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Gov. Matt Bevin publicly signs bill allowing Kentucky's public schools to teach the Bible

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posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 01:11 PM
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Actually teaching the Bible as a historical document that is just a small fraction of a longstanding literary / historical tradition, along with other established texts from an assortment of religions, is one of the quickest ways to create atheists.

There's a reason why most fundamentalist religions don't want people to actually read their holy books, and rather rely on a preacher, priest, or imam to "interpret" it for them. Once you see how they're put together, a lot of that blind faith is challenged, and often loses.




posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 01:12 PM
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it's cool, they changed all the characters to whites with blue eyes and blonde hair, and even though the time and era and hygiene available, all the illustrations will depict perfectly clean pale skin characters.

I wonder if we show what anthropology thinks what Jesus looked like vs what children or most adults think today , which one would they think is a lie.
edit on 28-6-2017 by odzeandennz because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 01:17 PM
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a reply to: underwerks
It's an elective class, and the biblical discussion in that class with just be a part of a broader syllabus, which includes things like poetry.

I'm an atheist, but even I can realize that your anger is misplaced. Christian teachings had a very big hand in forming our nation, from the reasons why people sailed away from Europe on their own dime to why nations funded things like the Spanish colonization of America. Whether you like it or not, there SHOULD be elective classes in our education system that dive deeper into a scholastic studying of the bible--it will allow people to understand a lot of the "whys" behind what our founding fathers did, along with other nations during things like the murderous and genocidal Spanish Inquisition, the "Holy Crusades," and the many other atrocities carried out in the name of the Christian religion.

Scholarly study of the Bible has a definite place in education--hell, a deep study of the Bible and Christianity, which led to the study of other religions (ancient and contemporary) is what led me from the path of a baptized Christian to an atheist. If your fear is indoctrination, quell that fear--without actual learning, which could really happen in a classroom setting versus a religious setting, all we are left with is indoctrination. At least give this a chance before you condemn what will be an elective course of study.

ETA: Please understand that my optimism comes from the stance that they will treat the discussion of the Bible similarly to how Yale does it in their two free religious-studies course here. If it turns out that they end up preaching in the classroom, I will be against it 100%.
edit on 28-6-2017 by SlapMonkey because: noted in comment



posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 01:31 PM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: underwerks
It's an elective class, and the biblical discussion in that class with just be a part of a broader syllabus, which includes things like poetry.

I'm an atheist, but even I can realize that your anger is misplaced. Christian teachings had a very big hand in forming our nation, from the reasons why people sailed away from Europe on their own dime to why nations funded things like the Spanish colonization of America. Whether you like it or not, there SHOULD be elective classes in our education system that dive deeper into a scholastic studying of the bible--it will allow people to understand a lot of the "whys" behind what our founding fathers did, along with other nations during things like the murderous and genocidal Spanish Inquisition, the "Holy Crusades," and the many other atrocities carried out in the name of the Christian religion.

Scholarly study of the Bible has a definite place in education--hell, a deep study of the Bible and Christianity, which led to the study of other religions (ancient and contemporary) is what led me from the path of a baptized Christian to an atheist. If your fear is indoctrination, quell that fear--without actual learning, which could really happen in a classroom setting versus a religious setting, all we are left with is indoctrination. At least give this a chance before you condemn what will be an elective course of study.


My issue is the place that this is being implemented. Kentucky. Where religious extremism is normal Christianity, people still handle snakes, and it's taught in a lot of sunday schools that the earth is 6,000 years old and dinosaur bones are a trick of the devil.

This is what passes for normal religion for a lot of people around there, in a state where taxpayers were forced to shell out $18 million for a creationist museum. To think that these ideas won't be taught as well is wishful thinking.

I'm all for a class that teaches about world religions amd their impact on culture and history, but that isn't what this is. Evangelists around there have been frothing at the mouth for years to be able to legally proselytize in schools, and now thanks to this, the door is wide open for them.



posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 01:34 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

Good point, it was when I really studied and read the Bible in my teens that led me to quit churches.



posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 01:39 PM
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a reply to: underwerks
I live in Kentucky, albeit Northern Kentucky, so it's a bit different.

I understand your concerns, but please note my added comment that I edited into my initial comment:

ETA: Please understand that my optimism comes from the stance that they will treat the discussion of the Bible similarly to how Yale does it in their two free religious-studies courses here. If it turns out that they end up preaching in the classroom, I will be against it 100%.

I think that we are on similar pages, I'm just more optimistic than you. Only time will tell, but if they get preachy, it won't last long.

I hate the Creationist Museum and the Ark Encounter--I live about 20 minutes from both.



posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 01:40 PM
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a reply to: MOMof3
Yes, organized religion, IMO, is for the birds (and not necessarily white doves with olive branches).



posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: underwerks

Understood. However "Unintended Consequences".

Once you open that door. Others can come in.



posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 01:49 PM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: underwerks
I live in Kentucky, albeit Northern Kentucky, so it's a bit different.

I understand your concerns, but please note my added comment that I edited into my initial comment:

ETA: Please understand that my optimism comes from the stance that they will treat the discussion of the Bible similarly to how Yale does it in their two free religious-studies courses here. If it turns out that they end up preaching in the classroom, I will be against it 100%.

I think that we are on similar pages, I'm just more optimistic than you. Only time will tell, but if they get preachy, it won't last long.

I hate the Creationist Museum and the Ark Encounter--I live about 20 minutes from both.

Ha! Where I'm from is about 30 minutes from Bowling Green. So you know what I'm talking about.

It's best to be optimistic, I agree, but with the culture there I don't see how this can't turn into preaching and indoctrination in some places. I can't think of one person I know back there who wouldn't support this turning into preaching.

Evangelism is the name of the game around there, and the fight to teach Christianity in schools has been going on for a long time.



posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 01:52 PM
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The reason the first amendment prevents the establishment of a state religion is because any time you mix religion and politics you get inquisitions and ISIS.

I'm not saying that will happen in Kentucky, but let's be real here, the CHURCH exists to provide a religious education. The public school system exists to provide political endoctrina...Ahem....I mean an education.

I think we all see what the problem here is.



posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 02:16 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn
To be objective, here, there are two approaches to learning about religion, one being a religious approach (what is learned in a church or from the religion itself) and the other being hopefully what is being proposed: Studying the Bible to discuss its context and origins at the time of its writings and how it because what it is today.

Not all biblical learning is religious. I know more about the Bible, the origins and history of it, and even its religious meanings, than many "religious" people that I know. Knowledge is a good thing, indoctrination is not (as you know). Religions indoctrinate, hopefully these schools in my state (commonwealth) will teach about it in a studious manner having nothing to do with religious indoctrination. I mean, schools teach about mythology and students don't come out believing in the Roman pantheon of gods and goddesses...



posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 02:17 PM
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a reply to: underwerks
Wait a minute...Bowling Green is nowhere near Seattle


ETA: Nevermind, I read "where I'm at" instead of "where I'm from."

I'm glad that you survived the Bowling Green Massacre

edit on 28-6-2017 by SlapMonkey because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 02:28 PM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: underwerks
I'm glad that you survived the Bowling Green Massacre


It will live in infamy.




posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

In the context of theological studies I can understand.

But I simply don't believe that was the intent.



posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 06:57 PM
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a reply to: Deaf Alien

I d'no..

(I hope someone gets this reference, probably not though)
edit on 6/28/2017 by 3NL1GHT3N3D1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 11:36 PM
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a reply to: 3NL1GHT3N3D1


(I hope someone gets this reference, probably not though)



The Satanic Temple


“It’s important that children be given an opportunity to realize that the evangelical materials now creeping into their schools are representative of but one religious opinion amongst many. While the Good News Clubs focus on indoctrination, instilling them with a fear of Hell and God’s wrath, After School Satan Clubs will focus on free inquiry and rationalism, the scientific basis for which we know what we know about the world around us. We prefer to give children an appreciation of the natural wonders surrounding them, not a fear of everlasting other-worldly horrors.”
. . .
The Supreme Court ruled in 2001 in the case of Good News Club v. Milford Central School that schools operate a “limited public forum” and that, as such, they may not discriminate against religious speech should a religious organization choose to operate an After School Club on their premises. Christian evangelicals — particularly the Child Evangelism Fellowship — have taken advantage of this ruling ever since. As it is illegal for the schools to discriminate against specific religions or preference others, After School Satan Clubs cannot be denied wherever Christian, or any other religious clubs, operate.
Source

See also: How The Evangelical Liberty Counsel Opened Door to Satanism in Public Schools



posted on Jun, 28 2017 @ 11:57 PM
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a reply to: pthena

Teaching children rationalism and logic thinking.
AAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRGGGGHHHHH!!!!!!
Now where are the crosses and onions?



posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 12:00 AM
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I must be the only one who thinks public school is a fundamentally bad idea to start with.



posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 12:09 AM
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a reply to: Deaf Alien



posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 12:11 AM
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well with all the stupid stuff the left keeps trying to push into our schools. Like having transgenders come and speak to the children it was inevitable that the right would eventually try to push their own stupid into the schools aswell. meanwhile serious problems go unaddressed or are clogged into a standstill by ego stroking. it's just ridiculous what so called educated people decide to take a stand on for public relations rather then tackle the serious but less emotional problems. both sides are getting petty and pathetic. as far as not being able to add or subtract by the time you finished high school. that's your own fault. you get out what you put in unless you're going to tell me there weren't any books and then I'd call your credibility into question.



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