It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Help ATS via PayPal:
learn more

Space Animals

page: 1
11
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 12:34 PM
link   
In reading another thread on here about Jacques Vallee and his theories I was reminded about one of my favorite aspects of the UFO-ET hypothesis, the events and sightings that lean towards some kind of interstellar animal. When I say space animal, I'm not talking about the dogs and cats and monkeys we've sent into space but rather a creature that lives and travels through space. These could be plasma creatures, some type of silicone based life form, or just what we would classify as extremophiles given our current understanding of biology and astrobiology.

I've had quite a few UFO sightings over the years, but only two were of (what looked like to me) physical nuts and bolts craft, the rest were either the fireball type or the glowing orb type of sighting. I'll relate a few below:

One night me and a friend of mine went out on his balcony to smoke, and as we're standing there looking up at the sky we both see an infinitely bright blueish orb appear from nowhere and then do a little zig-zag in the sky before vanishing into thin air. Whole encounter lasted about 5-6 seconds and I have no idea what it could have been. The skies were completely clear, no storms or lightning anywhere around us at the time.

Once in high school I'm sitting on top of Pilot Rock (basically a big rock that juts out of the ground in Kentucky, about 900 feet in elevation, got it's name because pilots would use it to navigate a long time ago) with the same person as the last sighting and a couple girls and I hear, "Look, look! WTH is that?" and I look up and there's a fireball about the size of a school bus probably about 100 feet in front of us, glowing and slowly floating. We sat there watching it and after about 10-20 seconds it burned out completely and left two trails of sparks in the air that slowly fell to the ground and drifted away.

Where I'm from there's kind of a tradition of watching these three orange fireballs in the sky that appear sometimes. The first time I saw them, me and some friends were driving down some back roads and we noticed them through the sunroof, so we pulled over to see if we could get a better look. We weren't disappointed. They would stack up in a vertical row, then the top one would fly to the bottom, then the next one, and then the next one would do the same thing. They'd do this a few times and then all shoot off at the same time with incredible speed in different directions. When I was in my late teens/early 20's we'd ride around because there's nothing better to do in the country and we'd probably see them 3-4 times a week. What was really crazy to me was after seeing them for the first time I came home and told my mother about it, and after listening to me she told me that her and my dad and all of their friends would sit and watch the same lights do the same thing back in the 70's.

What any of these things were, I have no idea. What they did do was send me down the path of thinking that not all UFO sightings are creatures inside of UFO's but are actually some kind of creature themselves. I also have some theories about how this plays into the whole USO phenomenon. Maybe some of these creatures use water to breed or rest, or maybe they simply need water to live as we do? Could sightings of these type of USO's really be some type of interstellar creature doing whatever it does with water?

I'd love to hear anyone's sightings or experiences with these type of things or your thoughts on what they are, their mode of transportation, or anything you can think of.

ETA: An older article about "Zeroids" bio-forms that live and populate space:
www.huffingtonpost.com...

edit on 5-10-2016 by underwerks because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 12:45 PM
link   
a reply to: underwerks


and as we're standing there looking up at the sky we both see an infinitely bright blueish orb appear from nowhere and then do a little zig-zag in the sky before vanishing into thin air. Whole encounter lasted about 5-6 seconds and I have no idea what it could have been. The skies were completely clear, no storms or lightning anywhere around us at the time.

For what its worth... My one time sighting with friends on a hill top was a blue light thingy that flew completely silent, impossibly fast, abruptly changed direction and disappeared into a cloud on an otherwise perfectly clear night.

We all saw it, did the whats it dance, too. I had the distinct impression it was tech, just not earth tech.

As far as 'space animals' did you ever hear Story Musgrave talk about that? I have no idea what he saw either.

edit on 5-10-2016 by intrptr because: bb code



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 12:50 PM
link   
a reply to: intrptr
Wow I had never seen that before, thanks for posting! And Sightings! I used to tape every episode on VHS when I was a kid.
ETA: That video made me wonder about the types of bodies some of these creatures may have, would their bodies be more snake or worm like or what direction would evolution take in a vacuum zero-g environment?


edit on 5-10-2016 by underwerks because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 12:54 PM
link   
Yeah some could be atmosphereic phenomenons, but I like the type of "animal" hypothesis too. I think a lot could be explained as interdimensional travel, rather than interstellar. Or, even time travel. Gray aliens look a lot like what a human would "evolve" into during long periods of space, larger eyes, bigger brains, and atrophied limbs from weightlessness. That type of "coincidence" is a bit much considering most people would never propose that when they first started being sighted. I like your post a lot though and it is good you keep thinking outside the box



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 12:59 PM
link   
a reply to: underwerks


Vallee wasn't the first to think about creatures of some sort being above us in the atmosphere and even space. We can't call them "animals" because that implies a biological creature, and these things might be, for want of a better term, "electrical."

One of the very early writers about UFOs and strange things in the sky was Charles Fort. Later, a fellow named Ray Palmer put out a rag called (at one time) "Flying Saucers From Space." He would go on at length with his editorializing on the topic of living things in the sky. But he provided little of substance to back his views.


Anyway, so why not other types of life forms? They need not necessarily be sentient creatures.


edit on 5-10-2016 by Aliensun because: clarification

edit on 5-10-2016 by Aliensun because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 01:04 PM
link   

originally posted by: JackKcaj
Yeah some could be atmosphereic phenomenons, but I like the type of "animal" hypothesis too. I think a lot could be explained as interdimensional travel, rather than interstellar. Or, even time travel. Gray aliens look a lot like what a human would "evolve" into during long periods of space, larger eyes, bigger brains, and atrophied limbs from weightlessness. That type of "coincidence" is a bit much considering most people would never propose that when they first started being sighted. I like your post a lot though and it is good you keep thinking outside the box

Some could be atmospheric life instead of space life, good point. Maybe one day we'll accept that not all life follows our definition of what "life" is or should appear to be.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 01:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: underwerks


Vallee wasn't the first to think about creatures of some sort being above us in the atmosphere and even space. We can't call them "animals" because that implies a biological creature, and these things might be, for want of a better term, "electrical."

One of the very early writers about UFOs and strange things in the sky was Charles Fort. Later, a fellow named Ray Palmer put out a rag called (at one time) "Flying Saucers From Space." He would go on at length with his editorializing on the topic. But he provided little of substance to back his views.


Anyway, so why not other types of life forms? They need not necessarily be sentient creatures.


True about the animal thing, I just used the term for it's simplicity. If any of this hypothesized life that fills the vacuum of space exists it's only right that there would be lifeforms a little farther down the food chain such as things similar to bacteria, etc. I'm reminded of the plankton found growing on the outside of the space station.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 01:11 PM
link   
a reply to: underwerks

great point and OP, I think about these things all the time.

in my mind, the kneejerk reaction to thinking about little green or grey men when someone hears about biological beings aside from ourselves in space is severely narrow and limiting.

the universe can be thought of as one huge ocean. as such, there could be anything from "little fish" to "whales" everywhere, and there probably are.

ever seen the Final Fantasy movie way back when? the beings they encountered on that planet remind me exactly of the types of animals you're talking about. not alive by way of physical blood, veins and organs... but alive nonetheless.




posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 01:13 PM
link   
Final Fantasy FTW!!!!!!!!



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 01:14 PM
link   
a reply to: underwerks

Where there is any form of energy for food there will be life.
edit on 5-10-2016 by SeaWorthy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 01:17 PM
link   
a reply to: underwerks


Right! We may be too narrow and exclusive in interpreting what we see and not fully understanding. Take what is known as "ball lightning." Conventionally, we call it a natural phenomena but nothing more complex than a local plasma that somehow was created and could last for several seconds or a minute or so entirely on its own.

Also, "conventionally," by a wider standard of that word, some folks would call it a UFO (by conventional UFO wisdom) which usually implies a probe used by the ETs in their "conventional" UFOs. But the things may be entirely something else not related to any aspect of our thinking (and especially scientific dogma).


edit on 5-10-2016 by Aliensun because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 01:20 PM
link   

originally posted by: facedye
a reply to: underwerks

great point and OP, I think about these things all the time.

in my mind, the kneejerk reaction to thinking about little green or grey men when someone hears about biological beings aside from ourselves in space is severely narrow and limiting.

the universe can be thought of as one huge ocean. as such, there could be anything from "little fish" to "whales" everywhere, and there probably are.

ever seen the Final Fantasy movie way back when? the beings they encountered on that planet remind me exactly of the types of animals you're talking about. not alive by way of physical blood, veins and organs... but alive nonetheless.





No I've never seen that but those beings look crazy. When I was a kid I remember watching a Star Trek TNG episode (or maybe it was deep space 9) where this species' star ships were live, sentient creatures and it was circling a dying star trying to commit suicide (I think?). To survive in space would mean whatever life form would have to be made of something that could stay alive in space, so it would have to be different than our terrestrial anatomy and biology. Maybe plasma life forms are what some fireball sightings are?



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 01:30 PM
link   

originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: underwerks


Right! We may be too narrow and exclusive in interpreting what we see and not fully understanding. Take what is known as "ball lightning." Conventionally, we call it a natural phenomena but nothing more complex than a local plasma that somehow was created and could last for several seconds or a minute or so entirely on its own.

Also, "conventionally," by a wider standard of that word, some folks would call it a UFO (by conventional UFO wisdom) which usually implies a probe used by the ETs in their "conventional" UFOs. But the things may be entirely something else not related to any aspect of our thinking (and especially scientific dogma).


Ball lightning has always fascinated me mainly because given the nature of it, it just seems like something "else". Especially the cases where it exhibited some kind of intelligent behavior like this one:
paranormal.about.com...

What's weird is the person in that story's father was almost trying to introduce them to whatever the lightning was, and told it to go away once it scared the kid.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 01:34 PM
link   
a reply to: intrptr




I have no idea what he saw either.

He has a pretty good idea of what he saw.

You see satellites. I've seen Mir go by within 28 miles; other satellites and you don't know what they are, but maybe just space debris. All kinds of debris come off space ships, especially at the back end after the main engines shut down and you open the doors: ice chips, oxygen or hydrogen, stuff dumped from the engines. On two flights I've seen and
photographed what I call "the snake," like a seven foot eel swimming out there. It may be an uncritical rubber
seal from the main engines. In zero g it's totally free to maneuver, and it has its own internal waves like it's swimming. All this debris is white, reflecting sunlight, or you don't see it. Cruising along with you at your velocity, it's still got its own rotation. At zero g, things have an incredible freedom. It's an extraordinary ballet.

www.jamesoberg.com...



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 02:06 PM
link   
a reply to: underwerks

I really wouldn't doubt it, but that opens up a whoooooooole new can of worms. lol, metaphysically speaking, if that were evidently true, it should make any scientist's hairs stand up.

would they be conscious?

are they permeable?

how would they affect the human body, both physically and mentally upon contact?

blows my mind a lil bit.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 02:10 PM
link   
a reply to: facedye

What if they can't make "contact" in the physical sense that we are used to? I think organisms, like somebody else said, they exist everywhere. We look on a meteorite and see bacteria, I think it has been proposed there are things that live near volcanic vents, and obviously things like mushroom spored which are only like 3 microns across can survive intergalactic journeys and radiation, along with a host of other known things... so everywhere we look properly we see life. Why shouldn't there be life places we can't traditionally look as well? That makes the most sense. I think if we had powerful enough telescopes, we'd see life... why not something human do not invent yet, "macroscope", I call it, for view higher dimension lifes.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 02:11 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage
Thanks for the link. What he says about only being able to see things in space the sunlight reflects off of made me think that maybe (if these things exist) that we need to be looking at other detection methods than just the spectrum of light we can see. Maybe depending on what these things are made of and their source of energy we could detect them using other methods?



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 02:15 PM
link   

originally posted by: facedye
a reply to: underwerks

I really wouldn't doubt it, but that opens up a whoooooooole new can of worms. lol, metaphysically speaking, if that were evidently true, it should make any scientist's hairs stand up.

would they be conscious?

are they permeable?

how would they affect the human body, both physically and mentally upon contact?

blows my mind a lil bit.


All great questions. In looking outside of our little drop of water for life I think we'll have to abandon our models of what we consider life. How do we know something is truly alive? Fire fits all the criteria for life but we only see it as a chemical reaction. Maybe we're right and wrong.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 02:22 PM
link   

originally posted by: JackKcaj
a reply to: facedye

What if they can't make "contact" in the physical sense that we are used to? I think organisms, like somebody else said, they exist everywhere. We look on a meteorite and see bacteria, I think it has been proposed there are things that live near volcanic vents, and obviously things like mushroom spored which are only like 3 microns across can survive intergalactic journeys and radiation, along with a host of other known things... so everywhere we look properly we see life. Why shouldn't there be life places we can't traditionally look as well? That makes the most sense. I think if we had powerful enough telescopes, we'd see life... why not something human do not invent yet, "macroscope", I call it, for view higher dimension lifes.

After reading a lot of Terrence Mckenna back in the day one of the thoughts that stuck with me was the idea that mushroom spores are the perfect way to seed life and sometimes consciousness (the psychedelic version) throughout the universe. Who's to say some alien civilization billions of years ago didn't just seed the universe with billions of spores in some last ditch effort to spread life beyond their own shores?



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 02:30 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: intrptr




I have no idea what he saw either.

He has a pretty good idea of what he saw.

You see satellites. I've seen Mir go by within 28 miles; other satellites and you don't know what they are, but maybe just space debris. All kinds of debris come off space ships, especially at the back end after the main engines shut down and you open the doors: ice chips, oxygen or hydrogen, stuff dumped from the engines. On two flights I've seen and
photographed what I call "the snake," like a seven foot eel swimming out there. It may be an uncritical rubber
seal from the main engines. In zero g it's totally free to maneuver, and it has its own internal waves like it's swimming. All this debris is white, reflecting sunlight, or you don't see it. Cruising along with you at your velocity, it's still got its own rotation. At zero g, things have an incredible freedom. It's an extraordinary ballet.

www.jamesoberg.com...


You've lost me Phage. You care to explain your comment, and the non-relevant quote evidently from a astronaut about debris seen in space from the vicinity of a space vehicle?




top topics



 
11
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join