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Scientists directly image planets orbiting star

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posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 12:29 AM
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a reply to: visitedbythem

Lahaina is the westside.




posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 12:30 AM
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Hippies didn't bother me much, I was kind of one too



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 12:31 AM
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a reply to: visitedbythem

'stashe didn't quite fill in?

But exoplanets are cool!


edit on 1/28/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 12:34 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: visitedbythem

'stashe didn't quite fill in?

But exoplanets are cool!



Heres on Maui




posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 12:36 AM
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Off to bed, 12 hour shift tomorrow. Gotta be up at 415.
Enjoy your evening



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 01:17 AM
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Off topic does not adequately describe what happened to this thread.
However, it was fun though, and still thought provoking in it's original context.



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 03:06 AM
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a reply to: charlyv

Geez you beat me to it.. astonishing



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 04:28 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: charlyv




This is the real deal here... and the luck of being able to get a top-down view, that would have not been possible to detect any planets around this star using the eclipsing method.
How do you know it isn't a bottom-up view?

The animation is cool. The first observation was in 2008.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...


Phage is my hero.



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 08:20 AM
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a reply to: charlyv

That's so cool.

Sorry I don't have anything of value to add to the discussion. But that's so cool.



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 11:31 AM
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a reply to: charlyv

If the star is 5 times brighter than our Sun, and the planets are orbiting at 10-100 AU, then it seems to me that even the nearest planet would be outside the habitable zone. Light intensity decreases exponentially with distance. So is that a correct assumption?

soulwaxer



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 04:37 PM
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such a motivating time lapse



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 06:06 PM
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originally posted by: soulwaxer
a reply to: charlyv

If the star is 5 times brighter than our Sun, and the planets are orbiting at 10-100 AU, then it seems to me that even the nearest planet would be outside the habitable zone. Light intensity decreases exponentially with distance. So is that a correct assumption?

soulwaxer


Agreed, however they are huge gas balls that we see, which, if we know anything about such things in our solar system, may stay that way. The other thing is the resolution is so bad, that small, rocky planets could be there as well and are still in nebulae, so we cannot see them.



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: Phage

And you've seen Venus in the daytime??!!!

Hat is off sir!



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 07:11 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

Now we can all see it.


edit on 28-1-2017 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 07:30 PM
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a reply to: charlyv




We are definitely starting to get real optical images from exo-planets orbiting other stars!


Show me one such image of which they don't say it is not real themselves.



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: grey580
SCIENCE!!!!!!!!!!!

It's amazing how technology is growing leaps and bounds. Pretty soon we won't be just seeing planets in another solar system through a telescope. We'll be visiting them.

Well done.



No we won't, we aren't going anywhere.

Not even with this direct imaging,

www.planetary.org...


With current observation technology direct imaging is possible on on very rare occasions. It is most likely to succeed when conditions are just right, namely when a bright planet orbits at a great distance from a nearby star. Because of these strict limitations direct imaging is not a good candidate for large-scale surveys searching for new exoplanets. For the forseeable future directly imaged planets will remain very much the exception among known exoplanets rather than the rule. The method's importance today is as much psychological as it is scientific.


Indeed it is.

All they have to do is show some blurry gif with little moving lights and people are hypnotized by it.

Or from the OP article,


“The Beta Pic animation looked so cool that we’ve wanted to do more,” Wang said, explaining why the HR 8799 movie was made. “We wanted to make one that was even more impactful for the audience and could begin to show what one of these systems looks like.” I think they succeeded.


I think so too but you have a great audience.



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 09:23 PM
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a reply to: AttentionGrabber

They are the result of direct observation, however you want to negatively paint the achievement. Great science has already come out of it.



Wang said that the animation is based on eight observations of the planets since 2009. He then used a motion interpolation algorithm to draw the orbit between those points. Much can be learned from the motion of the planets, however long it may take for them to circle their sun. Based on the Keck observations, astronomers have concluded that the four planets orbit in roughly Keplerian motion around the star — almost circular, but not entirely.



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 09:28 PM
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a reply to: charlyv




They are the result of direct observation,


Prove it.




Great science has already come out of it.


Like pus?



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 10:50 PM
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a reply to: AttentionGrabber




Like pus?


Good one.
Hur.



posted on Jan, 28 2017 @ 10:57 PM
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originally posted by: RandyMoskovich

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: charlyv




This is the real deal here... and the luck of being able to get a top-down view, that would have not been possible to detect any planets around this star using the eclipsing method.
How do you know it isn't a bottom-up view?

The animation is cool. The first observation was in 2008.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...


Phage is my hero.


Did he help with the study?



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