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Space Animals

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posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 03:36 PM
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originally posted by: Aliensun

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: intrptr




I have no idea what he saw either.

He has a pretty good idea of what he saw.

You see satellites. I've seen Mir go by within 28 miles; other satellites and you don't know what they are, but maybe just space debris. All kinds of debris come off space ships, especially at the back end after the main engines shut down and you open the doors: ice chips, oxygen or hydrogen, stuff dumped from the engines. On two flights I've seen and
photographed what I call "the snake," like a seven foot eel swimming out there. It may be an uncritical rubber
seal from the main engines. In zero g it's totally free to maneuver, and it has its own internal waves like it's swimming. All this debris is white, reflecting sunlight, or you don't see it. Cruising along with you at your velocity, it's still got its own rotation. At zero g, things have an incredible freedom. It's an extraordinary ballet.

www.jamesoberg.com...


You've lost me Phage. You care to explain your comment, and the non-relevant quote evidently from a astronaut about debris seen in space from the vicinity of a space vehicle?


The 'snakes' that Musgrave likes to amuse his audiences with are, in hos own words, probably just structural material from his own spacecraft that look weird because they are wiggling in a zero-G vacuum after coming loose. He's seen such an object on two flights -- both shortly after he deployed a large payload using pyrotechnic guillotines to release tie-down straps. Duh.




posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 04:21 PM
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Not a single mention of space whales. Dissapointed ats.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 04:26 PM
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a reply to: JimOberg


But Oberg , new to the thread in mid-stream, you respond to an off-topic, derailing of the thread by Phage and now you are doing it.

What we have been discussing does not bear any resemblance to HARDWARE witnessed by an astronaut while in space looking in the near vicinity of a space object.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 04:38 PM
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a reply to: Aliensun

It's referring to a video POSTED in the thread which either YOU have missed or your the one derailing the thread



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 04:45 PM
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Okay, but where's the alien poop? If they're alive, that generally means they poop, and something other than plasma. Angel hair?



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 04:47 PM
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originally posted by: wmd_2008
a reply to: Aliensun

It's referring to a video POSTED in the thread which either YOU have missed or your the one derailing the thread




Maybe you need to start at the beginning of the thread and follow it through AND to ignore those responses that are not relative to the main which, intentional or not, are efforts to move the topic away from the OP. Can you get that?



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 04:49 PM
link   

originally posted by: JimOberg

originally posted by: Aliensun

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: intrptr




I have no idea what he saw either.

He has a pretty good idea of what he saw.

You see satellites. I've seen Mir go by within 28 miles; other satellites and you don't know what they are, but maybe just space debris. All kinds of debris come off space ships, especially at the back end after the main engines shut down and you open the doors: ice chips, oxygen or hydrogen, stuff dumped from the engines. On two flights I've seen and
photographed what I call "the snake," like a seven foot eel swimming out there. It may be an uncritical rubber
seal from the main engines. In zero g it's totally free to maneuver, and it has its own internal waves like it's swimming. All this debris is white, reflecting sunlight, or you don't see it. Cruising along with you at your velocity, it's still got its own rotation. At zero g, things have an incredible freedom. It's an extraordinary ballet.

www.jamesoberg.com...


You've lost me Phage. You care to explain your comment, and the non-relevant quote evidently from a astronaut about debris seen in space from the vicinity of a space vehicle?


The 'snakes' that Musgrave likes to amuse his audiences with are, in hos own words, probably just structural material from his own spacecraft that look weird because they are wiggling in a zero-G vacuum after coming loose. He's seen such an object on two flights -- both shortly after he deployed a large payload using pyrotechnic guillotines to release tie-down straps. Duh.

Thanks for the explanation. The key word to me here is probably. If what he saw are pieces of the shuttle that came loose it shouldn't be too hard to identify what they are and where on the shuttle they came from.
edit on 5-10-2016 by underwerks because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 04:51 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Okay, but where's the alien poop? If they're alive, that generally means they poop, and something other than plasma. Angel hair?


I question your fascination about alien poop, but your suggestion about "angel hair" is really thought provoking.
I mean it. That is an aspect of weird aerial phenomena that has never been satisfactorily explained by masses of airborne spider tendrils.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 04:57 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
Okay, but where's the alien poop? If they're alive, that generally means they poop, and something other than plasma. Angel hair?

All those strange fish falls from the sky? Yep. Aliens poop fish. Now you know.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 05:10 PM
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a reply to: underwerks


Charles Fort spent his days in the New York Public Library during the 1920s reading scientific texts, correspondence and daily newspapers from around the world. His interest was to report the unreported, unrecognized, ignored, and disbelieved. His works are still popular as they are timeless. The Fortean Society named after his efforts has been around for a long time.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 05:51 PM
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Did you read this thread? Tardigrade DNA inserted into human cells gives them X-ray resistance.

Seems spores can also survive the vacuum of space (Terrence McKenna's mushroom theory. Psychedelic mushrooms just kind of showed up in the fossil record. He thinks that they come from outer space). Those tardigrade (almost TARDIS! Is that close enough to a space whale GemmyMcGemJew?) can survive the vacuum as well.

Some scientists have almost convinced themselves that the octopus (and cephalopod in general) could be alien creature to this planet.

I would guess that it would be more jellyfish-like if there are any space animals.

We would need a Betazoid to talk to it of course ("Pain. Incredible pain" *tears streaming down face")



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 05:59 PM
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originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
Some scientists have almost convinced themselves that the octopus (and cephalopod in general) could be alien creature to this planet.

Also the Venus Fly Trap.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: Phage

a reply to: JimOberg

Thanks guys. Never heard his further explanation before, just the first part about a 'snake' sitting there, looking at him.

To the thread: Phage and James Oberg are well respected residents. They are careful to offer their learned opinions backed with links, always welcomed.
edit on 5-10-2016 by intrptr because: Additional



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 06:16 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

You learn something new every day! Thanks for that tidbit.

[ETA: There was some microbial (??) creature on the outside of ISIS that was also found. Forgot about that one]

 


I wonder if we would recognize a "space animal" if we saw one. Your conceptual self is defined by language and experience so if there is something outside of both... could you even explain in some manner the TRULY other? Very interesting concept: space animal.

Like, if it lives in space what does it eat? Does it feed off of light or something we can't even understand? Is it made of regular matter or dark matter? The description of life: consume, reproduce, survive. Huh...




edit on 5-10-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: slow brain day



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 06:23 PM
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a reply to: underwerks


ETA: That video made me wonder about the types of bodies some of these creatures may have, would their bodies be more snake or worm like or what direction would evolution take in a vacuum zero-g environment?

More machine like you ask me. Like us, we're in outer space but can't exist in vacuum without machines.

As far as the snake story, Phage and Jim Oberg, when they take the time to reply, respect what they have to say.

imo



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 06:29 PM
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originally posted by: underwerks

originally posted by: JimOberg

originally posted by: Aliensun

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: intrptr




I have no idea what he saw either.

He has a pretty good idea of what he saw.

You see satellites. I've seen Mir go by within 28 miles; other satellites and you don't know what they are, but maybe just space debris. All kinds of debris come off space ships, especially at the back end after the main engines shut down and you open the doors: ice chips, oxygen or hydrogen, stuff dumped from the engines. On two flights I've seen and
photographed what I call "the snake," like a seven foot eel swimming out there. It may be an uncritical rubber
seal from the main engines. In zero g it's totally free to maneuver, and it has its own internal waves like it's swimming. All this debris is white, reflecting sunlight, or you don't see it. Cruising along with you at your velocity, it's still got its own rotation. At zero g, things have an incredible freedom. It's an extraordinary ballet.

www.jamesoberg.com...


You've lost me Phage. You care to explain your comment, and the non-relevant quote evidently from a astronaut about debris seen in space from the vicinity of a space vehicle?


The 'snakes' that Musgrave likes to amuse his audiences with are, in hos own words, probably just structural material from his own spacecraft that look weird because they are wiggling in a zero-G vacuum after coming loose. He's seen such an object on two flights -- both shortly after he deployed a large payload using pyrotechnic guillotines to release tie-down straps. Duh.

Thanks for the explanation. The key word to me here is probably. If what he saw are pieces of the shuttle that came loose it shouldn't be too hard to identify what they are and where on the shuttle they came from.


Not really -- when stuff like gap-filler strips are missing back on Earth [and a lot do come off] nobody can tell WHEN they came off, in orbit or ascent or reentry. Ditto with hold-down straps on jettisoned payloads, especially the heavy IUS rocket stage which was a real elephant-in-the-room to deploy. It's not the paucity of candidate strips of stuff, it's the over-abundance, that makes certainty impossible.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 06:35 PM
link   
a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF




[ETA: There was some microbial (??) creature on the outside of ISIS that was also found. Forgot about that one]

Well that explains lot.
ISIS has been infected with an alien microbe which is controlling their thoughts.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 06:37 PM
link   

originally posted by: JimOberg

originally posted by: underwerks

originally posted by: JimOberg

originally posted by: Aliensun

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: intrptr




I have no idea what he saw either.

He has a pretty good idea of what he saw.

You see satellites. I've seen Mir go by within 28 miles; other satellites and you don't know what they are, but maybe just space debris. All kinds of debris come off space ships, especially at the back end after the main engines shut down and you open the doors: ice chips, oxygen or hydrogen, stuff dumped from the engines. On two flights I've seen and
photographed what I call "the snake," like a seven foot eel swimming out there. It may be an uncritical rubber
seal from the main engines. In zero g it's totally free to maneuver, and it has its own internal waves like it's swimming. All this debris is white, reflecting sunlight, or you don't see it. Cruising along with you at your velocity, it's still got its own rotation. At zero g, things have an incredible freedom. It's an extraordinary ballet.

www.jamesoberg.com...


You've lost me Phage. You care to explain your comment, and the non-relevant quote evidently from a astronaut about debris seen in space from the vicinity of a space vehicle?


The 'snakes' that Musgrave likes to amuse his audiences with are, in hos own words, probably just structural material from his own spacecraft that look weird because they are wiggling in a zero-G vacuum after coming loose. He's seen such an object on two flights -- both shortly after he deployed a large payload using pyrotechnic guillotines to release tie-down straps. Duh.

Thanks for the explanation. The key word to me here is probably. If what he saw are pieces of the shuttle that came loose it shouldn't be too hard to identify what they are and where on the shuttle they came from.


Not really -- when stuff like gap-filler strips are missing back on Earth [and a lot do come off] nobody can tell WHEN they came off, in orbit or ascent or reentry. Ditto with hold-down straps on jettisoned payloads, especially the heavy IUS rocket stage which was a real elephant-in-the-room to deploy. It's not the paucity of candidate strips of stuff, it's the over-abundance, that makes certainty impossible.

That makes sense. And to think about it I doubt any type of space organism we would encounter would look like anything we have here on earth (snake-like, worm like etc).



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 06:46 PM
link   

originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
Did you read this thread? Tardigrade DNA inserted into human cells gives them X-ray resistance.

Seems spores can also survive the vacuum of space (Terrence McKenna's mushroom theory. Psychedelic mushrooms just kind of showed up in the fossil record. He thinks that they come from outer space). Those tardigrade (almost TARDIS! Is that close enough to a space whale GemmyMcGemJew?) can survive the vacuum as well.

Some scientists have almost convinced themselves that the octopus (and cephalopod in general) could be alien creature to this planet.

I would guess that it would be more jellyfish-like if there are any space animals.

We would need a Betazoid to talk to it of course ("Pain. Incredible pain" *tears streaming down face")

Also marijuana may be a space plant, as it is the only known plant with male and female.



posted on Oct, 5 2016 @ 06:49 PM
link   
a reply to: JackKcaj




Also marijuana may be a space plant, as it is the only known plant with male and female.

Utter nonsense.
www.google.com...
edit on 10/5/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)




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