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Your personal *word* foible?

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posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 04:41 AM
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A thread just for fun


Just been watching a programme discussing words that people disliked and would

rather not use....

Moist came up and then someone said that to them gusset

was worse!

When I was in sales a colleague of mine's personal dislike was penetration

which was often used as in "penetration of the market" etc.

Started me thinking .... ATS members what are your personal words of dislike




posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 04:47 AM
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a reply to: eletheia

From an aussie perspective,

I'm tired of hearing the word "plebiscite"

Kind regards,

bally



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 04:52 AM
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originally posted by: bally001
a reply to: eletheia

From an aussie perspective,

I'm tired of hearing the word "plebiscite"

Kind regards,

bally



I was hoping to dig deeper as in words that grate like chalk on a board....

hairs standing up on your arms sort of word.



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 04:55 AM
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a reply to: eletheia

i dislike the word "stinky"... always have but i don't know why

But i'll tell ya one thats not even a word and it drives me nuts...

When you see "bae" on Fb... or anywhere for that matter.

I frickin HATE that!!

People are so lazy these days that can't even finish short words... they gotta make them shorter




posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 05:10 AM
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youtu.be...
Sorry still can't figure out imbedding. It's Monty Python's take on the subject.
I really don't have any one particular word except when people started pronouncing schedule as shedule. I was in high school at the time and it really killed any desire to pay attention. You teach one pronunciation and then no now it's different. As I pointed out then why is this called a shool then instead of school.



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 06:47 AM
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a reply to: eletheia

If phrases count, I really don't like "sweet spot". There was a creepy sales rep I had who would use it to define the perfect ranges for their refinancing. It always sent the shivers down my spine (the bad kind).

Let's see... I also get annoyed when people answer questions starting with the word "so". As in "Hi Cindy, how was your day" and the response would be "So... I had this nightmare and yadda yadda".

"# show", "it is what it is", "no worries", etc.



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 07:33 AM
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The word thaw.
I keep saying things freeze, then unthaw, and then realize that's just freezing again 😕
I have to remind myself that it's "thaw", not unthaw....

I blame middle age brain freezes.....



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 08:22 AM
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When people use the word then when they should really use than. As when making a choice between two things. -I guess that's a grammar pet peeve. As for a single word it's CLOISTER. Expressions I dislike are: "Six of one, half dozen of the other", and "What not". reply to: eletheia




posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 08:25 AM
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Basically.

I detest it even more when it's used as the start of a sentence.



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 08:30 AM
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originally posted by: gunaire
When people use the word then when they should really use than. As when making a choice between two things. -I guess that's a grammar pet peeve. As for a single word it's CLOISTER. Expressions I dislike are: "Six of one, half dozen of the other", and "What not".


^^^^^^ Aw I quite like that one ^^^^^^^.... as in "same difference?"



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 08:34 AM
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originally posted by: SprocketUK
Basically.

I detest it even more when it's used as the start of a sentence.



Lol!! I do that often. Might have to stop it now that it aggravates.

I find myself often saying, and the bottom line is ....



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 08:39 AM
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a reply to: SprocketUK

That's reminded me - I dislike 'obviously' used in the same way.

...

And 'so' at the end of a sentence, inviting the listener to fill in the rest. So... what? Just tell me.

This one's stupid, but people who insist you can't say 'doggy' (for example) to their kids because they want little Aldebaran or Tweelok or whoever to learn to use the proper word - 'dog'. Cut me some slack, it's about all I can manage not to swear in front of them.



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 08:52 AM
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This will turn into a bit of a rant...so hold on to your hat.

Hillbilly.
Redneck.
Backwoods.

Each is meant to imply stupidity, backwards or "less than me" and are used as insults, usually by people who live in cities and can barely put gas in their car, much less do what those "ignorant rednecks" can do.
They think because they have a college education and sit in an office, they are "smarter". But,to be honest, the smartest people I've ever met are those same rednecks. They [ and by that I mean we, since I am one of those hillbillies ] have far more ability to do the things that need to be done in day to day life, than those who look down on them could ever do.
Sure, you can sit in an office and shuffle papers, have meetings and sit in your cubicle all day, but, can you...
Fix your own car? Can you change the oil? Can you even fix a flat or do you call a tow truck?
Fix your plumbing?
Build a house? Remodel your own house? And no, I don't mean just painting the walls and moving the furniture around..
Wire that house? Even fix something as simple as a wall outlet?
Weld a joint?
Grow a garden? No, your little window box of herbs doesn't count. Feed your family without a grocery store?
Can you actually do any of those things that I know someone is going to say "I just pay someone else to do it"
[ and then whine about how much it costs ] and are actually proud of their ignorance.

Fact of the matter is, those people who look down on "rednecks" are much less capable of doing anything that's actually constructive in day to day life and panic when they have a simple water leak or the car won't start.
Redneck - Hillbilly - Backwoods. Yes I am.

.... But then again, I'm not paying someone $100 an hour to fix my car.



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 08:53 AM
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originally posted by: berenike

This one's stupid, but people who insist you can't say 'doggy' (for example) to their kids because they want little Aldebaran or Tweelok or whoever to learn to use the proper word - 'dog'. Cut me some slack, it's about all I can manage not to swear in front of them.



Not so stupid
having that very same problem at present with a relatives child,



Is your spelling right? shouldn't it be doggie?



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 09:21 AM
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a reply to: eletheia

The only words that make me cringe, twitch, or visibly grimace, are the anti-cultural muck that butchers the English language and sews it back together incorrectly, like a deranged Nazi doctor. The culprits are commonly greasy faced adolescents on the bus or wandering about outside my store, taking NO advantage of the education they are being provided with, by saying things like:

Bruv
Innit
Bae
Reem
Izzit?

Another thing I loathe is the habit companies have of murdering and hyphenating things, for example "Drive-Thru". Buzzwords, street culture (or rather, no culture) language, and similar. All the words that can be found in a dictionary published between 1604 and 1990 however, are absolutely fine with me.



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 09:38 AM
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a reply to: eletheia

Well, I asked my friend Google and either spelling can be correct but 'doggy' is more commonly used for something I can't mention in front of kids. Hmmmmmm - I'm starting to see the reason for that particular objection.

I do know that 'relatives child' requires an apostrophe though

edit on 17-1-2017 by berenike because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 09:39 AM
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a reply to: eletheia

The above posters have listed some good examples of slang that I don't prefer to use. I suppose it depends on the setting if it would bother me to any degree or not.

The word 'moist' drives my children crazy so I use it just as often as possible.

If there were any use of words that have made me cringe at times, in the past, it would be when I am addressed as sweetie or honey or darlin' or any of those type of terms by folks that I don't know but, I've gotten used to it.

I just go with the flow and say it back!



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 09:41 AM
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originally posted by: eletheia
Moist came up and then someone said that to them gusset

I think I remember that exchange from "Miranda". Is that your guilty secret?



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 09:46 AM
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a reply to: eletheia
I would be annoyed by misuse of words.
The word "hiatus" means "a gap". My mother always used it to for a moment of crisis or contretemps, possibly because of a mental association with "high drama". My father would want to correct her, and that's why she did it.



posted on Jan, 17 2017 @ 09:51 AM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit

The only words that make me cringe, twitch, or visibly grimace, are the anti-cultural muck that butchers the English language and sews it back together incorrectly, like a deranged Nazi doctor. The culprits are commonly greasy faced adolescents on the bus or wandering about outside my store, taking NO advantage of the education they are being provided with, by saying things like:
Bruv
Innit
Bae
Reem
Izzit?
Another thing I loathe is the habit companies have of murdering and hyphenating things, for example "Drive-Thru". Buzzwords, street culture (or rather, no culture) language, and similar. All the words that can be found in a dictionary published between 1604 and 1990 however, are absolutely fine with me.


I agree with that, I personally believe the English language is a lovely language

when spoken correctly, or with an Italian accent ....
You missed out *Bro*

another pet hate of mine.

Those adolescents you speak of, doesn't it sometimes sound as if they are actually

speaking a foreign language?



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