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What is with Music copyright and You-Tube, I'm a DJ and having trouble ???

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posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 06:44 AM
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Youtube automatically scans your uploads for copyright protected music.
If your mix contains just one song that's one their "black list", your mix will get blocked.
Wether or not your mixes get blocked depends on the rights owner (usually the label)... Youtube only blocks videos if asked to do so by the rights owners. I'm not quite sure about this, but I guess they provide samples of the songs to Youtube which Youtube then includes in their search algorythm that scans new uploads. The algorythm basically works like the one shazaam is using to identify certain tracks.
Even if your upload makes it past that automatic scan, you still can get blocked if someone stumbles upon your mix and reports you for copyright infringement. I BOUGHT MY VINYL ???




posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 06:44 AM
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a reply to: theTonyStevenson
Typically mixes featuring more underground tracks have a better chance of getting through, as it's mostly mainstream/major labels that are trying to keep their tracks off youtube. But this is now not the case, if its on you tube they deem it their property.
Using more rare (re-)mixes / mash-ups of tracks might also help, as these are less likely to be identified by a search algorythm.
PS: including a set list might even make the problem worse, as it helps rights owners to identify tracks in your mix the scan algorythm didn't recognise. A disclaimer doens't help you at all if someone should decide he wants to bust your *ss for copyright infringement. I'm pretty sure that by purchasing the vinyl I have contribute to any royalty fee's ? Need a copyright notice disclaimer, please help ??


edit on 16-8-2017 by theTonyStevenson because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 07:59 AM
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a reply to: theTonyStevenson

Just because you bought your vinyl does not mean you have a right to freely distribute any part of any song made by any artist that has made a song. Look I worked at an isp tracking down RIAA and MPAA offenders. When you buy a song or movie, that song or movie is for your personal use. You are not supposed to or allowed freely distribute music without seeking permission, providing reference, or reimbursement for said music. You making a mix that has a bunch of songs on it, your supposed to acknowledge every artist and provide proof of permission. Possibly even compensation. The going rate on one song alone on the radio is 1 cent per play. Originally computer replay was 3 cents but it has come down to 1 to 1.5 per play. Anyway, that's the thought and logic behind why it gets blocked



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 08:04 AM
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a reply to: theTonyStevenson

Unfortunately, simply purchasing a track, in any format, doesn't give you the copyright or licence rights to make copies of and distribute another artists/labels material.

When I was playing club residencies, the manager was a paid-up licencee, which allowed us to play copyrighted material. Without this licence we'd have ended up being prosecuted. Depending on your area, one could technically be charged/sued for licencing breaches for simply playing music in a public space that's audible to others in the vicinity.

In a nutshell, when you purchase a track you're only paying for the privilege of listening to it in private - you own the vinyl, but you don't own the music. Sucks, I know.

I hope this helps in some way,



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: MerkabaTribeEntity

sure does, its ultimately self defeating for the music artist, back in the day people gave me records to play on the radio and at raves, and they made more £££'s because everyone heard their records. Do underground labels really want to lose their audiences to mainstream pop music, because that is where it is heading.



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 09:26 AM
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originally posted by: theTonyStevenson
a reply to: MerkabaTribeEntity

sure does, its ultimately self defeating for the music artist, back in the day people gave me records to play on the radio and at raves, and they made more £££'s because everyone heard their records. Do underground labels really want to lose their audiences to mainstream pop music, because that is where it is heading.


I 2nd that motion!!!!

I had a vinyl only Hip Hop radio show in NYC for 13 years.

For all of us broadcast DJs whom have "For promotional use only" stamped on our sleeves, and still have the servicing sheets to prove it:

How do we promote if you stop our podcasts? House gatherings? Really?

Edit: this trend was a contributing factor to the death of Hip Hop culture....
edit on 16-8-2017 by shefskitchen because: additional thought



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 09:29 AM
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a reply to: theTonyStevenson

By purchasing an album you have purchased the "rights" to listen to it privately not steal it and use it for a public performance of your own.

Radio stations pay huge licensing fees for the right to play artist music on a public platform. What would you say if I waited for you to put up one of your mixes then took it and cut it up and used your mix in one of my own ? Probably nothing until it made money then you would be livid.

My advice to wanna be mix masters is to purchase software, and plenty out there that is actually free and make sound alike of the music you want to use instead of sampling somebody else's work or pay them, it is how they make a living



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 09:36 AM
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a reply to: DJMSN

steal what !!! , ive been a dj for 28 years I have about 5000+ vinyl records, 15,000 + paid for flac.files etc, No one is arguing about an individual song and ripping it off, we are talking about a mix by a DJ that promotes the best of vinyl in a chosen genre, thus giving the artist more playtime and a chance for smaller artists to get their names on the ladder, instead we have YOUTUBE and major record labels taking all the money while churning out dubious music to say the least ...
edit on 16-8-2017 by theTonyStevenson because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 09:37 AM
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a reply to: shefskitchen

You pay the licensing fee...pretty simple. It is a straight forward fee for a public performance and can be for one time affair which would be expensive or a yearly contract, for radio stations it is usually based on their billing from which a percentage goes to ASCAP AND SESAC and the various other organizations of song writers guild's and musician guild's etc.

An album marked promotional use only is to be used inside a club which pays the fees or by radio stations whom pay the licensing fees not used by individuals in public performances...period



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 09:37 AM
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It is utter garbage. Facebook does it too. You cannot even upload a video to Facebook from say a family gathering if music was playing in the background there and algorithms catch it.

In theory if people want to censor events hell just play some tunes on the loudspeakers during the event.



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 09:41 AM
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a reply to: DJMSN

Did you negate to read the part where I still have servicing sheets, to prove the terms of play?

I totally respect that you're a DJ now, but were you a DJ in the 80s, 90s, 2000s? If not, what we went through are just stories to you.

Context edit:

Power 105 got serviced by the labels and were given terms. The labels also serviced individual DJs and gave broader terms, because they knew we played for audiences the station didn't reach.

Tony Touch would get party joints & Latin vibes. I would get independent/ underground. Doo Wop got the top 40s.

The papers state we are free to play under any circumstance, until the record is recalled. To this day, I have never even had a publicly recalled record, recalled.

Youtube is in breach of our servicing terms.
edit on 16-8-2017 by shefskitchen because: context



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 09:44 AM
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a reply to: theTonyStevenson

Unless you are paying for the license then it is stealing. The artist usually does not own the music nor the lyrics, they paid someone else, the writers and the musician for the right to perform it.

Contact your local music or writers guild and they will be able to help you on where you can obtain a license to be able to use music and lyrics. Just purchasing an album does not give you performance rights. The fees are not that exorbitant depending on what use you intend.

And you tube is not a very good distribution outlet anyway as it does not offer much protection as far as individuals being able to steal music without paying anything, not to you or to the artist who owns it



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 09:49 AM
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a reply to: shefskitchen

Read the terms. You have the right for limited public performance not distribution rights. And not for use outside of whole performance. Using in a mix usually requires the purchase of distro rights or even a different agreement between you and the writers and musicians. Again you tube as you are aware offers little protection against intellectual theft and is considered public so its a losing battle



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 09:59 AM
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a reply to: shefskitchen

I have worked in radio as of now since the 80's and the rules have not changed. Just because you have a record and sleeve proclaiming it as a promotional copy which would pertain to the radio station license does not allow for you to use it in public without paying for a license yourself.

And remember that you tube has a license to protect and a duty to protect the copy right of others which applies internationally. They pay for certain rights and I have no idea what all it entails but it would not cover you using the music without a license.

Again, depending on where you live big city or small there is a musicians guild otherwise known as a union and they could guide you or find someone who could guide you. You tube may even offer some sort of pay fee for distro rights to certain things but you have to do due diligence of your own on that but because of the nature of how you tube works it would most likely be expensive as each time someone downloaded it or listened it would be considered fair use and require payment



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 10:06 AM
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once again YouTube has control... the fight continues lol



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 10:09 AM
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a reply to: shefskitchen

Those agreements are still attached to the radio station license not you who has no license unless I am missing something. And since you tube is not part of any agreement you have then it places them in jeopardy. Perhaps if you are certain of your distribution rights and were to place your stuff on your own web site and did it that way you would be fine. Still believe it would be a violation since the radio station technically owns the promotional copies not you but you tube is not violating any agreement between you and someone else when you are using their service to distribute something to which they do not have the right to distribute it



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 10:10 AM
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a reply to: DJMSN

I am fully aware of the law pertaining to copyright .. it just seems self defeating when dealing with a mix in which only approx. 2mins of a song may be used at a time, and does the little artist no favours, I only listen to Underground music, nothing commercial either , its a joke



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 10:11 AM
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a reply to: DJMSN

Exactly- the laws haven't changed. The original terms still stand.

Your vague explanation of local laws which are covered by an inernational governing body (which is it?)- kind of lead me to believe that you have never been serviced.

You can put egg on my face though: what did a station/DJ have to do get serviced a next record? What consequence would you face, if you didn't?



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: shefskitchen

The terms apply to you and don't apply to you tube. They do not have the same rights as you. The rights belong to you as far as public performance in other licensed venues such as clubs.

Just playing a radio in your office or the clerk at the local gas station requires the business to pay BUM, ASCAP and SESAC a yearly fee. People often do not realize that playing a radio on your desk is technically illegal but is and they do go around to check and they do sue if a business is in violation.

This is why Wal-Mart has their own radio station which is played on the loud speakers so they are in compliance. Any agreements you believe you have do not apply to you tube. In order for them to remain complaint requires them to be party to the same agreement which they are not.



posted on Aug, 16 2017 @ 10:32 AM
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originally posted by: DJMSN
People often do not realize that playing a radio on your desk is technically illegal but is and they do go around to check and they do sue if a business is in violation.


Happened to a local coffer shop, they were playing Sirius/XM Coffee House channel, got nabbed and had to pay a hefty fee.

The cable company does this as well to make sure if you have a business you are not on a home use subscription.




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