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Gov. Matt Bevin publicly signs bill allowing Kentucky's public schools to teach the Bible

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posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 12:25 AM
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originally posted by: pthena
a reply to: Deaf Alien



LOL. Ok you win.




posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 12:41 AM
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a reply to: underwerks

Equality, that's what the people want, I see nothing wrong with this.



posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 12:47 AM
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originally posted by: Guardian10
a reply to: underwerks

Equality, that's what the people want, I see nothing wrong with this.

I'm sure the Fundies see nothing wrong with the elective classes teaching Islam on their dime.



posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 05:21 AM
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a reply to: TonyS

Thats the thing. I have no hatred for Christs people. I am one of them.

Most education systems include a general religious studies class, in which an overview of the most prevalent religions in the world, is taught. This class will highlight the differences between world religions, for example, showing the distinctions between Buddhism, Sikhism, Hinduism, Christianity, Islam and Judaism, as well as giving a little history on the origins of these religions as well. The basic concepts and principles of those faiths, will be explained and the anthropological effects on the societies in which those religions are most prevalent, will be explored to a shallow, but relatively useful degree.

In the UK, Religious Education was mandatory, everyone took it. Personally, I benefited greatly from learning about other faiths, particularly Sikhism, Hinduism, and Buddhism, because these religions, which were covered by the class, were the least similar to my own, and offered me a better understanding of a broader swath of the human race, than a narrow focus on the Abrahamic faiths would have. It also inspired me to consume information about lesser understood religions, like that which informed the greater majority of Japanese history, for example.

But there is a difference between an education which broadens understanding, prevents the discord which comes of the unknown, and actual preaching. There is nothing at all wrong with learning more about the people you share a planet with in an educational setting, but unless students happen to be at a faith school or a college for pastors, preachers, priests or otherwise, they should not be being preached at during school hours, or as part of the schools education program.

Like I said, I have my faith, and I am comfortable with it. But it ought not be taught in an educational setting as part of an education provided by a government which is secular rather than theocratic, and the Constitution states clearly that the US is simply not a theocracy. Given these factors, I fail to see how the program as described in the OP, can possibly be justified.



posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 06:35 AM
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a reply to: pthena

I was referring to this video.



It was a pretty vague reference though lol.



posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 09:11 AM
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a reply to: 3NL1GHT3N3D1


It was a pretty vague reference though lol.

Indeed! A one-liner from an obscure home edited by Bowser video.



posted on Jun, 29 2017 @ 09:36 AM
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a reply to: pthena

I'm still not quite sure what I just saw in that video and I had to stop a few minutes in to regain my bearings but it was definitely the most entertaining 3 min of the week so far.




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