It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Codes and Policies for Research Ethics

page: 1
3

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 18 2017 @ 01:20 PM
link   
I wanted to discuss something, i came across something called;" Codes and Policies for Research Ethics"
Do you think its being followed?

The following is a rough and general summary of some ethical principals that various codes address*:

Honesty

Strive for honesty in all scientific communications. Honestly report data, results, methods and procedures, and publication status. Do not fabricate, falsify, or misrepresent data. Do not deceive colleagues, research sponsors, or the public.
--
Objectivity

Strive to avoid bias in experimental design, data analysis, data interpretation, peer review, personnel decisions, grant writing, expert testimony, and other aspects of research where objectivity is expected or required. Avoid or minimize bias or self-deception. Disclose personal or financial interests that may affect research.
--
Integrity

Keep your promises and agreements; act with sincerity; strive for consistency of thought and action.
--
Carefulness

Avoid careless errors and negligence; carefully and critically examine your own work and the work of your peers. Keep good records of research activities, such as data collection, research design, and correspondence with agencies or journals.
--
Openness

Share data, results, ideas, tools, resources. Be open to criticism and new ideas.
--
Respect for Intellectual Property

Honor patents, copyrights, and other forms of intellectual property. Do not use unpublished data, methods, or results without permission. Give proper acknowledgement or credit for all contributions to research. Never plagiarize.
--
Confidentiality

Protect confidential communications, such as papers or grants submitted for publication, personnel records, trade or military secrets, and patient records.
--
Responsible Publication

Publish in order to advance research and scholarship, not to advance just your own career. Avoid wasteful and duplicative publication.
--
Responsible Mentoring

Help to educate, mentor, and advise students. Promote their welfare and allow them to make their own decisions.
--
Respect for colleagues

Respect your colleagues and treat them fairly.
--
Social Responsibility

Strive to promote social good and prevent or mitigate social harms through research, public education, and advocacy.
--
Non-Discrimination

Avoid discrimination against colleagues or students on the basis of sex, race, ethnicity, or other factors not related to scientific competence and integrity.
--
Competence

Maintain and improve your own professional competence and expertise through lifelong education and learning; take steps to promote competence in science as a whole.
--
Legality

Know and obey relevant laws and institutional and governmental policies.
--
Animal Care

Show proper respect and care for animals when using them in research. Do not conduct unnecessary or poorly designed animal experiments.
--
Human Subjects Protection

When conducting research on human subjects, minimize harms and risks and maximize benefits; respect human dignity, privacy, and autonomy; take special precautions with vulnerable populations; and strive to distribute the benefits and burdens of research fairly.





posted on Jan, 19 2017 @ 12:41 AM
link   
a reply to: tikbalang

Do you think it is? Generally speaking.



posted on Jan, 19 2017 @ 02:38 AM
link   
a reply to: tikbalang

Very difficult to determine as you have not provided any context.

Who came up with these "Codes & Policies"?

To whom are they supposed to apply?

Every research organization is different and proceeds based on that company's policies & procedures, as I'm sure you know.

If you're asking if this is something that should be instituted "globally" that's an entirely different kettle of fish.

Can you clarify?



posted on Jan, 19 2017 @ 05:27 AM
link   
a reply to: Riffrafter

Its not a law, my question was in the beginning;" Do you think its being followed? "



posted on Jan, 19 2017 @ 09:21 AM
link   

originally posted by: tikbalang
a reply to: Riffrafter

Its not a law, my question was in the beginning;" Do you think its being followed? "


By whom?

Do you know if this is something that is known by many researchers?

Based on your post, one could easily assume you just made it up yourself.

Without some context and information the question is meaningless.



posted on Jan, 19 2017 @ 10:15 AM
link   
a reply to: Riffrafter

You could Google it and find that every research institution has it, my question was;" Do you think it is being followed? ". And if "No", why not? My question become, when does someone cross the line from reality into humanity, in the name of ideals.

Context is there, the question has a motive not an intent.



posted on Jan, 21 2017 @ 04:38 AM
link   
a reply to: tikbalang

There are always cases of people not following the rules. Even in my own institution, there have been high profile people caught out for fudging data. It isn't the culture of research to do this though, I don't think. Animal and human experiments are a very tough one to circumvent ethics codes on, because they are so highly regulated. Generally though, I don't think there is a case for pervasive ethics violations in the research community.



new topics

top topics



 
3

log in

join