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A Valuable Lesson To Be Learned

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posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 09:59 PM
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Oh, btw, i can get a job today making $107k a year tax free, starting. But i wouldnt take that time away from my kids. If you know what your doing you can go pretty far with no degree. Trust me, im not good at making friends, i dont kiss ass nor do i try to make friends with management. I just work hard.




posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 10:19 PM
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a reply to: Bwomp83

What time away from your kids? You just claimed to work 62 hours per week.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 10:29 PM
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originally posted by: Aazadan
a reply to: Bwomp83

What time away from your kids? You just claimed to work 62 hours per week.


I get off work before they get outta school.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 10:29 PM
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originally posted by: Bwomp83
For someone your age apparently you have never learned the core value of failing. Everybody does, you either give up or you pick up and try harder. As far as working at 14, its the value of hard work and good work ethics ibe learned. I have no college and make $80k a year in a cheap place to live. Anywho, you dont have to write a book about it and college degrees are becoming useless now that everybody is getting them.


What core value of failing? I expect one of two things from people. Either absolute perfection (from myself, and anyone in authority), or absolutely nothing from anyone else. If you're in charge, you're there because you don't make mistakes. If you make a bunch of mistakes, I'm going to question the merit of why you're in charge. Therefore, it seems reasonable that if I'm going to expect perfection from others, I expect it from myself as well.

If you're not in charge, you're clearly not capable, and therefore I have no reason to expect something from you.

Relating that to failure, if you fail, you learn why it failed, and then you do it again. My field is Computer Science, I fail a lot. It's well under 1% of the time that I can write a program from scratch and have it work perfectly on the first attempt. Therefore, I consider myself pretty bad at the field. However, I do try, and I can eventually get there.

College degrees are currently worth more than ever, and the academic system is only improving. However, you need useful degrees. A friend of mine who I've had a weekly lunch ritual with for a few years now has dual masters in Political Science and History. A frequent topic of conversation is that while he's highly educated, his employment prospects are near zero. Mine are Computer Science, Computer Graphics, Interactive Technology, Web Programming, and soon I can add Business and Simulation Engineering. All that leads to being able to do work I enjoy doing. To me the pay is irrelevant as long as it's enough to live on. Education is about options, it lets you do the jobs in life that you want to do. I can and do, do the same work in my spare time, for fun, with no intention of selling anything that I do for work.

That to me is the goal. I have a pleasant work experience, and enough money to live somewhat comfortably, and can do so currently at just 20 hours/week of work.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 10:41 PM
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originally posted by: Bwomp83

originally posted by: Aazadan
a reply to: Bwomp83

What time away from your kids? You just claimed to work 62 hours per week.


I get off work before they get outta school.


Now I'm curious as to what you do. I'm guessing oil and gas mining, or possibly driving a truck.

And hard work won't take you far. If you're not management material, your career is already dead in the water. Does your company promote people to management with just a ged?
edit on 20-8-2017 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 10:49 PM
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Well, i guess it depends on how well you can connect the dots so to speak. To me, if you want to learn something, you go to a library, if you want to party you go to college, Einstein said that once, im a firm believer. My hard work and savings will pay off. With no degree and starting this business with my wife i will earn $20k to $30k a month, $20k atleast. I dont need a piece of paper telling me what i have accomplished, i know what i can do, i know what i have learned and i have much more to go, but i will get there with out school... Maybe not your hard work will pay off, but mine will. Im not trying to live life making someone else rich and paying off ridiculous student loans for a masters degree. Sure, right now im making someone rich working for someone else, but atleast i wont be skimming by paying off student loans doing it. But anywho, good luck!



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 10:51 PM
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originally posted by: Aazadan

originally posted by: Bwomp83

originally posted by: Aazadan
a reply to: Bwomp83

What time away from your kids? You just claimed to work 62 hours per week.


I get off work before they get outta school.


Now I'm curious as to what you do. I'm guessing oil and gas mining, or possibly driving a truck.

And hard work won't take you far. If you're not management material, your career is already dead in the water. Does your company promote people to management with just a ged?


I get yearly bonuses and a raise every 90 days. It doesnt matter what i do, what matters is im doing it



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 11:07 PM
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Milton Friedman... the pencil. Explains the OP using something really simple.




posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 11:10 PM
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a reply to: Snarl
That's a fine investment he's made. He can hand that car down to his grandkids. The people of Kentucky appreciate him.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 11:17 PM
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originally posted by: Edumakated
Milton Friedman... the pencil. Explains the OP using something really simple.


Welfare money doesn't disappear though. The government never removes money from the system. Because all the government does is sign checks, anything they remove gets reintroduced back into the market. If someone is drawing welfare, all of that welfare money they take is spent back into the local economy on goods and services. There's really no difference between buying a sportscar or giving out an entitlement. Both create jobs. The main difference is that entitlements give many people a small amount of power over the market while the sportscar gives a handful a large say.



posted on Aug, 20 2017 @ 11:25 PM
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originally posted by: Bwomp83
Well, i guess it depends on how well you can connect the dots so to speak. To me, if you want to learn something, you go to a library, if you want to party you go to college, Einstein said that once, im a firm believer.


You're a believer, but have you ever tried it up close? I have over 400 semester credits. I've been at the grind for a long time. There are people who party in school, but there are also people who study. Partying is typically done by the freshmen and sophomores who are still learning how to be adults. Those who are more serious and stay at it, get the partying out of their system early. And really, partying as a student is no different than if you work. Plenty of people with jobs go to a bar and party.

What makes college different from a library, is that a library is self study. That's not what you're paying for at a college. If you attend the classes and do the work you'll pick up knowledge, but that's not what you're paying for. What you're paying for is access to peers in the same field, and more importantly professors who are experts in the subject. A book can dictate to you, a professor can interact with you, and that interaction is worth far more than what any book can say.


Maybe not your hard work will pay off, but mine will. Im not trying to live life making someone else rich and paying off ridiculous student loans for a masters degree. Sure, right now im making someone rich working for someone else, but atleast i wont be skimming by paying off student loans doing it. But anywho, good luck!


Maybe, or maybe not. I wish you all the luck, but success is a statistical outlier, especially with a poor education. Even with an education it's not guaranteed. If you look back at my post history, even as recent as a year ago, I was absolutely convinced I would finish school, end up unemployed, and not find a job in the current market. I seem to have escaped that fate for now, but some of my classmates will wind up there for certain, it's impossible for some not to.

Also, I have no student loans. Never taken any out. All grants and scholarships for me. Plus a bit of out of pocket early on when I decided tuition was more important than rent.



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