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Have Raider II

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posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 08:37 PM
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Over two weeks, Lockheed, the USAF Test Pilot School, Calspan, and the AFRL demonstrated the Have Raider II program, using the F-16 Vista in flight simulator. Have Raider I, flown in 2015, demonstrated autonomy for advanced vehicle control. They demonstrated autonomous in flight formation, route following and rejoin, and collision avoidance in a manned/unmanned program. The Vista served as a UCAV surrogate, while a Block 50 F-16 served as the manned platform partner.

Have Raider II included the Vista aircraft planning missions requiring it to prioritize based on priorities assigned by the manned aircraft, figure out the mission with the assets available including itself, and dynamically replan the mission when pop-up threats appeared. The aircraft would have to replan the mission to minimize exposure to the threat as well as complete the mission. Lockheed even messed with non-verbal cues to the Vista aircraft. Non-verbal cues are often used by human pilots to signal formation changes, among other things.


Lockheed Martin Skunk Works has demonstrated autonomy for unmanned combat aircraft in a manned/unmanned teaming experiment supporting the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory’s (AFRL) Loyal Wingman program.
The two-week Have Raider II tests at Edwards AFB, California, involved the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School and its F-16 Vista inflight simulator, operated by Calspan, which was used as a surrogate unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV) for the demo.

While the Have Raider I demo in 2015 focused on autonomy for advanced vehicle control, Have Raider II involved “autonomy from a battle management perspective. We wanted to put mission planning on the unmanned asset itself, instead of having that capability always being locked down onto a ground station,” says Shawn Whitcomb, Skunk Works Loyal Wingman program manager.

aviationweek.com...




posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 08:55 PM
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Skynet ... coming to skies near you soon.

P



posted on Apr, 13 2017 @ 10:57 PM
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originally posted by: pheonix358
Skynet ... coming to skies near you soon.

P


Ya, can't wait til there are no more pilots in the skies. See how the American handle drone warfare against themselves.

If you not going to bother to train two pilots(One on trainer and one on fighter.) mind as will train no pilots.

edit on 13-4-2017 by makemap because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2017 @ 01:38 AM
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originally posted by: pheonix358
Skynet ... coming to skies near you soon.

P


We organics are no match for autonomous artificial systems. Should they learn to replicate themselves, it will be over for us rather quickly.

It's evolution, baby!




posted on Apr, 14 2017 @ 01:45 AM
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Glad you started this as I had a question and didnt want to start a new thread. What is the deal with the project name "Have" prefix for test aircraft?



posted on Apr, 14 2017 @ 06:54 AM
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a reply to: Forensick

You know that's actually a REALLY good question. And while we are at it, what about others like PAVE as in Paveway, Pavepenny and others.

Anyone have an answer to where these nomenclatures originate and why?
edit on 14-4-2017 by thebozeian because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2017 @ 07:41 AM
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a reply to: Forensick



In many cases with the United States, the first word of the name has to do with the intent of the program. Programs with "have" as the first word, such as Have Blue for the stealth fighter development, are developmental programs, not meant to produce a production aircraft. Programs that start with Senior, such as Senior Trend for the F-117, are for aircraft in testing meant to enter production


en.wikipedia.org...



The word PAVE is a United States Air Force program identifier relating to electronic systems. Prior to 1979, PAVE was said to be a code word for the Air Force unit responsible for the project.[1][2] PAVE was used as an inconsequential prefix identifier for a wide range of different programs,[3] though backronyms and alternative meanings have been used.[4] For example, in the helicopters PAVE Low and PAVE Hawk it was said to mean Precision Avionics Vectoring Equipment,[4] but in PAVE PAWS it was said to mean Precision Acquisition Vehicle Entry.


en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Apr, 14 2017 @ 08:15 AM
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a reply to: Forensick

Heres a link to educate yourself. If I can di rrooookiee here.

www.designation-systems.net...


Enjoy.



posted on Apr, 14 2017 @ 08:18 AM
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If you really have time to read just google HAVE GLASS that was the F-16 RAM program which started with block 15 l/m



posted on Apr, 14 2017 @ 01:49 PM
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Eventually pilots will have a jack in their head and will be in a virtual room like this commanding a squad of aircraft at once.

Safe and away from combat.



edit on 14-4-2017 by grey580 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2017 @ 09:38 PM
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a reply to: Forensick

Within the Department of Defense there are established procedures for the management of code words (classified or unclassified), nicknames (always unclassified), and exercise terms (also unclassified). To give an example of the difference, the SR-71 was known by the classified code word EARNING and the unclassified nickname SENIOR CROWN.

Nicknames (and exercise terms) typically include two words. Each major user of nicknames is assigned a permanent first word. The first word HAVE, for example was assigned to Air Force Systems Command (now Air Force Materiel Command), PAVE was assigned to HQ USAF/RDP, CORONET was assigned to Tactical Air Command (now part of Air Combat Command), SENIOR was assigned to HQ USAF/IGJ, and so on. If you know who has what, the first word gives some idea of which command, agency, or office is sponsoring the program.

Theoretically, the second word is selected at random resulting in nicknames like HAVE DOUGHNUT, HAVE COFFEE, COMFY LEVI, TACIT BLUE, BUBBLE GIRL, and a host of others. Occasionally, however, the word combination has an actual meaning. Following Operation DESERT STORM in 1991, the complete nose assembly (everything forward of the cockpit) from a battle-damaged MiG-29 was recovered by USAF intelligence personnel for exploitation under project HAVE NOSE. In another example, the Air Force and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency sponsored the development of the TEAL RUBY space-based sensor system that was designed to take advantage of two spectral bands dubbed "blue spike" and "red Spike" where aircraft IR emissions peak and where atmospheric absorption is limited. That detail was cleverly hidden in the nickname: teal is a shade of blue just as ruby is a shade of red.




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