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Obama Admin Tells Landlords They Can’t Refuse To House Criminals

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posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:22 PM
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originally posted by: Edumakated

originally posted by: enlightenedservant
a reply to: JustAnObservation

What crimes are you talking about? Jaywalking? Speeding? Possession of maryjane, which isn't even a crime in many places in the US now?

Because, yes, I still think that once someone has paid their debt to society, they should be free. That's the whole point in crime and punishment. There should not be a life sentence for most of these things. That's why you serve your sentence in jail or on parole.

But I will never agree that if someone commits a crime and does their govt mandated punishment, they should also be forbidden from getting a good job or have a legal place to stay. That's literally creating a 2nd class of citizens, which is something I'll never agree with. If society feels that the initial sentencing isn't long enough, they need to change the laws. But punishing people beyond that society's mandated sentence is just wrong, especially since most "criminals" aren't even violent offenders.

Then again, I believe firmly in rehabilitation over punishment. Hmm... I feel like I'm repeating myself. I don't feel the desire to keep typing the same things so I think I'll just leave it at this (unless I get responses on different aspects of this issue).


Hypothetical...

You have a daughter. She brings home a guy who has served time for beating the snot out of his prior girlfriend. Only been out six months. Are you telling me you are going to just ignore the guy's past life?

I get what you are saying, but I think you are being naive.

Despite what we may want, your past does have an impact on how people will view you.


Thats why there needs to be DISCRETION.

No a person convicted of fraud should not be allowed to work in a bank or a job handling money. And if they apply for a job in that area a revord should be flagged up.
For other jobs no? The past crime should not be flagged up.

A ex drug dealer should not be allowed to work around chemicals. But if they want to work in a bank? Sure.

Pedos and rapists? Meh screw them.




posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:29 PM
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a reply to: xuenchen

This isn't an easy problem to resolve. I personally believe a property owner (or a business owner) should have every right to discriminate against anyone they wish to, at their choice alone, simply because they own 100% of the risk in their business. That said, I'm reminded of an old Merle Haggard song:


At the very least, it should depend on the crime involved. If you're dealing with a sex criminal, you should have the right to tell them "GTFO and don't come back looking for a rental." Not so sure I feel that way in regards to white collar criminals or any nonfelon.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:32 PM
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originally posted by: Aazadan

originally posted by: crazyewok
Maybe thats why laws like this are needed?

If you released from prison and you cant fi d work or a place to live then your just going to fall back into crime.


Most people in the US seem to grasp this concept, but everyone also has this mentality that they don't want to be the one to do it. It should always be someone else who has to take the risk. That's what you get from a nation whose most employable job skill is doing nothing other than passing the buck to someone else.


Why don't you set an example. Let me know when you hire a convicted Pedo to chaperon your son's scout troop.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:36 PM
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originally posted by: Edumakated
Why don't you set an example. Let me know when you hire a convicted Pedo to chaperon your son's scout troop.


It depends on how long ago it was, the type of crime should also be taken into account.

There's nothing wrong with a pedo working at a bank but it's probably not the best idea to hire them in a day care. If someone was convicted of theft you likely don't want them handling money, but making them act as an office secretary? No problems there unless you're really really concerned about those office pens.

Similarly, someone who sold drugs probably isn't going to destroy the apartment you're renting out but someone convicted of a violent crime might. Even violent felons need homes though, and I could see this being reasonably handled through something like requiring extra insurance to cover damages.
edit on 6-4-2016 by Aazadan because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:41 PM
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originally posted by: crazyewok
originally posted by: xuenchen

If you released from prison and you cant fi d work or a place to live then your just going to fall back into crime.



Yes, and that proves some people are habitual criminals.




posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:46 PM
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originally posted by: Aazadan

originally posted by: Edumakated
Why don't you set an example. Let me know when you hire a convicted Pedo to chaperon your son's scout troop.


It depends on how long ago it was, the type of crime should also be taken into account.

There's nothing wrong with a pedo working at a bank but it's probably not the best idea to hire them in a day care. If someone was convicted of theft you likely don't want them handling money, but making them act as an office secretary? No problems there unless you're really really concerned about those office pens.

Similarly, someone who sold drugs probably isn't going to destroy the apartment you're renting out but someone convicted of a violent crime might. Even violent felons need homes though, and I could see this being reasonably handled through something like requiring extra insurance to cover damages.


And this is why landlords need to be able to use discretion in determining if that person's record is an issue. Everyone has different levels of tolerance and risk. If you don't want to be stuck in this gray area where criminal actions affect your life... don't commit crimes.



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 03:46 PM
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originally posted by: xuenchen

originally posted by: crazyewok
originally posted by: xuenchen

If you released from prison and you cant fi d work or a place to live then your just going to fall back into crime.



Yes, and that proves some people are habitual criminals.



I would like to throw you out on the street with $50.
No place to live.
A record that stopa you from getting jobs
Contact numbers of criminals.


Then see how long it takes for you to last without turning to crime



posted on Apr, 6 2016 @ 04:04 PM
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originally posted by: crazyewok

I would like to throw you out on the street with $50.
No place to live.
A record that stopa you from getting jobs
Contact numbers of criminals.


Then see how long it takes for you to last without turning to crime


LOL always with the innuendos

I know several people who got back on their feet after jail terms.

All by themselves too.

Those are the ones who are not career criminals.





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