It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Math Question?

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 10:03 AM
link   
I'm trying to remember the name of the law/rule for the following algebraic expression:

(I can't remember the exact scenario, but perhaps others will recognize what I'm getting at here)...

Two exponential expressions who are equal to each other, and have been raised to the same power, have bases which equal each other.

For example:

If a^x = b^x

Then a = b

What is the name of this rule?

Thanks!




posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 10:05 AM
link   



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 10:07 AM
link   
a reply to: JesusXst

I'm not seeing it there.



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 10:08 AM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Factorizing mate

When you make one side of the equation match the other.



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 10:20 AM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Reciprocal?



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 10:21 AM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk
I don't know the rule but...the equations on both sides of the equal must be the same.
So if you remove the ^x from both sides you get a = b. (Keeping the equations balanced) Whatever a is must be equal to b for the equation to be correct.



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 10:36 AM
link   

originally posted by: AMNicks
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Factorizing mate

When you make one side of the equation match the other.

And thats the answer. Basic Algebra 101
E=MC2
A2+B2=C2

Actually the correct name is factoring polynomial equations . If I can be an egghead about it





edit on 12/12/16 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 10:37 AM
link   
From the mathpage.com,

It would be the axioms of "equals" along with "the same operations on both sides of an equation."



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 10:37 AM
link   
a reply to: AMNicks

Well, that's ultimately the method used, but I'm looking for the name.

'Factoring' applies to all sorts of mathematical equations and expressions. This one is unique to exponents (and I believe logarithms also).

I know it was really handy to use when we were working with very complex variables in college and I used to have it right on the tip of my tongue, but I can't for the life of me remember its name now.



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 10:39 AM
link   
a reply to: Gothmog

No, that's not the name of what I'm looking for.

Factoring is indeed 'Algebra 101', this has some broader implications. Especially when working with numbers like zero.



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 10:41 AM
link   

originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: Gothmog

No, that's not the name of what I'm looking for.

Factoring is indeed 'Algebra 101', this has some broader implications. Especially when working with numbers like zero.




The only other thing I can possibly think of is the proper name in Algebra
Factoring polynomial equations
Factoring Polynomial Equations

Never freakin mind
Properties of equalities where 2 equations have the same solution
Crap . Forgot my High School Algebra. Hitting the books again after 40 years

edit on 12/12/16 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)

edit on 12/12/16 by Gothmog because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 11:16 AM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk
I´m not sure what you mean, do you ask for the name of the process when you reduce the equation?

It´s an equation. What you´ve done to get a=b is called reduction.



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 11:28 AM
link   

originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
I'm trying to remember the name of the law/rule for the following algebraic expression:

(I can't remember the exact scenario, but perhaps others will recognize what I'm getting at here)...

Two exponential expressions who are equal to each other, and have been raised to the same power, have bases which equal each other.

For example:

If a^x = b^x

Then a = b

What is the name of this rule?

Thanks!


I believe what you're looking for is the Multiplicative Property of Equality. But it's not really accurate in this case. In your equation, a=2, b=-2, and x=2 would make the equation work, although a does not equal b.



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 11:31 AM
link   

originally posted by: VictorVonDoom
I believe what you're looking for is the Multiplicative Property of Equality. But it's not really accurate in this case. In your equation, a=2, b=-2, and x=2 would make the equation work, although a does not equal b.


It would? -2 x 2 = -4.



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 11:36 AM
link   
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

If the ^ means the declaration of an exponent, then it would be -2 * -2 if X=2 and that would equal 4.
The above equation is not true for every value of a or b.

If x = 3
-2*-2*-2 = -8
edit on 12-12-2016 by verschickter because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 11:39 AM
link   

originally posted by: verschickter
If the ^ means the declaration of an exponent, then it would be -2 * -2 if X=2 and that would equal 4.
The above equation is not true for every value of a or b.


Good point, I did over look that since the caret symbol can equal anything and in this case I took as multiplication not as an exponent.




edit on 12-12-2016 by AugustusMasonicus because: Zazz 2020!



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 12:07 PM
link   

originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
I'm trying to remember the name of the law/rule for the following algebraic expression:

(I can't remember the exact scenario, but perhaps others will recognize what I'm getting at here)...

Two exponential expressions who are equal to each other, and have been raised to the same power, have bases which equal each other.

For example:

If a^x = b^x

Then a = b

What is the name of this rule?

Thanks!


From Google:




c = b. c (or ab = ac). If two expressions are equal to each other and you multiply both sides by the same number, the resulting expressions will also be equivalent. When the equation involves multiplication or division, you can “undo” these operations by using the inverse operation to isolate the variable. Topic 1 - Solving One-Step Equations Using Properties of Equality www.montereyinstitute.org/courses/.../COURSE.../U10_L1_T1_text_container.html



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 12:07 PM
link   
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Commutative property of multiplication

math.com: propery of real numbers

There is one for addition as well.

D@mn haven't thought of pre-algebra in a while! If you need help with third order recursion using Taylor series polynomial substitution or discrete maths, drop me a line!




edit on 12-12-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: grammar nazi



posted on Dec, 12 2016 @ 02:49 PM
link   
A Guess, 3.14159?



new topics

top topics



 
1

log in

join