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The Truth About Alcoholism (Infographic)

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posted on May, 11 2016 @ 11:43 AM
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a reply to: BO XIAN

Thank you for posting this.

This is a lot of why I don't drink.

I see it as one of our societies' biggest problems.




posted on May, 11 2016 @ 12:47 PM
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LIVE FREE AND DIE YOUNG!



posted on May, 11 2016 @ 01:44 PM
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Well, you see, ATS, it’s like this. A herd of buffalo can only move as fast as the slowest buffalo. And when the herd is hunted, it’s the slowest and weakest ones at the back that are killed first. This natural selection is good for the herd as a whole, because the general speed and health of the whole group keeps improving by the regular killing of the weakest members.

In much the same way, the human brain can only operate as fast as the slowest brain cells. Now, as we know, excessive intake of alcohol kills brain cells. But naturally, it attacks the slowest and weakest brain cells first. In this way, regular consumption of beer eliminates the weaker brain cells, making the brain a faster and more efficient machine.

And that, ATS, is why you always feel smarter after a few beers.


(post by hudsonhawk69 removed for a manners violation)

posted on May, 12 2016 @ 12:57 PM
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Hello there,

I joined this site just to comment on the topic of alcoholism and offer my opinion as a recovering alcoholic.

I recently read a quote that said "Drink and drugs are not our problem, reality is our problem; drink and drugs are the solution to this problem." I have to agree with the quote on the basis that I used alcohol to escape. To escape the ceaseless chatter of my imagination demanding to be heard and used. Many people have other reasons to escape reality but in the end the problem that we are trying to escape from becomes second to the problems that are created by our addiction. Our cure is also our cause.

Addicts are selfish by nature and have disregard for the people around them as their addiction is their friend, their confidante and their courage. When I ceased drinking, I was left staring into the chasm that drinking had left in my life. It was at that point I realised how much of my life had been taken from me and also the monumental task I had of rebuilding. Sobriety is a long uphill struggle that nobody can force you to endure until you are ready to except that you are ready to walk it.

I never believed I had a problem; I held down jobs, paid my bills and had relationships but when I was admitted to A & E with an enlarged liver I decided to give sobriety a try. I tried AA, it didn't work for me. So I decided to go it alone and began filling my time with hobbies and activities that I found rewarding.

For the first time in years I have money in the bank. I hear the birds singing in the trees as I walk to work. I have a clarity of vision that is only available through eyes that are no longer awash with alcohol. I have never been happier and I haven't had a drink in 2 years.

I sympathies with addicts of all kinds; Food, drink, drugs, TV, technology. We live in a world where we are made to detest ourselves in order to sell us a cure for our unhappiness. Alcohol is just a very good cure for that unhappiness...until the next day.

Much love,

CovertHippy



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 01:40 PM
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a reply to: mumoffive

You need to take care of yourself and your kids first and foremost.

Usually the people who are closet to the alcoholic will display codependant behavior, and working to correct and overcome this will greatly improve the lives you you, your children and ultimately your children's father.

You can't "make" an alcoholic change. You can't force them to stop their destructive behavior. A lot of the behavior you described sounds to me like he is in denial about how damaging his behavior is to those around him. Right now, he's living in a world that hasn't touched him with serious enough consequences to make him question the his choices/behavior.

He blames you because he refuses to look at himself. If he's projecting onto you, then somewhere deep down inside of him he does know that he is to blame for your leaving.

You aren't responsible for his choices and behavior. You can't "fix" him. You have to worry about yourself and your children and the things in YOUR life that you DO have control and are responsible for.

I don't want to write a novel, so I'll try to cut to the chase:

Lots of people talk about DNA, genetics, bla bla bla -- the fact is, there honestly hasn't been much in the way of credible scientific research to indicate that alcoholism is some kind of inherited or genetic "disease". Even the twin studies that have been conducted weren't all that conclusive.

What IS known from case studies over decades of interviewing and studying alcoholics is one reoccurring theme:

Powerlessness.

At some level, in some way, in the recesses of the alcoholic they feel powerless or not in control of their life of situation in life.

Drinking alcohol is a direct, quick, and easy way for someone to assert control over how they feel (emotionally and physically). It is something THEY can do for themselves. When alcoholics were asked to go back and examine the thoughts and circumstances just before any episode of drinking, we almost always uncover some feeling of "taking back control" or taking back power over a situation of emotional state.

There might be alcoholics in here that'll remember thinking, "I'm going to have some beer, dammit, and you can't stop me!" Or perhaps going to the liquor store angry, and deciding to drink because they're upset/pissed off at someone/something. A "forget this, I'm getting drunk" attitude.

Turning off or tuning out because you don't want to or can't deal with a situation you don't have control over is a common feeling among alcoholics. Many "check out" after a stressful day that they can't figure out how to manage.

The only thing I can say is that the more you work on improving yourself, your life, and the lives of your children -- the more positive effect it tends to have on the alcoholic.

This sounds harsh but it needs to be said: You can't save everyone, not everyone wants to be saved, and not everyone should be saved. It's painful, but sometimes you have to cut your losses and move on. You deserve to be happy and live a life full of joy and abundance. You have the power to make your life and the lives of your children wonderful.

If you are buying into his projection games and feeling guilt, accepting empty apologies and allowing your ex to continue being a negative and destructive influence on you and your kids -- you are essentially condoning and saying his behavior is acceptable as part of your world.

You deserve better. You deserve more. Your children especially deserve more.

Get a protective order if you have to, and steer clear from this man until he's decided he wants to sort his life out and approach you from a place of sobriety. Until you do this, you are essentially rewarding his negative behavior by allowing him to reach you.

If you get word he's making solid, real, and honest progress you might decide at some point to SLOWLY re-introduce yourself (not the kids yet) and offer positive support and reinforcement.

Sorry for the long post ... I've been in a lot of rooms, talked to a lot of people. A few doing great, many missing and some likely now dead.

The long and short? DO YOU. Take control over your life and the lives of your children. Don't allow this guy to drag you down, foul you and their lives along with his.



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 01:45 PM
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originally posted by: Tempter
Nearly 5 months dry. # alcohol.




633 days here.

-5151.7 drinks not consumed
-$12,988 dollars saved
-499,722 calories not consumed

We don't live in the dark ages where water wasn't safe to drink and alcohol in small quantities made things safe. Modern humans gain zero benefit from alcohol, and it's one of the top killers in America.

Best thing I ever did for myself.

Ever.



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 07:55 PM
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If you drink to enjoy yourself there is no problem... unless you a stupid drunk. Drinking as a way for compensating some psychoemotional issues - that's wrong. It depends on where you live too - the US is dependent on automobiles for transportation... not to mention the diets most people have. If you eat healthy and keep your # straight - drink up!! Beer and whiskey have incredible benefits.

www.everydayhealth.com...
www.menshealth.com...
www.livestrong.com...
www.huffingtonpost.com...
www.lifehack.org...
www.foxnews.com...

www.organicfacts.net...
www.livestrong.com...
www.buzzfeed.com...
foodtofitness.com...

Na zdrowie!



posted on May, 12 2016 @ 08:37 PM
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I've been drinking for 7 years, since I was 18. A beer or two turned into six then turned into a twelve then into a bottle of vodka. I'm more of a binge drinker so I'd often go an entire evening of constantly drinking till the sun rises. Like 3 times a week. I've never had issues with hangovers since I'd drink water and have a snack before going to bed. I've never blacked out or vomited because I drank too much. I'm a happy drunk, at worst I'm just annoying because I talk too much or I'm too loud.

I've noticed that I've been using alcohol to self-medicate however. I'm an introvert, bipolar and as of 1 year, been diagnosed with schizophrenia. I've tried dozen of meds and nothing seems to help. I noticed when I got a buzz going I'm more social, active and actually enjoy doing things such as playing video games, doing chores, working out, hanging out, etc. I just feel ... 'normal'? I feel like I can no longer keep this up though because of how bad alcohol is for the body. My greatest fear is becoming psychically dependent on alcohol and having a deadly withdrawal, so I've cut down on the juice while I'm still ahead. I've read that if you can go at least 48 hours after your last drink then you're in the clear when it comes to withdrawals? I've never had the shakes or flu-like symptoms within the first 48 hours after my last drink.

I've cut down to once a week but even I think that's too much. And that's binge drinking because I know I just can't drink like 3 beers and call it quits. I know my body will thank me, I've gain too much weight as of late. I'm going to see a doctor soon and have blood work done to see how my liver is doing and such. I don't know if I should tell my psychiatrist that I haven't been taking my meds and have been drinking instead because I feel that's just going to put me in a bad place. I believe I can just quit on my own, I've even quit cigarettes cold turkey after 5 years of smoking a pack a day.

I'm sure going to miss that buzz and feeling 'normal' once I do finally quit. I just wish there were meds that actually work and not give me nasty side effects or some form of natural alternative that won't eventually kill me. I guess I'll stick to coffee for now until the weekend, which I look forward to because of alcohol, which I know is bad. Oh well ...



posted on May, 20 2016 @ 10:02 PM
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THANKS MYSTIK, FOR A GREAT LONG POST.

Please write such a meaty, helpful, wise long post any time, imho.

THERE'S LOTS of very useful and heavy duty info in your post. Wonderful.

THANKSBIG.



originally posted by: MystikMushroom
a reply to: mumoffive

You need to take care of yourself and your kids first and foremost.

Usually the people who are closet to the alcoholic will display codependant behavior, and working to correct and overcome this will greatly improve the lives you you, your children and ultimately your children's father.

You can't "make" an alcoholic change. You can't force them to stop their destructive behavior. A lot of the behavior you described sounds to me like he is in denial about how damaging his behavior is to those around him. Right now, he's living in a world that hasn't touched him with serious enough consequences to make him question the his choices/behavior.

He blames you because he refuses to look at himself. If he's projecting onto you, then somewhere deep down inside of him he does know that he is to blame for your leaving.

You aren't responsible for his choices and behavior. You can't "fix" him. You have to worry about yourself and your children and the things in YOUR life that you DO have control and are responsible for.

I don't want to write a novel, so I'll try to cut to the chase:

Lots of people talk about DNA, genetics, bla bla bla -- the fact is, there honestly hasn't been much in the way of credible scientific research to indicate that alcoholism is some kind of inherited or genetic "disease". Even the twin studies that have been conducted weren't all that conclusive.

What IS known from case studies over decades of interviewing and studying alcoholics is one reoccurring theme:

Powerlessness.

At some level, in some way, in the recesses of the alcoholic they feel powerless or not in control of their life of situation in life.

Drinking alcohol is a direct, quick, and easy way for someone to assert control over how they feel (emotionally and physically). It is something THEY can do for themselves. When alcoholics were asked to go back and examine the thoughts and circumstances just before any episode of drinking, we almost always uncover some feeling of "taking back control" or taking back power over a situation of emotional state.

There might be alcoholics in here that'll remember thinking, "I'm going to have some beer, dammit, and you can't stop me!" Or perhaps going to the liquor store angry, and deciding to drink because they're upset/pissed off at someone/something. A "forget this, I'm getting drunk" attitude.

Turning off or tuning out because you don't want to or can't deal with a situation you don't have control over is a common feeling among alcoholics. Many "check out" after a stressful day that they can't figure out how to manage.

The only thing I can say is that the more you work on improving yourself, your life, and the lives of your children -- the more positive effect it tends to have on the alcoholic.

This sounds harsh but it needs to be said: You can't save everyone, not everyone wants to be saved, and not everyone should be saved. It's painful, but sometimes you have to cut your losses and move on. You deserve to be happy and live a life full of joy and abundance. You have the power to make your life and the lives of your children wonderful.

If you are buying into his projection games and feeling guilt, accepting empty apologies and allowing your ex to continue being a negative and destructive influence on you and your kids -- you are essentially condoning and saying his behavior is acceptable as part of your world.

You deserve better. You deserve more. Your children especially deserve more.

Get a protective order if you have to, and steer clear from this man until he's decided he wants to sort his life out and approach you from a place of sobriety. Until you do this, you are essentially rewarding his negative behavior by allowing him to reach you.

If you get word he's making solid, real, and honest progress you might decide at some point to SLOWLY re-introduce yourself (not the kids yet) and offer positive support and reinforcement.

Sorry for the long post ... I've been in a lot of rooms, talked to a lot of people. A few doing great, many missing and some likely now dead.

The long and short? DO YOU. Take control over your life and the lives of your children. Don't allow this guy to drag you down, foul you and their lives along with his.



posted on May, 20 2016 @ 10:04 PM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

I'm curious, Mystik,

How would you relate whatever degree of attachment disorder you have--and I'd say it HAS to be significant--for you to have drank so much--but from your perspective--

Please talk about the connection between your early life attachment disorder stuff and drinking. I think that might be extremely enlightening to folks.



posted on May, 20 2016 @ 10:09 PM
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a reply to: SwiperNoSwiping

I strongly encourage your quitting.

Your pattern indicates a serious alcohol problem. It may take longer for it to more devastatingly influence your life--but if you continue drinking, THAT DAY WILL COME.

Establishing closer relationships with folks who don't drink at all would likely be important to crucial.

Certainly some sort of group activity that affirms your sobriety would be good. AA is that for many. There are others . . . like CELEBRATE RECOVERY.

May you be very decisive in making decisions and taking steps to improve your life and relationships greatly.

blessings,
BoX



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