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posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko

originally posted by: Kali74
a reply to: nonspecific




am a 39 year old man and am about 5 foot ten and a half and have just weighed myself and came in at 8 stone 11 fully clothed, that cannot be good.


Greek yogurt, eggs, fish, chicken, spinach, broccoli and for snacks eat fruit. You'll be feeling and looking better in no time.



Aye-yi-yi, go easy on the man!

Depending on what his diet was before, such a radical change might be disastrous in terms of taste.

Now all those things are, of course, wonderful, but you do have to retrain your palate. If it's used to a high fat, high suger, high sodium diet, those things will start out tasting like sand and you could turn yourself off the idea of eating healthy permanently.

Incremental is best. Introduce the new things either as ingredients with familiar flavors, toning the unhealthiness down or as one or two new items a month giving yourself time to get used to and appreciate them.

It took me years to train my husband, but it was well worth it.


My diet will indeed take some time to rebuild, by the end of it I was maybe eating a sandwich every couple of days and as I said earlier I weighed myself earlier and only weigh 8 stone 10 and have a bmi of 17.1 which puts me in the danger zone and according to the NHS suffering from mild malnutrition.

Even the concept of eating seems a little alien right now and as a trained chef that is a little odd thinking about it.

I think in maybe a month or 2 I should be back up to a reasonable weight and can start eating some proper healthy foods again and learn to enjoy it again.




posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 02:05 PM
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I'm not advocating it but depending on your state cannabis might help you get through the appetite woes.

Good on you for making the decision to quit. My father passed away in 09 from alcoholism, and I can tell you that it was not a good death. Horrible things happen when liver and kidneys call it quits simultaneously.
Don't be too hard on yourself, and seek medical intervention if you think it's necessary. Alcohol is one of the few drugs that can have potentially fatal withdrawals. Seizure threshold drops dramatically.

Keep it up ! best wishes



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 02:09 PM
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Good on you. Stay strong. Plan for temptation and get help when you need it.

You are made new with every breath.

Cheering you on!!!

AB



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 02:12 PM
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Twelve step program is how I stopped and continue to stay stopped, it saved my life but even better it saved my sanity. Started drinking at 15yrs and stopped at 42yrs, my worst days now are a million times better than my best days when I was drinking. I'm 18yrs in now, Not into any religion myself.

Stay positive.

JML
a reply to: nonspecific



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 02:13 PM
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originally posted by: SpongeBeard
I'm not advocating it but depending on your state cannabis might help you get through the appetite woes.

Good on you for making the decision to quit. My father passed away in 09 from alcoholism, and I can tell you that it was not a good death. Horrible things happen when liver and kidneys call it quits simultaneously.
Don't be too hard on yourself, and seek medical intervention if you think it's necessary. Alcohol is one of the few drugs that can have potentially fatal withdrawals. Seizure threshold drops dramatically.

Keep it up ! best wishes


I am not a big fan of cannabis, I used it years ago but as it shifted towards the more THC varieties and away from the cannabinoids it tended to worsen my mental issues and paranoia.

My other issue with it is that I could end up swapping one addiction for another as I have quite an addictive personality.

I hope I have caught it in time as I have also seen what happens when alcohol kills and understand how traumatising it must have been for you.



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 02:16 PM
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originally posted by: JustMeLiverpool
Twelve step program is how I stopped and continue to stay stopped, it saved my life but even better it saved my sanity. Started drinking at 15yrs and stopped at 42yrs, my worst days now are a million times better than my best days when I was drinking. I'm 18yrs in now, Not into any religion myself.

Stay positive.

JML
a reply to: nonspecific



That is good news and gives me hope as it sounds like you were on the booze as long as I have been and 18 years and counting sounds like a plan I could work with.

Also good to see you did not need to turn to religion as well



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 02:41 PM
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Give it a go there's nothing to lose, a very wise man said to me
"if it's not for you feel free to go out and pick your misery back up anytime you feel like".
Never want to be like that ever again.
Everyone's in your corner.

JML

a reply to: nonspecific




posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 02:46 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific
That is fantastic to hear. That took a lot of courage to write it all down for others to read.

It's good that you have caught this before irreversible damage to your liver has been done, it can heal.

This is not just a sober nonspecific, it is one we can expect to have around a lot longer.

Thank you for sharing this, and as you know, you have many, many people here to reply on if you need,





posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 03:01 PM
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I remember your first thread brother and it changed my life.

I also recall the motivational posts you made when I was kicking the booze. I wish I could do the same for you.

It's not going to be easy but you've got the right mind/thinking patterns to do it.

Stay strong, if you waiver or struggle think of Mrs NS. If you need any advice further from this you're in the right place.

I really like you man and want you to be happy. We take so much for granted in this world often it's too late before we realise that. You've flicked the switch with plenty of time.

If you're stuck for things to fill up the time I'm renovating a house so I'm always here to talk DIY.

It maybe sounds a bit phoney because we've never met but I mean it NS, I know what you're going through and I'm here if you need anything.



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 03:07 PM
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originally posted by: and14263
I remember your first thread brother and it changed my life.

I also recall the motivational posts you made when I was kicking the booze. I wish I could do the same for you.

It's not going to be easy but you've got the right mind/thinking patterns to do it.

Stay strong, if you waiver or struggle think of Mrs NS. If you need any advice further from this you're in the right place.

I really like you man and want you to be happy. We take so much for granted in this world often it's too late before we realise that. You've flicked the switch with plenty of time.

If you're stuck for things to fill up the time I'm renovating a house so I'm always here to talk DIY.

It maybe sounds a bit phoney because we've never met but I mean it NS, I know what you're going through and I'm here if you need anything.



thanks for that mate, I remember our conversations was at first thinking about sending you a PM but it felt a little imposing and decided to put it right out in the open instead.

It's a long time in the making but I am fully determined to make it happen, Even feeling like I do right now is better than feeling like I did and knowing that every beer is not just killing you but those around you.




posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 03:07 PM
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originally posted by: nonspecific
Also good to see you did not need to turn to religion as well

A big part of successful recovery is the acknowledgement of the YUGE role that ego plays in alcoholism. Spirituality re-orients a person to the fact that the world is much, much bigger and more important than little ol' you.

To pass the time and give your mind something to focus on besides withdrawal and recovery, try volunteering at a soup kitchen (if they have those over there) or something like that a couple nights a week. Be of service to others and forget yourself.

It works. Please don't reject spiritual concepts just because they're spiritual concepts. If it works, it works. And that's all that matters, because failure is not an option.




posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 03:39 PM
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originally posted by: NthOther

originally posted by: nonspecific
Also good to see you did not need to turn to religion as well

A big part of successful recovery is the acknowledgement of the YUGE role that ego plays in alcoholism. Spirituality re-orients a person to the fact that the world is much, much bigger and more important than little ol' you.

To pass the time and give your mind something to focus on besides withdrawal and recovery, try volunteering at a soup kitchen (if they have those over there) or something like that a couple nights a week. Be of service to others and forget yourself.

It works. Please don't reject spiritual concepts just because they're spiritual concepts. If it works, it works. And that's all that matters, because failure is not an option.



That comment may have come across a little harsh and it was not intended that way.

I meant to say that I think the best way to deal with an addiction is from within yourself and not with an exterior crutch, Religion and spirituality should be seperate from your own achievement and ability in my opinion.




posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 06:20 PM
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originally posted by: nonspecific

I kind of feel a little stupid and wish that if only one of those conversations had involved me then things would not be quite so bad but we are all at the end of the day responsible for our own actions ultimately.

Of course we are, but don't put yourself down in a singular way, you have good qualities. A simple general enquiry from me, and you responded, and I thank you for that, worth a thousand posts here....no much more really, all I can give back, is I really wish you well.



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 06:41 PM
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a reply to: smurfy

I've been thinking about responding to that comment by nonspecific but it's hard to find the right way to put it.

Anyway - nonspecific - it can be extremely difficult broaching the subject with someone who has a drinking problem and the timing of it can be crucial.

For one thing, it's no good trying when they're under the influence. Just try saying 'you're drunk again' well, they already know that


The following morning they're likely to be hungover so not too receptive to any attempt at a reasonable discussion.

Even when sober they are likely to be defensive and will possibly deny that there is a problem and if you go about it the wrong way, then your sunk.

Any further attempt might be met with 'don't start that again' or something similar in an attempt to put the subject off-limits. After that, it just seems like nagging or beating your head against the wall.

Your friends probably agonised about the decision to confront you or even discuss it with each other. Bless them, they found the right time and the right approach.

Well done to you for listening, but don't feel bad or stupid that they felt they should discuss it amongst themselves first.



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 09:04 PM
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Congrats on a great decision, and well done. I see you're already getting tons of good advice, so I won't add any. 'Just wanted to say that we're with you and what you're doing & going through is 100% worth it. And now, your life begins...



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 10:22 PM
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a reply to: berenike
You've summed it up beautifully. I've been involved in those "Come to Jesus" type of confrontations and they are never pretty. However if you do truly love someone you'll find the courage to do what it takes to make them see that you're really worried that they won't be around much longer.
Of the three people I loved enough to be a part of an intervention, one is dead, one is dying and one is straight for the past six years.
A dear friend of mine who spent 30 years "in the bottle" (his phrase) once told me that the hardest part of quitting was learning to like himself when sober.



posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 05:08 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific

Ive been in a similar situation although not 20 years, more like 15.
But still, ive been there, and i know just how much emotions and the anxiety can kick ones ass..
expect to feel like sh** for a few weeks, but then...
and if youre not too old of a person, memory, concentration, cognitive function and motor control will recover fully!
unless of course you suffered from extreme B1 deficiency - although reading your text that seems to not be the case.
lucky!!
that is extremely dangerous as you already know.

how are your legs feeling?
are they tingling? feet? hands? how are they?

if that is fine, then expect to fully recover!


i got your back and im very proud of you. myself, i stopped drinking due to the fact that my feet, legs, hands and arms started to tingle every night when i went to bed.
that scared the living crap out of me - cause i knew that if i didnt stop - that would be permanent.
so that was enough of a scare for me...

ive been clean now for about 9 months - although i still have a beer now and then - although its downgraded from 7/day to 1-2/week.
i dont believe in "alcoholism" being there for the rest of ones life, and i dont believe in AA, and i dont believe in calling oneself an alcoholic.
thats a label thats hard to shake.
and it is completely unnecessary.

yes, i was addicted and i abused alcohol, but then i stopped.
so why label myself anything im not anymore! that just adds to it.
and since im back to normal now, can have a drink with friends without drinking myself retarded and waking up feeling like sh** - why label myself an alcoholic? just unnecessary and hurts self esteem rather than build it.

my point is there could very well be a very bright future ahead of you, as long as youve decided and you can look yourself in the mirror and go "im no longer an alcoholic" and believing that, through and through.
if that is true - then i offer you my sincere congratulations!

keep us posted on your progress, and if you wanna PM to talk and discuss the horrors of delirium; the panicattacks, the fear, the anxiety, the uncontrollable emotions - or - talk about the future and the prospects and motivations and energy that lies ahead - whatevs!

peace bro! and good luck

ps. STAY AWAY FROM BENZOS!!! youve gotten past the acute-phase, so DO NOT take them. not worth the risk. and you have an increased risk for addiction now. always remember that. ds.



posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 05:14 AM
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a reply to: Dem0nc1eaner

as long as youre not noticing any side effects such as memory troubles, tingling in extremities, and you have a healthy diet with lots of vitamins, and you do not drink yourself drunk, just a little tipsy - then i would say youre fine.
its not healthy, no, but neither is soda, chips, candy and what have you.

people tend to overreact a little, and life is short anyway...
if you dont have serious problems accompanying your drinking - like the things i mentioned or even being drunk at work and stuff like this - embarrassing yourself to friends and family - etc.. then i would say youre fine.
just be cautious of the sideffects like i mentioned and keep a healthy diet.

(the diet is the most important thing in the world for an alcohol user as yourself - cause alcohol depletes sources of B1 vitamin, which is crucial to brain function - AND inhibits the bodies natural absorption of this very vitamin. so a b1 deficiency is GUARANTEED unless you supplement it HEAVILY. id say you need about 5000% the RDI of this vitamin. google it for more information. its called thiamine.)
C, b12, and all the other vitamins are also important but you get those with a normal healthy diet, lots of veggies



posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 05:30 AM
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originally posted by: alienDNA
a reply to: Dem0nc1eaner

as long as youre not noticing any side effects such as memory troubles, tingling in extremities, and you have a healthy diet with lots of vitamins, and you do not drink yourself drunk, just a little tipsy - then i would say youre fine.
its not healthy, no, but neither is soda, chips, candy and what have you.

people tend to overreact a little, and life is short anyway...
if you dont have serious problems accompanying your drinking - like the things i mentioned or even being drunk at work and stuff like this - embarrassing yourself to friends and family - etc.. then i would say youre fine.
just be cautious of the sideffects like i mentioned and keep a healthy diet.

(the diet is the most important thing in the world for an alcohol user as yourself - cause alcohol depletes sources of B1 vitamin, which is crucial to brain function - AND inhibits the bodies natural absorption of this very vitamin. so a b1 deficiency is GUARANTEED unless you supplement it HEAVILY. id say you need about 5000% the RDI of this vitamin. google it for more information. its called thiamine.)
C, b12, and all the other vitamins are also important but you get those with a normal healthy diet, lots of veggies



After the first 48 hours of agony I felt a little better.

I have a lot of other very serious things going on right now which is not helping but I do find myself having palpitations and feel very light headed and do feel some seperation from my body especially my hands.

I have around 6 more hours on my own and I can tell you that it seems like a very long time right now.



posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 05:44 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific

How's your workshop coming along?

Do you still have that box of screws and gewgaws that needs sorting out?



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