It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Boeing's gets social media rolling on push for JSTAR replacement

page: 1
3

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 11 2017 @ 10:20 AM
link   
I was watching some YouTube this morning and an advertisement popped up in the middle of the video as they usually do. Normally I skip past these ads but this time it was dealing with something that I was actually interested in. It was an ad for a 737 replacement to the Air Forces JSTAR fleet and had links to a Boeing page with all the details Boeing wants people to hear about a 737 derivative replacement for the current 707 type C2 ISR fleet.
I can see where Boeing might think they have a good shot at the JSTAR contract. They currently build the P-8 Poseidon, that would share a large portion of the airframe and have most of the R&D done in terms of IFR and power requirements that a JSTAR aircraft would need. The 737 is a proven aircraft with a large global infrastructure to support such an aircraft and it is larger than the competitor airframes and would allow for expansion room.
The draw backs however are many. A Bizjet type aircraft that have been offered from Northrop/Gulfstream and Lockheed/Bombardier have longer legs, are faster, require smaller runways and are generally more fuel efficient than a larger jet based off a commercial airliner. Couple that with the DoD soured taste for Boeing's antics and delays in the KC-46 program still put Boeing as a longer shot I believe. But as in most larger defense contracts these days, it will come down to politics and who has the the ability to sway popular sentiment through social media.





Boeing's web site
edit on 11-5-2017 by Sammamishman because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 11 2017 @ 10:22 AM
link   
a reply to: Sammamishman

They're going to be hard pressed to win this one, considering all their screw ups in recent years.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:46 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

Other than that. I think the military is going to be asking for more than it should like more paratrooper planes from Boeing in which they either hire more people or lose their concentration on the civilian sector. Mind as will make all planes military style in the airport to reduce even more cost. That is the problem with the military. Building too much and asking too much leaving the civilians with leftovers.

Remember the military aircraft graveyards..
edit on 11-5-2017 by makemap because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 02:56 PM
link   
a reply to: makemap

There are just as many civilian storage yards too. If you add up all the civilian yards, there are more of their aircraft than the military yards have probably, and many practically brand new aircraft sitting there.

As for Boeing, they'll never move to the military. The market is too small and they make way too much on the civilian side of things to even consider it. Lockheed moved away from the civilian market at a time when there was a glut of manufacturers. It's totally different now.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 03:12 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: makemap

There are just as many civilian storage yards too. If you add up all the civilian yards, there are more of their aircraft than the military yards have probably, and many practically brand new aircraft sitting there.

As for Boeing, they'll never move to the military. The market is too small and they make way too much on the civilian side of things to even consider it. Lockheed moved away from the civilian market at a time when there was a glut of manufacturers. It's totally different now.


Why does it take so long to scrap those old planes? Should give them to the homeless or inventors and see what they can make out of it to save land space, money, etc. Even if its rusty its still usable. Some can even go to a museum. Lots of history and tour money.
They should make a giant airport museum for planes.
edit on 11-5-2017 by makemap because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 05:47 PM
link   
a reply to: makemap

Because they're being used for parts. The Boneyard in Arizona can't dispose of any type of aircraft until the last one is retired, even if they're no longer being flown by the US. They also sometimes bring them back and start flying them again. Almost 200 aircraft that were stored by various airlines were later returned to service, either by the airline that owned them, or after selling them to someone.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 06:54 PM
link   
It will be an interesting battle to be sure.

AWST did a article on this a while back.

The P-8 has had less teething problems than other Boeing projects and has shown decent reliability. I wont vouch for the accuracy but here is a website that breaks down the cost per hour of most business jets including the Boeing BBJ and its Airbus counterparts www.aopa.org... and yes the 737 would be more expensive to operate but would allow for more range etc.

Also while some small fields would be a no go, any reasonable sized airport with a 7000+ foot runway (not accounting for high/hot and those are the commercial specs) would be able to accommodate the 737.

You would have a bigger platform that would allow for additional sensors and links as well.

Despite the kerfuffle on the KC-46 this should be Boeings to lose



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 07:58 PM
link   
a reply to: FredT

One of the Boeing selling points has been more room to upgrade, but, and this is the catch, the Air Force is going for a common platform for JSTARS, possibly Compass Call, and future programs. That way they minimize their costs when it comes to maintenance, and they have fairly predictable costs across the board. They may end up with a couple different bizjet types, but they don't want to end up with a bizjet here, a 737 there, and God only knows over there.



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 08:12 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

I admit when I was thinking about commonality I looked at the US military as a whole and forgot that most of the 737 will be Navy in the form of P-8's with the USAF having about 14 or so C-40 etc so the commonality may be over stated



posted on May, 11 2017 @ 08:16 PM
link   
a reply to: FredT

It's easy to forget that the Navy is the lead on the 737. They were the first to get C-40s, and have the P-8s. They may surprise everyone and go with the 737 for the E-8, so they can get the Wedgetail when the E-3 comes up, but the way they're talking they want a mostly smaller, more capable bizjet fleet for as much as they can.



posted on May, 12 2017 @ 02:41 AM
link   


It's easy to forget that the Navy is the lead on the 737. They were the first to get C-40s, and have the P-8s. They may surprise everyone and go with the 737 for the E-8, so they can get the Wedgetail when the E-3 comes up, but the way they're talking they want a mostly smaller, more capable bizjet fleet for as much as they can.

Was going to say wonder why they didn,t go the Wedgie...



new topics

top topics



 
3

log in

join