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Saturn V Apollo 11 - Ultra slow motion launch pad video. One of my favourites to rewatch

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posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 09:18 AM
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originally posted by: Quantum12
a reply to: Bedlam

It amazes me that in July, 1969 people landed on the moon. Now NASA can't even send a fork to the ISS. We pay Russia millions for a taxi ride.


Priorities change for various reasons, I'd suppose.




posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 11:43 AM
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originally posted by: Quantum12
a reply to: Bedlam

It amazes me that in July, 1969 people landed on the moon. Now NASA can't even send a fork to the ISS. We pay Russia millions for a taxi ride.

NASA now has the option to pay SpaceX Corporation, Orbital Sciences Corp, or ESA (European Space Agency) to send forks and other supplies to the ISS without paying Russia. However, NASA needs the Russians at the moment if they want to send people to the ISS (and/or bring them back).

I say "at the moment" because both SpaceX and Boeing are planning to be able to send people to the ISS within a few years as part of NASA's Commercial Crew Development Program (or CCDev).

In accordance with NASA's CCDev planned timeline for crew transportation services to the ISS, both SpaceX and Boeing have manned test flights to the ISS coming up next year and the year after, and hope to have their crew capsules operational in three years (by 2019).

edit on 3/14/2016 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

1. The suction is called the Venturi effect. The racing exhaust from the engines increases the airflow velocity which decreases the pressure around, causing suction. (I only know this because the F-14 fuel system used this concept to move gas).

4. Don't forget that one of the basic outputs of organic combustion is H2O. But they also dumped millions of gallons of water around/on the pad, splashing everything.



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 12:04 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Thank you for the great info Soylent Green Is People! Do you think the Space Shuttle program could have lasted until 2019 so we did not have to pay Russia? Or was it too expensive? Or dangerous?

Does outsourcing Boeing and SpaceX to take us to the ISS save NASA money?
edit on 14-3-2016 by Quantum12 because: Spelling



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 12:48 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace
I love that video too, especially seeing how the power of the final thrust sucks the smoke back into the pit.

I've sped this footage up approximately to real-time speed:

www.youtube.com...

This looks like real hell, like being inside a nuke blast zone.


That's awesome man. Thanks for doing that. I also LOVE how the power if the engines sucks everything in..all the ice following a curved path .



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 12:53 PM
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originally posted by: Quantum12
a reply to: Bedlam

It amazes me that in July, 1969 people landed on the moon. Now NASA can't even send a fork to the ISS. We pay Russia millions for a taxi ride.


Sure. But it's only temporary. And Nasa would not have been able to create a New Horizons or Cassini mission back in 1969. They are still doing incredible things. They just don't have a reusable rocket/ship. Give it a few years. Also. .dont forget the most important thing. . Money.

It's all down to money. That's the only reason they could land on the Moon in 1969 and the only reason they don't have a shuttle 2.0 operating today. Don't blame NASA. Blame congress (im drm the UK..i assume congress image the right people to blame?)



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 12:56 PM
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I get it. NASA had money cut. I am sure they would build Space Shuttle 2.0.
edit on 14-3-2016 by Quantum12 because: Mad mistake



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 01:49 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Bedlam, did you get to see the Apollo 17 launch?



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 01:53 PM
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originally posted by: OneBigMonkeyToo
Some more Saturn V launch porn





Awww man. I am saving that video. That is a stunning video. Never seen it before . Thank you!



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 02:05 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

3danimator2014, how is it the recorder did not melt? Was it placed far back and zoomed? Just an amazing video.



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 02:21 PM
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originally posted by: Quantum12
a reply to: 3danimator2014

3danimator2014, how is it the recorder did not melt? Was it placed far back and zoomed? Just an amazing video.

The video narrator said it was behind a quartz Window. So I'm guessing it was in a fire-resistant housing.


edit on 3/14/2016 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 02:26 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: Quantum12
a reply to: 3danimator2014

3danimator2014, how is it the recorder did not melt? Was it placed far back and zoomed? Just an amazing video.

The video narrator said it was behind a quartz Window. So I'm guessing it was in a fire-resistant housing.



I know he said that...but im still having trouble imagine the housing that could protect 16mm film from THAT.



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 02:31 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: Quantum12
a reply to: 3danimator2014

3danimator2014, how is it the recorder did not melt? Was it placed far back and zoomed? Just an amazing video.

The video narrator said it was behind a quartz Window. So I'm guessing it was in a fire-resistant housing.



I dont think so...doesn't look zoomed in. And the water from the suppession system is hitting the glass.
I think it's just a a kick ass enclosure with a quartz window. Really quite astounding engineering. The enclosure not the Saturn V ...lol
edit on 14-3-2016 by 3danimator2014 because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-3-2016 by 3danimator2014 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

LOL, your right! The water hits the Quartz. 3183 deg f is the melting point of quartz glass. Fused with silica. I wonder how thick the Quartz glass was they used.



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 02:50 PM
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originally posted by: Quantum12
a reply to: 3danimator2014

LOL, your right! The water hits the Quartz. 3183 deg f is the melting point of quartz glass. Fused with silica. I wonder how thick the Quartz glass was they used.


What i find amazing, and you can really see it in Wildespaces real time video, is the strength of the buffeting from the engines. That and the heat and the sound vibrations at ground zero must have made it hell on earth. Any birds sitting earby must have had a rude awakening.



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 03:00 PM
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The reason the viewing stands were so far away is because they reckoned that if the whole thing went pop that's how far away you needed to be to not get hit by some of it.

Incredible to think there are three guys sat on top of that thing.



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 03:21 PM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014

originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: Quantum12
a reply to: 3danimator2014

3danimator2014, how is it the recorder did not melt? Was it placed far back and zoomed? Just an amazing video.

The video narrator said it was behind a quartz Window. So I'm guessing it was in a fire-resistant housing.



I know he said that...but im still having trouble imagine the housing that could protect 16mm film from THAT.


When I said "housing", I meant an enclosure for the cameras, including the quartz window, not a "camera housing". If the metal towers for the hold-down arms could survive the launch without collapsing (or melting), then I think some sort of metal enclosure with insulation could protect a camera.



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 06:19 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

Thanks so very much for that video!

I have always had an interest in rockets. Maybe it was just growing up in the 1950s-60s. I was four years old when my parents herded us out of our house one night, to see Sputnik 1 pass overhead. I still remember that ball of light passing overhead, not realizing at the time exactly its significance. In a couple years, my favorite book would be a childrens book about a rocket trip to Mars. In a couple more years, we were practicing duck-and-cover in school, because we knew that missiles from Russia could one day end Life as we new it. There were good rockets and bad rockets.

I followed the X-15 program, because a person could kiss the edge of space in a craft with a rocket engine. But it was a rocket that could not only "slip the surly bonds of Earth" but allow us to go into space!

I was a surly teenager in the backseat of my parents' car one humid July day on the Los Angeles freeways, regretting I had been forced to visit my older sister and not at home playing my records. My Dad turned on the car radio, and after fine tuning a station, we heard the announcement that Apollo 11 had landed a man on the moon. It was a notion incomprehensible to us, even though we had followed the space program in newspapers and on the nightly news; but at that very moment, we knew humanity had changed. A human had left the Earth and was now walking on the Moon.

After decades filled with shuttle launches, I would subscribe to satellite tv and radio and use GPS and Google Earth, thanks to rockets. Maybe one day, humans will arrive in space via a different system, but I am grateful to have lived when the science, the engineering, the people involved in rockets made this all possible. That video is awesome and magical!



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 06:55 PM
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originally posted by: desert
a reply to: 3danimator2014

Thanks so very much for that video!

I have always had an interest in rockets. Maybe it was just growing up in the 1950s-60s. I was four years old when my parents herded us out of our house one night, to see Sputnik 1 pass overhead. I still remember that ball of light passing overhead, not realizing at the time exactly its significance. In a couple years, my favorite book would be a childrens book about a rocket trip to Mars. In a couple more years, we were practicing duck-and-cover in school, because we knew that missiles from Russia could one day end Life as we new it. There were good rockets and bad rockets.

I followed the X-15 program, because a person could kiss the edge of space in a craft with a rocket engine. But it was a rocket that could not only "slip the surly bonds of Earth" but allow us to go into space!

I was a surly teenager in the backseat of my parents' car one humid July day on the Los Angeles freeways, regretting I had been forced to visit my older sister and not at home playing my records. My Dad turned on the car radio, and after fine tuning a station, we heard the announcement that Apollo 11 had landed a man on the moon. It was a notion incomprehensible to us, even though we had followed the space program in newspapers and on the nightly news; but at that very moment, we knew humanity had changed. A human had left the Earth and was now walking on the Moon.

After decades filled with shuttle launches, I would subscribe to satellite tv and radio and use GPS and Google Earth, thanks to rockets. Maybe one day, humans will arrive in space via a different system, but I am grateful to have lived when the science, the engineering, the people involved in rockets made this all possible. That video is awesome and magical!


Thats VERY cool mate. That your parents took you out to see Sputnik is amazing. Its experiences like this that that shape us. I am suprised to hear that you could see it, i always assumed Sputnik was too small.

I had seen many satellites pass overhead in my life but for me, a moment i will always remember is being awake in our flat (my wife and I) at around 5 am and me going on our balcony to look at the stars, the sun was just about to rise, so there wasa thin band of blue light and i looked up and saw the ISS, glistening so incredibly brightly in the predawn sun. Id never seen it and i watchd its silent motion towards the sunset...it took me a second to figure out what that must have been. it was so beautiful. After that i made a point to try to watch it anytime it was up there. I must have seen it close to 100 times by now.

I even took the microphone at my best friends outdoor wedding in Greece and pointed it out to everyone. haha.

If you like rockets, and are partial to chemistry (no formulas, dont worry)...can i recommed a book called "Ignition!". Its written by a guy who ws at the forefront of rocket fuel right from the get-go. He doesnt get bogged down in anything boring, just has great stories to tell like "we tried x + y and it blew up and destroyed the building"

Its out of print but you can find it easily as a PDF download. Not sure im allowed to post the link here, so i wont. I will say that i loved the pdf so much, i bought a print of the book for $200 . I love it, still re read it. Message me if you are interested and i can send you a link.



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 06:57 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: 3danimator2014

originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: Quantum12
a reply to: 3danimator2014

3danimator2014, how is it the recorder did not melt? Was it placed far back and zoomed? Just an amazing video.

The video narrator said it was behind a quartz Window. So I'm guessing it was in a fire-resistant housing.



I know he said that...but im still having trouble imagine the housing that could protect 16mm film from THAT.


When I said "housing", I meant an enclosure for the cameras, including the quartz window, not a "camera housing". If the metal towers for the hold-down arms could survive the launch without collapsing (or melting), then I think some sort of metal enclosure with insulation could protect a camera.



True. It was really more the film that im im pressed survived.




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