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They is spraying us!!!!!

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posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 09:38 AM
link   

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: InTheLight

www.giss.nasa.gov...

www.nature.com...

There are quite a few studies on contrails, both from the content aspect to the effect they may have on climate.
But you won't find them on geoengineeringwatch.com.


I am looking for new scientific studies specifically related to contrail chemistry, not so much on the observation side or older studies from the 1990s.


You might find what you're looking for here

www.nasa.gov...


Yes, searching aviation biofuel does offer more information, but I came across this paper which not only studies biofuel but different aircraft engines and contrail formations (or lack thereof) but addresses more the chemical process I am looking for (at 4.1). However, they do not breakdown what exactly this 'soot' is comprised of and if we can then perhaps describe contrails as chemtrails.




A contrail will form if the mixing trajectory is tangential to the water vapour saturation curve or crosses it, i.e. trespasses into the water supersaturated regime. Then tiny droplets form by condensation (with the aid of mainly emitted soot particles that serve as condensation nuclei or abundant ambient particles) and they freeze quickly at temperatures below the supercooling limit of water, around −38 °C.


www.researchgate.net...


Why stop there? Clouds contain particles such as soot AND water is a chemical!


I am not stopping anywhere, I am keeping to the thread's subject.




posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 09:50 AM
link   

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: InTheLight

www.giss.nasa.gov...

www.nature.com...

There are quite a few studies on contrails, both from the content aspect to the effect they may have on climate.
But you won't find them on geoengineeringwatch.com.


I am looking for new scientific studies specifically related to contrail chemistry, not so much on the observation side or older studies from the 1990s.


You might find what you're looking for here

www.nasa.gov...


Yes, searching aviation biofuel does offer more information, but I came across this paper which not only studies biofuel but different aircraft engines and contrail formations (or lack thereof) but addresses more the chemical process I am looking for (at 4.1). However, they do not breakdown what exactly this 'soot' is comprised of and if we can then perhaps describe contrails as chemtrails.




A contrail will form if the mixing trajectory is tangential to the water vapour saturation curve or crosses it, i.e. trespasses into the water supersaturated regime. Then tiny droplets form by condensation (with the aid of mainly emitted soot particles that serve as condensation nuclei or abundant ambient particles) and they freeze quickly at temperatures below the supercooling limit of water, around −38 °C.


www.researchgate.net...


Why stop there? Clouds contain particles such as soot AND water is a chemical!


I am not stopping anywhere, I am keeping to the thread's subject.


Are you going to start calling clouds chemclouds?



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 09:51 AM
link   

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: InTheLight

www.giss.nasa.gov...

www.nature.com...

There are quite a few studies on contrails, both from the content aspect to the effect they may have on climate.
But you won't find them on geoengineeringwatch.com.


I am looking for new scientific studies specifically related to contrail chemistry, not so much on the observation side or older studies from the 1990s.


You might find what you're looking for here

www.nasa.gov...


Yes, searching aviation biofuel does offer more information, but I came across this paper which not only studies biofuel but different aircraft engines and contrail formations (or lack thereof) but addresses more the chemical process I am looking for (at 4.1). However, they do not breakdown what exactly this 'soot' is comprised of and if we can then perhaps describe contrails as chemtrails.




A contrail will form if the mixing trajectory is tangential to the water vapour saturation curve or crosses it, i.e. trespasses into the water supersaturated regime. Then tiny droplets form by condensation (with the aid of mainly emitted soot particles that serve as condensation nuclei or abundant ambient particles) and they freeze quickly at temperatures below the supercooling limit of water, around −38 °C.


www.researchgate.net...


Why stop there? Clouds contain particles such as soot AND water is a chemical!


I am not stopping anywhere, I am keeping to the thread's subject.


Are you going to start calling clouds chemclouds?


Would it be relevant? Perhaps it is to a certain extent.



"We found that nature produces particles without pollution," Jasper Kirkby, European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) particle physicist and originator and spokesperson of the CLOUD experiment, told Business Insider. "That is going to require a rethink of how human activities have increased aerosols in clouds."


www.sciencealert.com...

Another reason to plant a tree.
edit on 13CDT10America/Chicago010101031 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 10:19 AM
link   

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: InTheLight

www.giss.nasa.gov...

www.nature.com...

There are quite a few studies on contrails, both from the content aspect to the effect they may have on climate.
But you won't find them on geoengineeringwatch.com.


I am looking for new scientific studies specifically related to contrail chemistry, not so much on the observation side or older studies from the 1990s.


You might find what you're looking for here

www.nasa.gov...


Yes, searching aviation biofuel does offer more information, but I came across this paper which not only studies biofuel but different aircraft engines and contrail formations (or lack thereof) but addresses more the chemical process I am looking for (at 4.1). However, they do not breakdown what exactly this 'soot' is comprised of and if we can then perhaps describe contrails as chemtrails.




A contrail will form if the mixing trajectory is tangential to the water vapour saturation curve or crosses it, i.e. trespasses into the water supersaturated regime. Then tiny droplets form by condensation (with the aid of mainly emitted soot particles that serve as condensation nuclei or abundant ambient particles) and they freeze quickly at temperatures below the supercooling limit of water, around −38 °C.


www.researchgate.net...


Why stop there? Clouds contain particles such as soot AND water is a chemical!


I am not stopping anywhere, I am keeping to the thread's subject.


Are you going to start calling clouds chemclouds?


Would it be relevant? Perhaps it is to a certain extent.



It's very relevant if you're going to start calling contrails chemtrails just because they may contain traces of chemicals



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 10:20 AM
link   

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: InTheLight

www.giss.nasa.gov...

www.nature.com...

There are quite a few studies on contrails, both from the content aspect to the effect they may have on climate.
But you won't find them on geoengineeringwatch.com.


I am looking for new scientific studies specifically related to contrail chemistry, not so much on the observation side or older studies from the 1990s.


You might find what you're looking for here

www.nasa.gov...


Yes, searching aviation biofuel does offer more information, but I came across this paper which not only studies biofuel but different aircraft engines and contrail formations (or lack thereof) but addresses more the chemical process I am looking for (at 4.1). However, they do not breakdown what exactly this 'soot' is comprised of and if we can then perhaps describe contrails as chemtrails.




A contrail will form if the mixing trajectory is tangential to the water vapour saturation curve or crosses it, i.e. trespasses into the water supersaturated regime. Then tiny droplets form by condensation (with the aid of mainly emitted soot particles that serve as condensation nuclei or abundant ambient particles) and they freeze quickly at temperatures below the supercooling limit of water, around −38 °C.


www.researchgate.net...


Why stop there? Clouds contain particles such as soot AND water is a chemical!


I am not stopping anywhere, I am keeping to the thread's subject.


Are you going to start calling clouds chemclouds?


Would it be relevant? Perhaps it is to a certain extent.



It's very relevant if you're going to start calling contrails chemtrails just because they may contain traces of chemicals


If they contain chemicals does that not make it relevant to you?



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 10:53 AM
link   

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: InTheLight

www.giss.nasa.gov...

www.nature.com...

There are quite a few studies on contrails, both from the content aspect to the effect they may have on climate.
But you won't find them on geoengineeringwatch.com.


I am looking for new scientific studies specifically related to contrail chemistry, not so much on the observation side or older studies from the 1990s.


You might find what you're looking for here

www.nasa.gov...


Yes, searching aviation biofuel does offer more information, but I came across this paper which not only studies biofuel but different aircraft engines and contrail formations (or lack thereof) but addresses more the chemical process I am looking for (at 4.1). However, they do not breakdown what exactly this 'soot' is comprised of and if we can then perhaps describe contrails as chemtrails.




A contrail will form if the mixing trajectory is tangential to the water vapour saturation curve or crosses it, i.e. trespasses into the water supersaturated regime. Then tiny droplets form by condensation (with the aid of mainly emitted soot particles that serve as condensation nuclei or abundant ambient particles) and they freeze quickly at temperatures below the supercooling limit of water, around −38 °C.


www.researchgate.net...


Why stop there? Clouds contain particles such as soot AND water is a chemical!


I am not stopping anywhere, I am keeping to the thread's subject.


Are you going to start calling clouds chemclouds?


Would it be relevant? Perhaps it is to a certain extent.



It's very relevant if you're going to start calling contrails chemtrails just because they may contain traces of chemicals


If they contain chemicals does that not make it relevant to you?


It's not going to make me start calling condensation trails chemtrails



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 10:57 AM
link   

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: InTheLight

www.giss.nasa.gov...

www.nature.com...

There are quite a few studies on contrails, both from the content aspect to the effect they may have on climate.
But you won't find them on geoengineeringwatch.com.


I am looking for new scientific studies specifically related to contrail chemistry, not so much on the observation side or older studies from the 1990s.


You might find what you're looking for here

www.nasa.gov...


Yes, searching aviation biofuel does offer more information, but I came across this paper which not only studies biofuel but different aircraft engines and contrail formations (or lack thereof) but addresses more the chemical process I am looking for (at 4.1). However, they do not breakdown what exactly this 'soot' is comprised of and if we can then perhaps describe contrails as chemtrails.




A contrail will form if the mixing trajectory is tangential to the water vapour saturation curve or crosses it, i.e. trespasses into the water supersaturated regime. Then tiny droplets form by condensation (with the aid of mainly emitted soot particles that serve as condensation nuclei or abundant ambient particles) and they freeze quickly at temperatures below the supercooling limit of water, around −38 °C.


www.researchgate.net...


Why stop there? Clouds contain particles such as soot AND water is a chemical!


I am not stopping anywhere, I am keeping to the thread's subject.


Are you going to start calling clouds chemclouds?


Would it be relevant? Perhaps it is to a certain extent.



It's very relevant if you're going to start calling contrails chemtrails just because they may contain traces of chemicals


If they contain chemicals does that not make it relevant to you?


It's not going to make me start calling condensation trails chemtrails


How about condensation-soot trails?



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 11:22 AM
link   

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: InTheLight

www.giss.nasa.gov...

www.nature.com...

There are quite a few studies on contrails, both from the content aspect to the effect they may have on climate.
But you won't find them on geoengineeringwatch.com.


I am looking for new scientific studies specifically related to contrail chemistry, not so much on the observation side or older studies from the 1990s.


You might find what you're looking for here

www.nasa.gov...


Yes, searching aviation biofuel does offer more information, but I came across this paper which not only studies biofuel but different aircraft engines and contrail formations (or lack thereof) but addresses more the chemical process I am looking for (at 4.1). However, they do not breakdown what exactly this 'soot' is comprised of and if we can then perhaps describe contrails as chemtrails.




A contrail will form if the mixing trajectory is tangential to the water vapour saturation curve or crosses it, i.e. trespasses into the water supersaturated regime. Then tiny droplets form by condensation (with the aid of mainly emitted soot particles that serve as condensation nuclei or abundant ambient particles) and they freeze quickly at temperatures below the supercooling limit of water, around −38 °C.


www.researchgate.net...


Why stop there? Clouds contain particles such as soot AND water is a chemical!


I am not stopping anywhere, I am keeping to the thread's subject.


Are you going to start calling clouds chemclouds?


Would it be relevant? Perhaps it is to a certain extent.



It's very relevant if you're going to start calling contrails chemtrails just because they may contain traces of chemicals


If they contain chemicals does that not make it relevant to you?


It's not going to make me start calling condensation trails chemtrails


How about condensation-soot trails?


Why?



posted on Mar, 16 2017 @ 11:28 AM
link   

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: mrthumpy

originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: network dude
a reply to: InTheLight

www.giss.nasa.gov...

www.nature.com...

There are quite a few studies on contrails, both from the content aspect to the effect they may have on climate.
But you won't find them on geoengineeringwatch.com.


I am looking for new scientific studies specifically related to contrail chemistry, not so much on the observation side or older studies from the 1990s.


You might find what you're looking for here

www.nasa.gov...


Yes, searching aviation biofuel does offer more information, but I came across this paper which not only studies biofuel but different aircraft engines and contrail formations (or lack thereof) but addresses more the chemical process I am looking for (at 4.1). However, they do not breakdown what exactly this 'soot' is comprised of and if we can then perhaps describe contrails as chemtrails.




A contrail will form if the mixing trajectory is tangential to the water vapour saturation curve or crosses it, i.e. trespasses into the water supersaturated regime. Then tiny droplets form by condensation (with the aid of mainly emitted soot particles that serve as condensation nuclei or abundant ambient particles) and they freeze quickly at temperatures below the supercooling limit of water, around −38 °C.


www.researchgate.net...


Why stop there? Clouds contain particles such as soot AND water is a chemical!


I am not stopping anywhere, I am keeping to the thread's subject.


Are you going to start calling clouds chemclouds?


Would it be relevant? Perhaps it is to a certain extent.



It's very relevant if you're going to start calling contrails chemtrails just because they may contain traces of chemicals


If they contain chemicals does that not make it relevant to you?


It's not going to make me start calling condensation trails chemtrails


How about condensation-soot trails?


Why?


Because it is relevant...



Then tiny droplets form by condensation (with the aid of mainly emitted soot particles that serve as condensation nuclei or abundant ambient particles)



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