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Most people are not smart, they're average.

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posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 09:50 AM
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originally posted by: Klassified

originally posted by: MagnaCarta2015
Even a genius is capable of doing dumb s**** from time to time.

True. Some of the smartest people I've ever met, were also some of the dumbest people I've ever met. Being able to do complicated calculations in your head, does not necessarily qualify you to take the dog for a walk. Seriously.
(You in general. Not you personally.)


Common sense is rarer than rainbow coloured unicorns these days.




posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 09:53 AM
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a reply to: SugarDaddy

All you have to do is open an IQ thread and the humblebrag will come out in mass

Search around it is there.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 09:57 AM
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originally posted by: KyoZero
a reply to: SugarDaddy

All you have to do is open an IQ thread and the humblebrag will come out in mass

Search around it is there.


How can you use a thread specifically tailored to attract people who think they're smart, and then infer that the thread audience is representative for the whole site?

OP said something along the lines of "on ATS most people think they are geniuses and others stupid".

I disagree with that point in particular, but I do agree that most people on ATS do think they are special.


Also seriously most of these online IQ tests are so basic most people will score super high. It's just a clickbait for Facebook, not a scientific test.


People posting their scores from online tests are basically showing to the world how vain and naive they are.
edit on 28-4-2016 by SugarDaddy because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 11:02 AM
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originally posted by: SugarDaddy
I never got the impression that many people on ATS think they're smart.


Those were your words. What I am saying is all you have to do is start an IQ thread and immediately AS members will crawl from the woodwork to humblebrag but insinuate that they are very smart. It's almost instantaneous that the proposed or claimed 150-200 IQs will come out. It will be followed by "but it's really not a big deal" which is then followed by "but I understand things people don't"

You made the assertion that not many people think they are smart and I was saying, "start and IQ thread" and you'll see plenty of ATS members come out with that exact statement...but in a very faux-humble way



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 11:14 AM
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If dysfunction, is some kind of function, then I must be some kind of GE NI US.




posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 11:38 AM
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originally posted by: DeviantMortal
a reply to: Plotus

Why do you think they call it average? Certainly not because it is uncommen.


Ah... Words of Wisdom! I've ruffled many feathers on this one over the years.

I graduated high school in 1970 and side-tracked more than one of my classes on this, especially my psychology class. Parents with extreme expectations and students with lofty aspirations drive a system in which the original meaning of the grading system in place at that time is no longer logical in relation to the scores I was seeing on report cards.

A parent or student despondent about bringing home a B- minus in a class places the C+ student in the position of, rather than feeling pride for doing slightly better than average, feelings as if they've only been a small disappointment. That perspective makes the B+ and A- students nearly excellent and slightly excellent, respectively. Most outrageous of all are the A and A+ because they are what is hoped for and expected.

When grades of A or above become the norm, the C grade in actuality has become an F+++ and the grading system has become nothing but a semantic joke because an A is now, in fact, a C (average)!!!!

I learned a lesson in self-control in my PASCAL class. My professor and future employer (who genuinely is a genius at programming) was more than capable of being an obnoxious, sarcastic S-O-B in the classroom and at that time still regarded my "toy" computer with disdain but allowed me to do assignments that I could at home. A company named Kyan had a wonderful Atari compatible version of PASCAL with reference manuals that never failed me when I needed to find machine specific examples.

When I got one particular assignment back, I had to force myself to take a few breaths and make sure I was composed before I spoke up because I'd already been singled out for ridicule before the class more times than I bothered to count. Seeing the grade ABCD+ struck me as one of his jabs but I was respectful when finally I asked for an explanation. Because the assignment was a simple database program and I had included the machine commands for opening a new file on my drive, adding new records then searching and editing fields as well as a flexible module for printing reports to my Epson printer, my grade stood for Above and Beyond the Call of Duty (a grade he'd only given once before, ironically to the guy I would work for after I left his company).

A valuable life lesson on not beginning an interchange with hostility!



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 12:56 PM
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Another one of these threads.

Being a genius holds no bearing on intellegence if the intellegence isn't instilled.

I am considered a high genius via standardized test.

In the 3rd grade my reading/Geography teacher Ms. Ryan of Youens Elementary suggested I be put in decelerated learning courses. This was due to the fact that I hated reading due to anxiety, sucked at spelling and did not know how to do cross word puzzles.

I was not read to as a child, as dyslexia ran in my family there wasn't a name for it yet. Both my mother and my sister have it.

Turns out I actually had it to some degree but over came it due to the sheer capabililty of my mind to adapt.

My point being Genius has to be nurtured. I ended up having to nurture myself after being forced to learn to read; I fell in love with knowledge and creating.

Had I had the proper structure growing up, I'd probably be an avant on a multitude of basis.

Choosing what to be monumental at is the hardest decision for a genius, because one wants to do it all.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 01:23 PM
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originally posted by: ForteanOrg
a reply to: rukia

Being bright is not something to brag about, you were born that way. It's both a gift and a curse. Intelligent people know this, and they act accordingly: you will never find an intelligent person that brags about it, nor denies it. It's merely a given.


I agree that awareness and specialization can be both a gift and a curse. You can learn things other have not when you push awareness. And all people can do this. It is time that matters and staying on track.

Everyone might not be able to do all the thoughts Einstein did in one lifetime. But that do not mean they cannot do it in many lifetimes if they push themselves. Commitment and time.

When you specialize and get an unusual outlook there is less souls to discuss with. Introvert searching finding something making even more introvert since other cannot discuss findings in same context.

But are we not all here a little on the outside when we choose to discuss things on a board that is trying to look outside the mainstream boxes?
edit on 28-4-2016 by LittleByLittle because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 01:28 PM
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This is a great post. I have struggled with this observation all my life. Being tested with a high iq has not helped one bit with my personal social interactions to the point I try to keep alot of my knowledge just silent. Quite often I feel misunderstood or if not in the majority just shoved to the side. Sadly, I have had to observe my adult son struggle socially, he has a really high iq (just a test to me) and in his jobs even thought he does quite well he does not understand the politics in the office. Whereas, I have enough experience to usually socialize in an acceptable level, tho I don't enjoy it; he is working way beneath his mental abilities but found solace in a job with little social interaction.
I feel that at least at my age there is so much more that I don't know than I thought I did. Thank God, for ATS and all the nuggets of knowledge and inspiration I have found here.



posted on Apr, 28 2016 @ 01:48 PM
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a reply to: Justso

Social interaction seems to be more emotional, than logical; or at least the way in which it is logical, for the need of it, is creating bonds and trusts between individuals (but it involves acting, inventing information, inventing and producing personality, becoming an actor, producing character, characteristic, which is not necessarily real or logical, until it is invented and perpetuated; we are all not perfect computer machines), it is individuals testing one another to determine if each other are trust worthy. An individual who may be very imaginative, genius, in terms of thought process etc. is so, because likely they spend a lot of time in their head, thinking; whereas social interaction forces one to leave the perfect realm of the mind into the potentially complex, potentially unreasonable and illogical world of animals and emotions.

A person who is very intelligent, imaginative, lives in an unseen world of their mind, and may struggle with thoughts and uncertainties about themselves and the world; fear of judgement, harsh on themselves; understanding that others can think in potentially various ways, and about them; when I am in social interactions, which is extremely rare, I have a hard time not imagining what all others are potentially thinking, and attempting to determine the ways and rates at which others are lying or attempting to manipulate. I know how easy it is to lie and be fake (oh and potentially the worst part, how often the lying is to ones self, how people can change from day to day, minute to minute year to year, not knowing themselves, so how can I trust to know one), so it is difficult to trust others, or even interact with others; especially as you mention of your son, in environments with hierarchies and pecking orders
edit on 28-4-2016 by ImaFungi because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 10:31 AM
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originally posted by: rukia


This is a great rant -- and a great reason to rant!

One of my brothers is a certified genius. His SAT scores were crazy high. Math, science, computers, languages, music -- he's a freakin whiz. And he sure keeps me humble! But he's very humble himself, and is the first to say that no matter how much he learns, it just tells him how much more there is to learn. I've never observed him in his professional life (although I know he played a major role in making it possible for us to be here -- on the internet!), but I know in his personal life he never ever speaks to his amazing IQ and intelligence, though he is always happy to share what he knows. And he's great at explaining very complex issues and subjects in easily understood terms without talking down to people. I know -- he got me through algebra and calculus and trig. But he also knows his limits, and respects the skill and know-how of others. When I have computer problems or science questions, I call him... but when he has car problems or other mechanical problems, he calls my husband!

I have thought of my brother often as I've read the recent comments about IQ and folks calling others stupid and it always brings me back to the same thought: When you've really got it, you don't have to flaunt it.

But in the final analysis, I think this is more about ego than IQ. I include the recent spate of threads posted asking us who our "favorite" or "smartest" or "whatever-est" ATSers are. I was shocked when I first saw that. Are we still in high school trying to be the popular kids? Is this now the ATS equivalent of a Slam Book? No good can come of that. But it does create divisions and exclusions and serves to create a pseudo-hierarchy of sorts. If folks want to have a mutual admiration society, okay... but I refuse to be part of it.
edit on 29-4-2016 by Boadicea because: formatting... grrrrr!



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 01:25 PM
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originally posted by: Boadicea

originally posted by: rukia

-- snip --
And he's great at explaining very complex issues and subjects in easily understood terms without talking down to people. I know -- he got me through algebra and calculus and trig.


Boy could I have used his help in HS!! I almost Majored in Freshman Algebra... Seriously.

At that time the shoe box sized 4 function calculators hadn't even come out yet. To make matters worse, our school only had that one math instructor and his love for the subject only included students who already "Got It." I was constantly told the same thing, "Stop asking me Why! This isn't an English class, this is a Math class! You don't ask Why in a Math class! This (pointing toward an example on the board) is how to do it. Period!"

I'm not exaggerating, either. He would get so flummoxed his ears would turn red.

His attitude was the #1 reason I flunked the class twice. The guidance counselor my first two years of HS was 81 and inflexible with me on this. He considered algebra a required course and that meant that I was subjected to round two. My teacher Mr. "M" openly expressed his displeasure at my presence in his classroom and never once did anything to help me gain any fundamental understanding of how algebra could ever be of use to me.

Years later, when I began to learn programming, I saw some similarity between the two but algebra still seems, to me, like a form of programming in which you have to already know and understand the workings of a module or subroutine you are passing values to. To the best of my knowledge, algebra was nothing but a total waste of quite a few hours of my life.



But he also knows his limits, and respects the skill and know-how of others. When I have computer problems or science questions, I call him... but when he has car problems or other mechanical problems, he calls my husband!


Several times here at ATS I've posted that everyone could benefit from occasionally reminding themselves that the smartest person in the world is ignorant of something. Kind of a shame that the word has grown to be thought of as a synonym for stupid or dim-witted when it only means lack of knowledge on a given subject. More than likely I will die with a book in my hands, but there's no shame in saying that I'll pass away ignorant.



I have thought of my brother often as I've read the recent comments about IQ and folks calling others stupid and it always brings me back to the same thought: When you've really got it, you don't have to flaunt it.

But in the final analysis, I think this is more about ego than IQ.


Agreed. My wife and I know a serious birder. She has co-written a couple well received books on the subject as well as doing columns that have appeared in national publications. Often (when we get the chance to visit) she'll stop mid-story because she's afraid it's become boring and I'll need to reassure her that she wasn't seeing my eyes glaze over in boredom. I'll be thinking of an analogy that I can relate to my own experiences.



If folks want to have a mutual admiration society, okay... but I refuse to be part of it.


Here is where I have my personal conflict with posting...

There will be lengthy periods when it just doesn't feel worth it. Then I'll check in and it seems there are situations and topics that other members are interested in and wanting to share opinions and information, some new and some I'm familiar with and have my own opinions/conclusions about.

For a while I go through a burst of creative enthusiasm in which I spend time digging up source/background material and writing lengthy posts and taking time to think about any replies before responding (often with more time and energy than with the earlier posts). Then comes the period that negativity becomes more noticeable in both the newer threads and the ones I've been following and I find myself taking another extended vacation from posting and only checking in periodically.

Possibly that's just the normal ebb and flow of things, I'm not sure.



posted on Apr, 29 2016 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: CornShucker


Boy could I have used his help in HS!! I almost Majored in Freshman Algebra... Seriously.


I watched my daughter go through the same thing. It was absolute torture for her. Some kids are just not mathematically inclined, but it was required. And I really don't think the teachers (at least most) understand it much better, hence the problem teaching it. When I spoke to one of her math teachers after she had received a "D", the teacher told me I should be happy because most of the class had failed. I told her that was a problem with the teaching, not the kids... needless to say she didn't like that much. But it is what it is.


For a while I go through a burst of creative enthusiasm in which I spend time digging up source/background material and writing lengthy posts and taking time to think about any replies before responding (often with more time and energy than with the earlier posts). Then comes the period that negativity becomes more noticeable in both the newer threads and the ones I've been following and I find myself taking another extended vacation from posting and only checking in periodically.

Possibly that's just the normal ebb and flow of things, I'm not sure.


I think it's definitely become the normal ebb and flow! But only because there are those who make it so. It's healthy to take a break occasionally... just don't let anyone drive you away permanently. We all have a "real" life to attend to, and it's good to switch focus for a while and get a new perspective and come back with fresh ideas and new eyes.

But you seem to be pretty well grounded and you're figuring out how to handle the ebb and flow, so I'm not worried



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 02:38 PM
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I read a quote before that seemed to hit the mark:

"Smart people talk about ideas, average people talk about things, and stupid people talk about people."



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 03:01 PM
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a reply to: rukia

Somewhere, the spirit of Mathematics is weeping.

Her woes start in the first paragraph of the original post and gradually overwhelm her.

On the other hand, this is the internet. There are plenty of Vietnam vet PhDs with ten inch schlongs who saw Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 04:49 PM
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originally posted by: Schmoe1223
I read a quote before that seemed to hit the mark:

"Smart people talk about ideas, average people talk about things, and stupid people talk about people."


Jesus Christ that quote is brilliant.




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