.
I doubt he came up with it on the spot but it's true nonetheless.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 12:01 PM
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Closed for source.....and reopened with source added.


edit on Sun Aug 20 2017 by DontTreadOnMe because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 04:56 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
"Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime" - disputed , and not certain



The problem, is that fishing isn't profitable. It's better to do something that's worth more money, and outsource fishing to those who are incapable of anything more than that. I don't know how to fish, or grow any of my own food, yet I can support myself.

I'll counter your parable with another.
If a man spends all his time fishing, he'll never have time to do anything else.


originally posted by: Bwomp83
Love it, when i was young my father was a wealthy man, but he never bought me anything of value other then necessities. I always wondered why and even asked and he told me Id never learn the value of hard work if everything was givin to me and i would never appreciate and take care of those things givin to me. I didnt understand then but i learned as i got older. I never got paid an allowance for all my chores. When i was in 4th grade i use to go all over the neighborhood asking to mow lawns or odd jobs to save money for a trip with my friend. My dad owned a business, lived in an upscale neighborhood in kck and he could have easily just given me the money considering he flew to Florida every other weekend. Anywho, i started my first job when i was 14 bailing hay for 7 cents a bail. I learned the value of hard work young, i wish most people have aswell. But most of my family were farmers and hard workers. Anyway, that guys response was on point. If he can buy it, good for him, he probably worked hard for it while that hater was jelly


Totally different experience for me. Growing up, I lived with my mom in near poverty. My dad on the other hand worked 14 hour days, every day, moving up the corporate ladder. He gained quite a bit of wealth and privilege in doing so, and on my visitations with him I got to see a bit of that. I got to grow up seeing extreme wealth and extreme poverty close up through my parents.

What I learned from both, was that working hard is for suckers. If you put in the hours, and have the right job title, you can make a lot of money. But you're not going to have the time to spend it, and you're not going to have the time to spend on or with others. On the other hand, if you're in poverty, you're going to have a bit more time, but no money and no comfort.

All teaching someone to bale hay at 1, 7, or 25 cents a bale does, is teach them that it's acceptable to sell their time for that little, and it's not. That's how your career development stagnates. Lets use another example, minimum wage. No one should work for minimum wage, because it's the very definition of selling your future potential in order to meet todays needs. If you work for $7.40 an hour, that's $15.392 per year. That's a bit over $61,000 to give up a 4 year degree. Under $100,000 for an actual education. How far does $100,000 go? It lasts 4 years, while your education increases your earnings potential over your lifetime.

All working for a low wage does, is stagnate your growth. Instead of making hay bales you could have used all that time studying. You would have had a couple less dates, but your career would undoubtedly be in a better place right now. You could be in a different industry, different job, different position, different company. All your dad did by making you work, was remove that potential from your life and make you think that such an activity is acceptable.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 05:24 PM
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originally posted by: Aazadan

originally posted by: Gothmog
"Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime" - disputed , and not certain



The problem, is that fishing isn't profitable. It's better to do something that's worth more money, and outsource fishing to those who are incapable of anything more than that. I don't know how to fish, or grow any of my own food, yet I can support myself.

I'll counter your parable with another.
If a man spends all his time fishing, he'll never have time to do anything else.


originally posted by: Bwomp83
Love it, when i was young my father was a wealthy man, but he never bought me anything of value other then necessities. I always wondered why and even asked and he told me Id never learn the value of hard work if everything was givin to me and i would never appreciate and take care of those things givin to me. I didnt understand then but i learned as i got older. I never got paid an allowance for all my chores. When i was in 4th grade i use to go all over the neighborhood asking to mow lawns or odd jobs to save money for a trip with my friend. My dad owned a business, lived in an upscale neighborhood in kck and he could have easily just given me the money considering he flew to Florida every other weekend. Anywho, i started my first job when i was 14 bailing hay for 7 cents a bail. I learned the value of hard work young, i wish most people have aswell. But most of my family were farmers and hard workers. Anyway, that guys response was on point. If he can buy it, good for him, he probably worked hard for it while that hater was jelly


Totally different experience for me. Growing up, I lived with my mom in near poverty. My dad on the other hand worked 14 hour days, every day, moving up the corporate ladder. He gained quite a bit of wealth and privilege in doing so, and on my visitations with him I got to see a bit of that. I got to grow up seeing extreme wealth and extreme poverty close up through my parents.

What I learned from both, was that working hard is for suckers. If you put in the hours, and have the right job title, you can make a lot of money. But you're not going to have the time to spend it, and you're not going to have the time to spend on or with others. On the other hand, if you're in poverty, you're going to have a bit more time, but no money and no comfort.

All teaching someone to bale hay at 1, 7, or 25 cents a bale does, is teach them that it's acceptable to sell their time for that little, and it's not. That's how your career development stagnates. Lets use another example, minimum wage. No one should work for minimum wage, because it's the very definition of selling your future potential in order to meet todays needs. If you work for $7.40 an hour, that's $15.392 per year. That's a bit over $61,000 to give up a 4 year degree. Under $100,000 for an actual education. How far does $100,000 go? It lasts 4 years, while your education increases your earnings potential over your lifetime.

All working for a low wage does, is stagnate your growth. Instead of making hay bales you could have used all that time studying. You would have had a couple less dates, but your career would undoubtedly be in a better place right now. You could be in a different industry, different job, different position, different company. All your dad did by making you work, was remove that potential from your life and make you think that such an activity is acceptable.


You lack the morale and benefits of integrity, humility, hard work and appreciation. I have only a ged, i work 50 to 62 hrs a week and i can bet my hard work i will be retired in 16 years when im 50. Btw, 7 vents a bale at 1000 a day in 1997, $70 a day was gpod money for a 14 year old. Id rather work hard, fail, and learn life lessons to become compassionate, embrace humility, and become humble then just have life hand me everything i need. The whole analogy about fishing is the ability to take care of yourself rather then rely on someone else, if you cant hunt, fish, grow food, make fires, and build shelter your far from being self sufficient. If our country ever bellys up your kind will be the first to go. You think humanity is better and smarter then we were 6000 years ago? Your wrong, watch how fast man becomes animal when the power and internet gets shut down. Im sure you will see these things in your life so you better go learn how to fish...



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 05:28 PM
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a reply to: Snarl




posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 09:41 PM
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originally posted by: Bwomp83
You lack the morale and benefits of integrity, humility, hard work and appreciation. I have only a ged, i work 50 to 62 hrs a week and i can bet my hard work i will be retired in 16 years when im 50. Btw, 7 vents a bale at 1000 a day in 1997, $70 a day was gpod money for a 14 year old. Id rather work hard, fail, and learn life lessons to become compassionate, embrace humility, and become humble then just have life hand me everything i need. The whole analogy about fishing is the ability to take care of yourself rather then rely on someone else, if you cant hunt, fish, grow food, make fires, and build shelter your far from being self sufficient. If our country ever bellys up your kind will be the first to go. You think humanity is better and smarter then we were 6000 years ago? Your wrong, watch how fast man becomes animal when the power and internet gets shut down. Im sure you will see these things in your life so you better go learn how to fish...


I don't lack integrity, humility, hard work, or appreciation. I've gone through all of that. We're the same age (I'm one year older, going by your username). I've spent my life from 6 years old, to 35 now in school. I have one more year to finish. That will leave me with 5 degrees, 21 years of programming experience, and 10 years of graphics experience. Some degrees were easier to earn than others, but that requires dedication. I wouldn't call any of them hard work, to me hard work requires physical torture and suffering, and the hardest I've ever worked has only involved some mental breakdowns and migraines.

Up until earlier this year, I did this while living in poverty. Maybe I'm simply a less capable individual, but I couldn't devote time to both work and study. So I studied, and lived like a pauper off nothing more than my disability check. Fortunately for me, this type of work is something I can do while disabled, so I was recently able to get off of it and work.

Will I be retired at 50? I don't know. What I do know is that for my first job out of school, while doing it full time over the summer my initial rate had me clearing well over 100k/year in an area of the country where houses sell for $50k. Since then I've gotten a raise/promotion and my now part time rate while finishing my last year of school is 80k/year at just 20 hours/week of work. After taxes, that leaves me with about $40k/year in income that I won't be spending. It's not an ideal amount to be saving, certainly not enough to be able to retire by 50, as that would only be $600,000 but it's not bad either. If you can hit the 1.3 million it takes to sustainably draw 52,000/year (median wage) at a 7% return (4% withdrawl, 3% reinvest for inflation) by age 50, then congratulations.

As far as working hard, failing, and learning life lessons goes... I don't work hard. I simply don't believe in it. I believe in working, but the protestant work ethic isn't something I embrace. Life to me is all about reducing suffering. Work is a necessary suffering at times, but working more than is necessary shouldn't be done. This also applies to chasing money. Money brings comfort, but when your pursuit of money makes you more uncomfortable, you've taken the concept too far. In the case of a 14 year old, chasing money definitely falls under the category of chasing money, just to have money, not to alleviate suffering. I also don't believe in failure, I've failed from time to time, but all that really means is that I don't have the core competency in my job to be where I should be. I make it a point to improve myself in some measurable way every single day, so that over time I fail less. And I learned my life lessons as a kid, I had a pretty colorful experience growing up. Saw the elites up close (including just how much better they are at handling situations than the average person), also saw the working stiffs up close. Very few people get to grow up seeing both perspectives at once.

Also, I see no reason why I should be able to do anything you listed. There are a few areas in which I have some skills and talents, and many areas in which I don't. I can get paid for using what abilities I do have, in order to trade my work for the things I'm not good at. That to me is self sufficiency. Self sufficiency does not mean the survivalist mentality to me where I give up everything I own just to maintain a subsistence lifestyle. As I've said many times, if the power goes out and we revert 300 years, I would happily commit suicide. That's a decision that I'm not conflicted about at all, why live in a world of suffering just to live? It's not that I would be unable to support myself (I'm quite good with numbers, I could easily be a banker), it's that I simply wouldn't want to live in that type of world.

My opinion on the matter, is that if you constantly reinforce your survival mentality, "just in case", you're maintaining a level of fear towards the world, and fear adds to suffering. It's the same reason I live in a high crime area and don't carry a gun, or even lock my doors. I don't believe in reinforcing a fear over the future.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 09:55 PM
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For someone your age apparently you have never learned the core value of failing. Everybody does, you either give up or you pick up and try harder. As far as working at 14, its the value of hard work and good work ethics ibe learned. I have no college and make $80k a year in a cheap place to live. Anywho, you dont have to write a book about it and college degrees are becoming useless now that everybody is getting them.




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