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How important is talent in music?

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posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: luthier

Sorry, luthier. Are you complaining that people like bad music? Or that talent doesn't get recognized? Or that the record companies are controlling our brains? What, them too as well as HAARP, the CIA, ad agencies and think-tanks?

It must get a bit crowded and jostly round the control panel inside our heads, don't you think? Everybody stabbing at the old buttons and shoving the other guys' hands away. Or maybe they're polite about it and take turns.

Sorry old fellow, I don't really get your point. But bang away all you want if it makes you feel better.




posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 01:31 PM
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a reply to: Astyanax

Apparently you know next to nothing about the production of music, the reality and history of musicsl competition, what talent is, or pschoacoustic effects.

I said nothing about mind control. I said they studied what peoples brains react to as pleasent regardless of technique. Just toneality. getthatprosound.com...
blog.udemy.com...




My point dear is you act like an expert but its obvious to me your not. You havent thought about these things deeply and make falacious claims.

Yeah "talent" is important for classical music. Much less so in pop, folk, or any other musical form that has a different purpose than music with strong theoretical backrounds.


I dont judge comic books with with Hemmingway.




edit on 29-8-2016 by luthier because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 09:16 PM
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a reply to: luthier


Apparently you know next to nothing about the production of music, the reality and history of musicsl competition, what talent is, or pschoacoustic effects.

Yes, of course, that must be it.

How foolish of me to think I could debate an expert like you.

By the way, what works of classical music do you like the best? Have you heard anything by Fletcher or Munson?


edit on 29/8/16 by Astyanax because: of psychoacoustics.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 10:13 PM
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a reply to: Astyanax

Well I was a student of Terry Riley's so I prefer minamalism so Reich, Glass, Mathieu, and John Cage are pretty high on my list.

Goreki's third is one of my favorite pieces.

If we are talking guitar players then I prefer Williams and was also a student of Dusan Bagdonovic for a short time. Fantastic counterpoint teacher.

But yeah composers are my jam. Love American composers of the early twentieth like Ives as well for its bizarre band music quality. Also love bartok.



edit on 29-8-2016 by luthier because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 11:18 PM
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a reply to: luthier

Fletcher & Munson

Mr Expert in Psychoacoustics. Pah.

What addlepated egotism.


edit on 29/8/16 by Astyanax because: of another thing.



posted on Aug, 29 2016 @ 11:45 PM
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originally posted by: Astyanax
a reply to: luthier

Fletcher & Munson

Mr Expert in Psychoacoustics. Pah.

What addlepated egotism.



Peter fletcher and munson summers are classical guitarists though i would assume you had no idea.

Nice try at a gotcha question. I just didnt assume you were being dishonest.

But yeah my first link on the subject explains it well.

5. Equal Loudness Part II: Fletcher-Munson Strikes Back

Of course the inverse of the closer/louder affect of the ears non-linear response is also true, and equally useful for mix purposes: to make things appear further away, instead of boosting you roll off the extreme highs and lows. This will create a sense of front-to-back depth in a mix, pushing certain supporting instruments into the imaginary distance and keeping the foreground clear for the lead elements.

And p.s. its glaringly obvious when you have to try tomfoolery to win an arguement rather than support an arguement or attack falacy. Furthermore the strawman/red herring is just ill played. I never claimed to be an expert in psychoacoustics which is a specialized field of pyschology and neuroscience mixed with acoustics. I do have an understanding of using high anf low pass filters for creating presence in layered instrumentation.

By the way have you shown any understanding or vocabularly of music in this discussion....nope. Just googled type and paste.

If anyone is showing arrogance its the person who cant speak casually without plagerizing google about music.
edit on 30-8-2016 by luthier because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 02:16 AM
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a reply to: luthier

Nice try. I asked about works, not players. And you replied in the same vein.


I prefer minamalism so Reich, Glass, Mathieu, and John Cage are pretty high on my list. Goreki's third is one of my favorite pieces...yeah composers are my jam.

Heh heh.


edit on 30/8/16 by Astyanax because: of some idiot’s italics



posted on Aug, 30 2016 @ 07:05 AM
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a reply to: Astyanax

Uh huh. Which was your dishonesty. Which is why i made the distinction.

Its the 5th topic of the link and a common practice in music production.

You already exhibitted that you had no belief in psychoacoustics, why would assume you were talking about the subject?

Also the only purpose of your question being to trick an answer is called what in debate? Oh well have a good one. Next time i can assume its futile trying to get you to debate, defend your own arguements, or attack my argument's.



posted on Aug, 31 2016 @ 01:27 AM
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a reply to: luthier

Actually, you still don’t understand it and your link doesn’t explain it.

The Fletcher-Munson curves illustrate the frequency response of the human ear at different sound pressure levels. They are, obviously, averages; the actual response will vary from person to person.

The F-M curves explain why bass and high treble sounds are fainter to our ears than ‘midrange’ sounds, to which our ears are more responsive and which are, not coincidentally, the frequencies mainly used by human speech.

In the old days, when hi-fi amplifiers had lots of tone controls, a Loudness switch was a common sight on the front panel. When you pressed it, it progressively increased the bass and treble settings as you lowered the volume on the amp. Nowadays, because hi-fi has become highly consumerized, most amps lack a loudness switch but the amp circuitry is sometimes jiggered to boost high and low frequencies at low volume anyway.

*


See here, luthier. I have some positive feelings for you. I know you genuinely love music, and that you really mean no harm. But — seriously — you don’t know quite as much as you think you do. Sometimes you say things that are false or wrong, and those who know better may feel impelled to correct you. Don’t take every attempt to set you right as a personal attack.

You may believe it or not as you please, but I actually have some academic mileage in acoustics and psychoacoustics, in addition to having been a musician and music obsessive for thirty years. I know my way around an experimental audio lab as well as a recording studio and a stage. And — whether you think so or not — I never make any statement that I cannot substantiate. I don’t google or cut and paste except to provide a citable source. I don’t need to; as you can see, I am perfectly capable of writing my own explanations and descriptions.

Stop thinking of every disagreement with what you say as a personal attack on you. It isn’t. Discuss things civilly, instead of getting your back up every time someone contradicts you, and you won’t be shamed by people laying traps for your ignorance.




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