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UK: Theresa May forms new cabinet

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posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 03:17 AM
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a reply to: ScepticScot
Can't say I disagree with you there. I may have underestimated her a little.




posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 03:27 AM
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originally posted by: syrinx high priest

originally posted by: crazyewok

PM resigned.

As we only had a election last may (should be every 5 years) and we just left the EU so someone needs to step up quick the conservative party MPs nominated May.

In 4 years time we will have another general election.

Queen had no roles or choice in the matter,


what is a MP ?

sorry, I really just don't know


UK divided into 650 constituency and each one has a MP (member of parliament ).

Anyone can stand for the position of MP provided they are a UK citizen. And they are voted every 5 years in a general election.

They make up the house of commons that proprose new laws and make the major descions.



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 04:28 AM
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I like to get the "as others see us" viewpoint, and I notice that CNN is confidently labelling her the "76th" Prime Minister.
I know Americans like to number their Presidents and Congresses, but I'm not sure how CNN can arrive at any kind of firm number for "Prime Ministers of the UK".
In the first place, there is the problem of those who get kicked out and come back later, like Gladstone, Wilson, and even Churchill. Are they to be counted once or twice?
Then there is the problem of definition. Traditionally Walpole has been counted as the first, but the office was really evolving into existence before his time. Convention came to identify the title with the official post of First Lord of the Treasury, but Lord Salisbury preferred to do the job in conjunction with being Foreign Secretary.
This penchant for specific numbers doesn't quite work under our less defined system.



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 06:17 AM
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Hey, I wonder how Michael Gove is feeling...

Poor guy.



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 06:20 AM
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originally posted by: midicon

Hey, I wonder how Michael Gove is feeling...

Poor guy.





# him.

Slimly little bastard.



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 06:45 AM
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a reply to: crazyewok

He saved us from a Boris Johnson government , Michael Gove deserves a medal.



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 09:57 AM
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originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: crazyewok

He saved us from a Boris Johnson government , Michael Gove deserves a medal.

Just before he is hanged.
Gove is a lying back stabbing little sh!t.
So glad he was fired.
edit on 14/7/2016 by UKTruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 10:08 AM
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a reply to: UKTruth

Didn't Johnson stab his friend Cameron in the back?
What's sauce for the goose.


edit on 14-7-2016 by gortex because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 10:14 AM
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originally posted by: crazyewok

originally posted by: midicon

Hey, I wonder how Michael Gove is feeling...

Poor guy.





# him.

Slimly little bastard.



Hey, I was being sarcastic... He's like a horrible little thunderbird's puppet.



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 10:31 AM
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originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: UKTruth

Didn't Johnson back stab his friend Cameron ?
What's source for the goose.


Disagreeing on policy is not back stabbing. It's very admirable to stand up for what you believe in despite what your mate in power wants. Shame more politicians are not the same.

What Gove did is altogether different and hopefully he will now fade away. His political career is in tatters and it's good to see a slimy liar get what is coming to them. Same with Osborne.



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 10:34 AM
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a reply to: UKTruth

It wasn't a disagreement on policy though , Johnson is a chancer , he used the referendum in an attempt to unseat Cameron and walk into Downing Street , Gove prevented that.



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 12:13 PM
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originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: UKTruth

It wasn't a disagreement on policy though , Johnson is a chancer , he used the referendum in an attempt to unseat Cameron and walk into Downing Street , Gove prevented that.



Or maybe he just had a different view on the EU? Sounds like you are creating a narrative to fit your predisposed opinion.
Gove campaigned on the same views, then immediately after the vote stabbed Johnson in the back.

It matters not anyway - the scum of Cameron, Gove and Osborne are gone. We have some relatively normal people like Johnson and Leadsome to take charge now and steer us away from the EU



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 12:31 PM
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So who is her Deputy???
Rainbows
Jane



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 12:36 PM
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a reply to: angelchemuel

As far as I'm aware there isn't one , but Cameron didn't have one either after the coalition.



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Ah well. May be John Prescott put paid to that office. Anyway it's the Chancellor that would take over 'pro-temps' if anything would happen to incapacitate the PM.

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 03:36 PM
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originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: UKTruth

It wasn't a disagreement on policy though , Johnson is a chancer , he used the referendum in an attempt to unseat Cameron and walk into Downing Street , Gove prevented that.


Yes it WAS a disagreement over policy. Johnson - like MANY in the Conservative Party - wanted the UK to leave the EU. Cameron wanted it to stay in the EU. Your vacuous suspicion that Johson was insincere and merely used the argument within the Conservative Party to try to become Prime Minister has no evidence to support it. Yes - Johnson DID exploit the disagreement over the policy towards the EU. However, there is no reason to believe that his scepticism of the EU was not genuine.



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 04:56 PM
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originally posted by: angelchemuel
a reply to: gortex

Ah well. May be John Prescott put paid to that office. Anyway it's the Chancellor that would take over 'pro-temps' if anything would happen to incapacitate the PM.

Rainbows
Jane


The line of succession for the UK PM is all a bit vague. I don't think the Chancellor is automatically the no. 2.

I suppose that's because the Queen is the commander in chief of the armed forces rather than the PM. And there's unlikely to be a scenario where it's time critical to have an immediate successor to the PM ready and waiting ... the country could tick on by while the political parties went through the motions to elect a new leader.

The only precedent I can think of is when the Australian PM Harold Holt drowned. The Governor General, acting for the Queen, appointed a caretaker PM (his deputy) until the parties forming his coalition government eventually decided who would formally take over.

There's "another" UK Minister lurking in the shadows with the power to authorise the use of nuclear weapons in the event of the PM's death in wartime.
Reassuring I know, you'll sleep easier knowing that.



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 05:18 PM
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originally posted by: TheShippingForecast
The line of succession for the UK PM is all a bit vague. I don't think the Chancellor is automatically the no. 2.

I think the question has been left in the air because the issue has never come up in the democratic age.
The last P.M.to die in office was Palmerston. Queen Victoria sent for Lord Russell, who was Foreign Secretary at the time, but the obvious choice because he had been P.M. more than once before.

There may be a historic case for treating Secretary of State as the next most senior post. I believe the Americans have formalised this (when Nixon resigned, he did it by writing a letter to Kissinger).
edit on 14-7-2016 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2016 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: PaddyInf
a reply to: syrinx high priest

In the UK we have what is referred to as a parliamentary democracy. During elections we don't vote for an individual person, we vote for a party. The leader of that party becomes PM.

The leader of the party is chosen by its members according to predetermined party rules. As David Cameron stepped down as leader of the Conservatives a new leader is chosen from within its ranks. As the Conservatives won the last election that person automatically becomes PM.


thanks !




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