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Scientists directly image planets orbiting star

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posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:29 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: InTheLight




I don't want my future generation living precariously.


In spite of our wishes, that has always been our fate. Colonization (of continents or planets) doesn't change that. In fact, those who venture forth risk more than those who do not.


I want the risk reduced substantially, I think the human race is grand.




posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:31 PM
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a reply to: InTheLight
Easy for you to say. You are one.

Grand sounds pretentious though. How about bitchin'?



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:32 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: InTheLight
Easy for you to say. You are one.

Grand sounds pretentious though. How about bitchin'?


They had better be more than bitchin to survive out there.



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:36 PM
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a reply to: InTheLight

They will be.

And they will find some gnarly barrels on those low mass planets.



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:40 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

JWST will not be optical. That's cool because the resolution will be unreal.

Keck shoots lasers into the atmosphere to minimize any effect (it is calculated into the image). The result is clearer images. Frickin' lasers!!! lol.

On the upside, they can link JWST with ground based telescopes to make virtual telescopes with even better resolution!

We are going to see even more of da universe than ever before!!

The next five years are going to rock!!



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:40 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: InTheLight

They will be.

And they will find some gnarly barrels on those low mass planets.


What are gnarly barrels? Barrels of pickles not liking the gravity?



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:41 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: rickymouse



So, they have a telescope that they focused on this star for five years to get that image

No.


A ground based image would not be able to get that clear of an image and even then the computer would be needed to enhance and position the image and actually blow it up.
You are incorrect. Adaptive optics are quite effective.

The thing is, they are very large planets, very far from their star (which is quite bright).


Is that the type of system we should ferry on out to, at sub-light speed? By the time our descendants get there, one of those planets might have a welcoming committee.



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:43 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Imagine surfing Jupiter!
Who knows.... some day!



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:43 PM
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originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: rickymouse



So, they have a telescope that they focused on this star for five years to get that image

No.


A ground based image would not be able to get that clear of an image and even then the computer would be needed to enhance and position the image and actually blow it up.
You are incorrect. Adaptive optics are quite effective.

The thing is, they are very large planets, very far from their star (which is quite bright).


Is that the type of system we should ferry on out to, at sub-light speed? By the time our descendants get there, one of those planets might have a welcoming committee.


Are you thinking of Twilight Zone...How to Serve Humans?



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:45 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

Too toxic.

I'm thinking a Mars massed planet but with oceans. You know why Olympus Mons is so tall? Low gravity.
Now, apply that concept to waves.



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:48 PM
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a reply to: carewemust




Is that the type of system we should ferry on out to, at sub-light speed?

Not based on the available data.



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:48 PM
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a reply to: Phage

People will come, Ray. People will come.



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:48 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: charlyv




This is the real deal here... and the luck of being able to get a top-down view, that would have not been possible to detect any planets around this star using the eclipsing method.
How do you know it isn't a bottom-up view?

The animation is cool. The first observation was in 2008.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...


its a front view. Cant you see the pastie star in the middle

edit on 27-1-2017 by visitedbythem because: sp



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:54 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Surf's up!




posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:56 PM
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a reply to: Chadwickus

Maybe I should watch that movie.

But here is the proper soundtrack.


Did I mention I'm goofyfoot?
edit on 1/27/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 10:59 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Chadwickus

Maybe I should watch that movie.

But here is the proper soundtrack.


Did I mention I'm goofyfoot?


Bitch'in.



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 11:04 PM
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a reply to: InTheLight

It just occurred to me that in low gravity the tubes will be rounder.

(Actually, it occurred to me a while ago.)

So...we are looking for a planet which masses about 30% to 50% Earth. Has a breathable atmosphere. And oceans.

Aside from being a haven, it will have epic waves.



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 11:04 PM
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It is actually a cool premise. What the dynamics of water would be in an ocean on a planet that has low gravity. I wonder what the lower gravitational limit is for water in a sea. One thing, probably tsunami's like nothing we have ever seen!

edit on 27-1-2017 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 11:06 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

The thing with a tsunami though, is not the amplitude, but the wavelength.



posted on Jan, 27 2017 @ 11:08 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: InTheLight

It just occurred to me that in low gravity the tubes will be rounder.

(Actually, it occurred to me a while ago.)

So...we are looking for a planet which masses about 30% to 50% Earth. Has a breathable atmosphere. And oceans.

Aside from being a haven, it will have epic waves.


We will call ourselves the people of the waves.







 
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