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4 stars visable in daylight?

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posted on May, 27 2017 @ 06:22 AM
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originally posted by: Davg80
a reply to: DJW001

wouldn't ballons be spread out, im asking because i dont know, but that would seem logical.


If they were at a high enough altitude, they may hav been further apart than they appeared from the ground.




posted on May, 27 2017 @ 06:30 AM
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a reply to: DJW001

Here is a picture someone else took at 23:15 ( After sunset ) around 200 KM north.

Not much to see.. but it seams to be related as the sighting trail and reports go from south to north that evening.

There are a few light dots in the picture without good reference. Anyway, better as nothing.

I can not compare it visually as my sighting was way sharper and with daylight and naked eye / optical lens.

Other or same sighting at night that evening
edit on 27-5-2017 by EartOccupant because: (no reason given)


Source
edit on 27-5-2017 by EartOccupant because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 07:42 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 08:32 AM
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Most star gazers with telescopes that can track celestial objects know they can see stars and planets during the day if they locate then predawn and track them after the sun comes up. Depends on their brightness; Venus, Sirius and Jupiter are brighter, so easier to see during daylight.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 08:37 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 08:45 AM
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Attention:



That's enough off topic discussion.

Posting about staff action or discussing other members is ALWAYS off topic.

Those posts will be removed.

Please return to discussing the topic of the OP.

Do not reply to this post.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 09:32 AM
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a reply to: EartOccupant

Then, certainly, we all should agree that the objects were unidentified and than, especially since there were three of them visible to two witnesses and the lights later disappeared (and as stars or orbital objects should have become more visible as dusk approached) they fully classify as being UFOs per the proper application of the term. That classification is justified in that normal explanations have been largely ruled out.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 10:12 AM
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The ISS and stars can definitely be ruled out. Which leaves us with man-made objects. I would have guessed that theese might be geostationary satellites glinting in the sun, but geostationary satellites are deployed around the equator.

So, most probably those were high-altitude weather balloons.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 10:44 AM
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a reply to: EartOccupant

Fair enough. No idea what it might be, then.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 12:18 PM
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Tnx so far for all reactions.

I guess we will not find out exactly, but it was rare enough to generate a few sightings reported on Facebook and some ufo sites.. maybe some more will pop up.

And it was also one of the rare days t the air was extremely clear on all levels not a single cloud, haze and even better not a single plane leaving more then a short "normal" trail! Outstandingly topped with that strange sighting!
It was a nice day!



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 01:28 PM
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a reply to: EartOccupant

It's "security". Nothing to see here. Move along.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 01:51 PM
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I remember watching a helium balloon go into the sky when I was a kid, until it was so far way I had to strain to see it. I then started noticing that I could see stars in broad daylight with a bright blue sky. I saw many of them. I was amazed that I had never noticed them before in daylight.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 02:32 PM
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originally posted by: craterman
I remember watching a helium balloon go into the sky when I was a kid, until it was so far way I had to strain to see it. I then started noticing that I could see stars in broad daylight with a bright blue sky. I saw many of them. I was amazed that I had never noticed them before in daylight.

Sorry, but it's the fact that you can't see stars in the blue daylight sky with the naked eye. If that weren't the case, seeing stars in the daylight sky would have been known and well-documented since antiquity. The most you could hope for, is seeing Venus, if you know exactly where to look, and see Jupiter with the help of a telescope. The blue daylight sky is just too bright to see stars.
edit on 27-5-2017 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 04:48 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace
The ISS and stars can definitely be ruled out. Which leaves us with man-made objects. I would have guessed that theese might be geostationary satellites glinting in the sun, but geostationary satellites are deployed around the equator.

So, most probably those were high-altitude weather balloons.


They definitely were not geostationary satellites. Those must be stationed out at around 22,000 miles. To far away for naked-eye observation.



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 05:04 PM
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A ballon probably, huh?

ISS hauls buns across the sky...the fastest of them all, seems

so not that
edit on 27-5-2017 by GBP/JPY because: Love ya



posted on May, 27 2017 @ 05:23 PM
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originally posted by: GBP/JPY
A ballon probably, huh?

ISS hauls buns across the sky...the fastest of them all, seems

so not that


High altitude balloons would be the most practical explanation. But they must still be classified as UFOs unless some source can be named that released balloons about that time.



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