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How Corbyn Is Conning The Miners

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posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 01:49 AM
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www.thecanary.co...

. . . breaking with previous leaders’ form, he backed their campaign over stolen pension money. He is the first leader ever to do so.


The British government stole eight billion pounds from the miners.


So how much have successive governments had to contribute into the miners’ pensions scheme, in order to take out £8bn? Absolutely nothing, is the answer.


The breaking of the miners strike, destruction of the mining industry and the theft of the pensions are political hot potatoes. Corbyn is set to become the hero by acting his part. He will win votes and power this way.

Corbyn did nothing to end the Islington abuse. This is because the institutionalised abuse includes the sex entrapment schemes used by spooks to control parliament. Corbyn can be relied upon to continue the cover-up of the sex entrapment scheme, and therefore hold parliament under the control of the evil ones. That's why they want him in. That's why he pretends to support the miners.


www.abovetopsecret.com...


(The linked story comes up as new news on google but it's dated 27 September.)



edit on 6 2 2017 by Kester because: (no reason given)

edit on 6 2 2017 by Kester because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 06:10 AM
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a reply to: Kester

I didn't know anything about this. This is from HuffPo of all places contextually:


HuffPo
When we think of people who are disadvantaged, marginalised, discriminated against or persecuted, certain groups spring to mind; women, those from ethnic minority groups, or those with disabilities. We seldom, if ever, consider that such a group could exist based upon an industry. Issues predominantly affecting white, working class men and their families are often overlooked due to an emphasis on other causes, causes which, while worthy, just happen to be more en vogue or high profile than others. Sadly this is the case for our miners. They took risks for us, many had drastically shortened life spans and/or developed chronic health problems directly as a result of working in mines in order for the rest of us to have the energy we depend upon to live our lives. Not just a bit of coal for the fire, much of our electricity still comes from the 9 coal fired power stations still operating in the UK and in previous decades we were entirely dependent upon coal. Yes, there are environmental concerns about coal fired power stations and we are well on our way to embracing sustainable energy as our primary source of power. But the fact remains - when these men were working in mines our nation was, for better or worse, dependent upon coal at not just a household but an industrial level


Our labor leaders always fall into bed with those that own us. As long as they''re pulling unjust compensation from the backs of the Rank and File they'll always capitulate to bull# that only affects the Rank and File.


source
An angry group of ex-miners who say they have been robbed of half their pension fund are urging Mansfield and Ashfield workers from the industry to join their national campaign. Ex-miners around the UK say it is a great injustice that their pension fund worth billions has been siphoned off by successive governments. Under a deal made in the 1990s, the Government agreed to underwrite the pension, but in return take a huge chunk of the surplus each year, with £750 million paid into Government coffers last year alone. The UK Mineworkers Pension Association for justice and Fair Play Association is campaigning to get the 50/50 split of mineworkers pension surplus renegotiated. The Mineworkers Pension Scheme said Trustees are committed to continuing to seek opportunities to improve the position for members. Former Thoresby Colliery miners Michael Newton and Charles Chiverton are official reps for the Nottinghamshire with around 50,000 former mineworkers affected. Michael Newton, 52 said: “In real terms our pensions have been slashed in half by successive governments - we have been financially penalised all the way to the grave.” “We are all in this together whether it is UDM or NUM - we are all affected by this. I want as many ex miners to sign up our campaign as possible.” He estimates the current pension fund of £11.2 billion has been whittled down by at least £8 billion over the years. He told Chad: “In 1987 they took a ’pensions holiday’ and British Coal and the Government stopped paying some £870 million for three years. “There were more pension holidays in 1991 and 1994. They creamed off a surplus of over £5 billion. “The industry was privatised in 1994 and they said it was in our best interest for the pension to be ring fenced . “There would be a 50/50 split in recognition of the scheme being government guaranteed. “The true motive was to take our surplus. “It was a very low risk pension for them - a lot of retired miners don’t live a long time so they got a good deal.”


Stuff like this is why it's so silly and destructive that a bunch of kids are rioting over a guy's words. Labor is the backbone of society. The abuse of someone's dignity is so much worse than offensive speech. Labor leaders are such a spineless joke that workers have to subsidize.

The counterparts of these miners in the states are the people that won the Rust Belt and ultimately the Presidency for Trump. I hope he realizes that.



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 06:10 AM
link   

originally posted by: Kester
www.thecanary.co...

. . . breaking with previous leaders’ form, he backed their campaign over stolen pension money. He is the first leader ever to do so.


The British government stole eight billion pounds from the miners.


So how much have successive governments had to contribute into the miners’ pensions scheme, in order to take out £8bn? Absolutely nothing, is the answer.


The breaking of the miners strike, destruction of the mining industry and the theft of the pensions are political hot potatoes. Corbyn is set to become the hero by acting his part. He will win votes and power this way.

Corbyn did nothing to end the Islington abuse. This is because the institutionalised abuse includes the sex entrapment schemes used by spooks to control parliament. Corbyn can be relied upon to continue the cover-up of the sex entrapment scheme, and therefore hold parliament under the control of the evil ones. That's why they want him in. That's why he pretends to support the miners.


www.abovetopsecret.com...


(The linked story comes up as new news on google but it's dated 27 September.)




Didn't the destruction of the coal mining industry come about because it was costing more to operate than the coal was worth? I know people like to turn a blind eye to that.



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 11:22 AM
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a reply to: uncommitted
Forgive me Kester for going slightly off topic.
The destruction of the coal industry was for one thing and one thing only. To forcibly take the demographic power off the people who worked in the coal industry. Or to put it into their nasty PR terms, to break the unions.
Cost of coal pffft. During the strike how was it cheaper to have the coal from Australia??? The Aussies had to be payed to dig it, it then had to be transported half way around the world, then to the power stations. Cheaper coal, I think not.
By the way they also bought coal from Poland as well. But unlike the UK both these countries heavily subsidized it's coal industry.
When I was made redundant in 86 there was projected 20 to 25 years worth of North sea oil, 15 to 20 years worth of North sea gas but 300 years worth of coal under our feet. Now if the government o9f the day had spent just a bit of the money it takes to build and run a nuclear power station on technology to clean coal fired emissions we would be self sufficient and have cheap electricity to boot. I could go deeper into community break up and government greed but I'd need 10 times more space.



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 11:35 AM
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a reply to: crayzeed

I appreciate the response and I come from a family that has been employed in coal mining across more than one generation. I think it says something that no government or private industry has since made any serious attempts to reintroduce underground coal mining to any great extent. If the required investment was minimal, don't you think that would have happened by now?

I could talk about both government greed (I'm not suggesting it never existed as part of this) and union stubbornness and greed (ditto), but maybe that's for a different thread.



posted on Feb, 6 2017 @ 12:40 PM
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a reply to: uncommitted
Investment? NO! Just who would they sell the coal to. They have gotten rid of all the coal fired power stations. The biggest problem which you rightly pointed out is that it's very expensive to mine coal, opencast yes, mine no. That's why every country with a successful coal industry it is heavily subsidized. The same reason is the cause of our railways demise. Oh, the railways are running but who runs them and takes the profits. That's the French and German rail companies, which just so happens they are nationalized, owned by their governments.
And the problem? Our government adamantly refuses to nationalize or even subsidize, except for private enterprise.
The railways and coal industry are one of the biggest losses for any country.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 04:32 AM
link   

originally posted by: crayzeed
a reply to: uncommitted
Investment? NO! Just who would they sell the coal to. They have gotten rid of all the coal fired power stations. The biggest problem which you rightly pointed out is that it's very expensive to mine coal, opencast yes, mine no. That's why every country with a successful coal industry it is heavily subsidized. The same reason is the cause of our railways demise. Oh, the railways are running but who runs them and takes the profits. That's the French and German rail companies, which just so happens they are nationalized, owned by their governments.
And the problem? Our government adamantly refuses to nationalize or even subsidize, except for private enterprise.
The railways and coal industry are one of the biggest losses for any country.


It's an interesting discussion when comments don't get too heated. Open casting might be cheaper to mine, but it's relatively expensive to restore the area post mining to a state agreed as part of the contract and the opposition to it used to be far greater because it's more visible to the NIMBY's while it's being extracted even if it does leave their buildings with no risk of subsidence.

For subsidies, personally I'm in two minds. I worked in a subsidised industry for 10 years and saw loss making on a huge scale. Seeing as ultimately that loss making is coming at our expense.

Our government(s) of recent times have refused to nationalise, whether they be Labour, Tory or coalition and there are multiple reasons for that I guess - the ultimate one for all of them whether you like it or not is will it win them votes. I'm old enough to remember multiple journeys on British Rail and trust me, I can in no way say they were by any stretch better than today. The butt of the nations jokes for all manner of reasons. With so many other things to spend money on and particularly with what could be a very uncertain economic climate in a couple of years time, I'm not sure I would consider it high on my list of things I would vote for.

Unfortunately, the coal, rail and car industries were beset with union issues and whichever side of the fence you stand, it would be a lie to say that either was completely innocent in the way they worked to gain advantage over the other. It's human nature that the government is always remembered as the bad guy, but that really doesn't paint the whole truth.



posted on Feb, 7 2017 @ 06:41 AM
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a reply to: crayzeed

Nationalisation is strictly verboten in political circles.
It seems MSM under instruction from those who really control things have successfully demonised the very concept of nationalisation.

Thatcher used the Miners Strike to destroy the power of the Unions and to start the process of taking back most of the social advances and improvements that had occurred after WWII - that process is still ongoing.

One of her criticisms of the UK coal industry was that it was subsidised by the government, the very antithesis of her economic beliefs.
Yet she showed amazing hypocrisy by buying in coal from both Poland and East Germany, coal which was 100% subsidised. To top it all both of those were communist states allied to the USSR who she allegedly passionately opposed.

She preferred to help prop up communist states than to assist an industry in her own country - an evil, evil woman.

The point is that since then there has been a consistent programme of ignoring and tarnishing the benefits of nationalisation.

We now have a situation where the vast majority of our utilities are French and German owned and all profits are being drained out of this country - a death by a thousand cuts.

And bearing in mind the increasing influence of political correctness in our society is it any wonder that miners, who are predominantly white, working class, Northern males, have been swindled by successive governments?



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