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Edible nano-coating that can preserve foods gets patented

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posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 02:39 PM
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a reply to: artistpoet

But Monsanto knew they were onto a loser through public opinion
Organic is a loser?
www.wired.com...



A rose by any other name is still a rose or a Monsanto

The purchase has yet to be approved. It may not be allowed.
www.wsj.com...
 

But what does this have to do with the topic?

edit on 10/2/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 02:44 PM
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But what does this have to do with the coating which is the topic?
a reply to: Phage

Thanks for the info ... I am pleasently surprised

Is the coating Organic?



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 02:50 PM
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a reply to: artistpoet

You mean is it composed of hydrocarbons?
I don't know, but it would seem likely. I'm looking for the actual patent.



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 02:53 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Appreciate your input

Edit to add ... I had to look up what hydrocarbons are
So Yes is my answer to your question


edit on 2-10-2016 by artistpoet because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 03:01 PM
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a reply to: artistpoet
The patent was issued in 2014

It seems the coating is based on edible wax (carnuba palm, among others) nanoparticles. The particles may enclose:

The actives may be polyphenols, vitamin E, lycopene, β-carotene, essential oils, and the like; controlled release of these substances during storage and consumption results in conservation of nutritional even nutraceutical properties featured in the fruit or green vegetable, since consumer's health and nutrition are benefited by conserving the features of a well-developed product (fruit).

www.google.com...

edit on 10/2/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: artistpoet

Er.. you do realise that organic produce is treated with "chemicals", right?


Myth #1: Organic Farms Don't Use Pesticides
Myth #2: Organic Foods are Healthier
Myth #3: Organic Farming Is Better For The Environment


blogs.scientificamerican.com... culture/



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Thank you Phage for the information

I know edible wax is used on some fruits in UK stores

I know this is a new product ... you have allayed my pre set bias/fears

However ... I help grow Organic fruits and vegetables so see no personal need for this new product



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 03:28 PM
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a reply to: GetHyped
sorry treble post


edit on 2-10-2016 by artistpoet because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 03:28 PM
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a reply to: GetHyped

Sorry treble post


edit on 2-10-2016 by artistpoet because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 03:28 PM
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a reply to: GetHyped

Not when I am growing them



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 03:31 PM
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a reply to: artistpoet

You can't exactly make blanket statements about organic produce, then.



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 03:31 PM
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a reply to: GetHyped

I got a 404 using your link
Are you in USA
I am in UK



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: GetHyped

You are right ... if the same applies to UK

However I grow pesticide free



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 03:38 PM
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a reply to: artistpoet

ATS doesn't seem to like long urls, try this:

Link



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: GetHyped

Thanks for link but it is for USA not UK

Here are a couple links related to Britain where I live

It does indeed mention that a minimal amount of chemicals are allowed
Such as Copper Sulphate in the production of Potato
To help avoid Potato Blight

news.bbc.co.uk...

ofgorganic.org...




edit on 2-10-2016 by artistpoet because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 04:14 PM
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a reply to: artistpoet

The pesticides used in organic farming are actually more toxic:


Myth one: Organic farming is good for the environment

The study of Life Cycle Assessments (LCAs) for the UK, sponsored by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, should concern anyone who buys organic. It shows that milk and dairy production is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs). A litre of organic milk requires 80 per cent more land than conventional milk to produce, has 20 per cent greater global warming potential, releases 60 per cent more nutrients to water sources, and contributes 70 per cent more to acid rain.

Also, organically reared cows burp twice as much methane as conventionally reared cattle – and methane is 20 times more powerful a greenhouse gas than CO2. Meat and poultry are the largest agricultural contributors to GHG emissions. LCA assessment counts the energy used to manufacture pesticide for growing cattle feed, but still shows that a kilo of organic beef releases 12 per cent more GHGs, causes twice as much nutrient pollution and more acid rain.

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) relates food production to: energy required to manufacture artificial fertilisers and pesticides; fossil fuel burnt by farm equipment; nutrient pollution caused by nitrate and phosphate run-off into water courses; release of gases that cause acid rain; and the area of land farmed. A similar review by the University of Hohenheim, Germany, in 2000 reached the same conclusions (Hohenheim is a proponent of organic farming and quoted by the Soil Association).

Myth three: Organic farming doesn't use pesticides

Food scares are always good news for the organic food industry. The Soil Association and other organic farming trade groups say conventional food must be unhealthy because farmers use pesticides. Actually, organic farmers also use pesticides. The difference is that "organic" pesticides are so dangerous that they have been "grandfathered" with current regulations and do not have to pass stringent modern safety tests.

For example, organic farmers can treat fungal diseases with copper solutions. Unlike modern, biodegradable, pesticides copper stays toxic in the soil for ever. The organic insecticide rotenone (in derris) is highly neurotoxic to humans – exposure can cause Parkinson's disease. But none of these "natural" chemicals is a reason not to buy organic food; nor are the man-made chemicals used in conventional farming.


Link



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: GetHyped

Well that is interesting and eye opening

Personally

I do not eat any dairy products or meat
I grow chemical free produce on a small scale

Years ago I helped grow crops Organically/Chemical Free on a larger scale
As an experiment in self suffiency with 30 or so people successfully

You live and learn I guess








edit on 2-10-2016 by artistpoet because: typos



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 04:45 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

Pollution in the form of pesticides, herbicides, inorganic fertilizers, stuff raining down out of the skies, in the water, the top soil, all add to the 'nutrients' taken up by plants and added to its 'produce'. Then they do a ton other stuff to it before it gets to our pallet.



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 06:25 PM
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Great something else that is hugely beneficial to people. What will those evil scientists who go to work every day looking for ways to kill us all come up with next?

The responses in this thread are the prime example of people who do not care to understand what they are criticizing.



posted on Oct, 2 2016 @ 07:54 PM
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originally posted by: FocusedWolf

originally posted by: yuppa
hey imagine if this could be used to nanocoat fat cells so they dont absorb fat?


Or nanocoat intestines so you can't digest food. Win win.


No you need protein to live so thats not a win win for you.



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