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Should I lawyer up?

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posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 07:31 PM
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Last year, the place I work announced they were switching to a market based system. The office manager, who hates me, promptly changed my job description to vague nonsense and lower level tasks, against the wishes of my supervisor. Then I left for maternity leave. Upon return, I still do the same job as before.

On my annual eval, I described the inaccuracies and omissions. The head boss, above my supervisor and the office manager, signed my eval. So did her even more Superior boss.

Now, six months later, I don't get a raise. The bad job description rammed through indicates I make more than I ought. Ridiculous.

Should I find a lawyer? I just want my pay to match what I do.




posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: Look2theSacredHeart

I doubt it will be worthwhile unless the disparity in your pay is fairly significant since you will of course have to compensate your attorney.

If there is a demonstrable systemic issue of underpaying certain persons due to discriminatory practices you have a better chance via a class action or civil suit.



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 07:46 PM
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Good Luck!
Hopefully, the discrepancy in salary you expect to recover will exceed your cost for an attorney.

If you're in the US, check with the US Dept of Labor to see if they recognize your predicament, it may be easier to obtain representation if there are precedents.

Personally, I wouldn't bother. Too easy to get another job relative to sticking in the same job after litigation.

ganjoa

edit on 7-6-2017 by ganjoa because: Miss Spelling



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 07:46 PM
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a reply to: Look2theSacredHeart

What the august member said.

Sometimes you just have to accept that where you work really sucks.

Personally, I work for myself and find my boss to be a very personable good looking bloke with a sharp sense of humor, oh and he's generous too.



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 07:49 PM
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a reply to: Look2theSacredHeart

Easiest or hardest, depending on perspective, is to find a new employer. The amount of time and resources, not to mention emotional turbulence, will just not be worth it.



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 08:00 PM
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a reply to: Look2theSacredHeart

In Michigan we have the State Labor board.

Call yours in your state (if you have one) but hold on. As you can imagine this can go sideways. Are there other jobs in your area. Doesn't feel like you are free does it? (that is by design)




posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 08:05 PM
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Yeah, you can't sue your way into a comfortable job position.

You will be a target and be legally harassed until you quit or make a mistake and get fired.

I would keep your position as you look for a new job, once secure go defcon 10 by spreading discord an rumors through the other employees letting them know they should look elsewhere.




posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 08:09 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Thank you, and everyone else as well. The pay disparity is a few thousand, so not worth a lawyer.

I love my job, and my boss, so I don't want to leave if I don't have to.

Evil office manager is leaving. Maybe I could ask to have the job description corrected and my pay revaluated. Not likely to happen, though.



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 08:10 PM
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originally posted by: Look2theSacredHeart
Evil office manager is leaving. Maybe I could ask to have the job description corrected and my pay revaluated. Not likely to happen, though.


Successful people don't settle, ask for the correction and an increase.



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 08:34 PM
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a reply to: Look2theSacredHeart

Did you sign your new job description?



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 08:38 PM
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originally posted by: Look2theSacredHeart
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Thank you, and everyone else as well. The pay disparity is a few thousand, so not worth a lawyer.

I love my job, and my boss, so I don't want to leave if I don't have to.

Evil office manager is leaving. Maybe I could ask to have the job description corrected and my pay revaluated. Not likely to happen, though.



LOL, OK

In that case, you should display concern to your boss, then trigger said manager privately, then act really calm in front of boss like "what, are you ok buddy?" and take the management position and pay.

2 birds and all



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 08:43 PM
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a reply to: MotherMayEye

Nope. 99% sure not. I'll check, but it's not required except upon hire.



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 08:44 PM
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a reply to: Mandroid7

I'm not messing with that psychopath.

Plus, my job is much more fun.



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 08:45 PM
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originally posted by: Look2theSacredHeart
a reply to: MotherMayEye

Nope. 99% sure not. I'll check, but it's not required except upon hire.



Interesting. I've always had to sign my job description when it was rewritten.

Maybe consulting an attorney is not a bad idea.

ETA: There is NOTHING wrong with getting legal advice. No one but you needs to know about it and it doesn't mean you are going to file a lawsuit.
edit on 7-6-2017 by MotherMayEye because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 08:52 PM
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a reply to: Look2theSacredHeart

It is now time to put your emotions aside,
and try to analyze the situation from an
elevated point of view.

If you still believe you have been harassed or discriminated against,
and you have documentation, and proof, then you have several choices.

One, you can confront the situation, and demand adequate reimbursement
that you can verify with your superiors. Straightforward.
Two, you can seek new employment altogether.
Three, you can consult with a legal adviser , often free consultation to begin,
to decide if you actually have a case worthy of pursuit.

I would recommend that you consider these choices carefully, and take into
consideration those who depend on you.
The reason is this, I know someone who felt they were wronged in an employment
dispute, and went full bore on emotion alone.
It did not bode well for this person, and the individual basically
was blackballed in the community as a troublemaker.
It should be mentioned that this persons actions were really not
fair to The Company either.

So,
look before you leap.

edit on 7-6-2017 by Wildmanimal because: Add content



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 08:54 PM
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a reply to: Look2theSacredHeart

"Lawyer up" and sue them??

You really want to lose your job, go ahead. Sounds like they are already cutting back, looking for people to get out of line to justify letting them go.

On the other hand, if they are reclassifying peoples rank and pay then you know the writings on the wall. They always do that to employees when their bottom line is threatened.



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 09:06 PM
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Well, since you say you make more then you ought to ..., then I reckon you could always request a lowering of your pay.



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 09:55 PM
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a reply to: Look2theSacredHeart

What state??

If it's right to work you have zero recourse..

They can literally fire you for no reason..

Right to work really means the employer has no check and balance..

You would have to prove it is because if sex, race , age or sexual orientation..

Everything including "she gave me a bad report on her review" is 100% legal.



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: Wildmanimal

None of that matters if it's right to work. They can legally harass you as long as it's not for race , sex , religion or sexual orientation it's all legal.



posted on Jun, 7 2017 @ 10:06 PM
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a reply to: JoshuaCox

If it is not age , sex,race,religion,etc.
as Posted on the Wall,
then it is not discrimination .

So, what are you intending to call it?
Define harassment that would justify
a legal case. You hurt my feelings?
Slippery slope.



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