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Saturn V Apollo 11 - Ultra slow motion launch pad video. One of my favourites to rewatch

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posted on Mar, 13 2016 @ 08:58 PM
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Hi all,

I just thought i would share one of my all time favourite rocket launch videos (and i watch a lot..haha) .

This was taken from camera E-8 at the Apollo 11 launch. Its narrated and is ultra slow motion and is actually situated on the pad itself. Just...watch and be in awe of this mighty machine. And remember, this was filmed in the 60s, long before digital cameras.

On a side note, i cant even imagine how big that spool of film was. How they kept it all safe from that fire and hot gas is beyond me.





posted on Mar, 13 2016 @ 09:17 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

Never seen that before. Awesome.



posted on Mar, 13 2016 @ 09:25 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

Awesome. Thanks for posting this.



posted on Mar, 13 2016 @ 09:32 PM
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Great video eh?





posted on Mar, 13 2016 @ 09:44 PM
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originally posted by: 3danimator2014
Hi all,

I just thought i would share one of my all time favourite rocket launch videos (and i watch a lot..haha) .

This was taken from camera E-8 at the Apollo 11 launch. Its narrated and is ultra slow motion and is actually situated on the pad itself. Just...watch and be in awe of this mighty machine. And remember, this was filmed in the 60s, long before digital cameras.

On a side note, i cant even imagine how big that spool of film was. How they kept it all safe from that fire and hot gas is beyond me.






I have never seen this angle before!!!

I am such a Saturn V fanboy too, every time I see it or a reference to it I go off on a tangent while my beautiful lady does her best to not let me see her rolling her eyes lol.

I'm going to make her watch this too, lol, she will love it!!
edit on 13-3-2016 by Sargeras because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2016 @ 09:45 PM
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originally posted by: Sargeras

originally posted by: 3danimator2014
Hi all,

I just thought i would share one of my all time favourite rocket launch videos (and i watch a lot..haha) .

This was taken from camera E-8 at the Apollo 11 launch. Its narrated and is ultra slow motion and is actually situated on the pad itself. Just...watch and be in awe of this mighty machine. And remember, this was filmed in the 60s, long before digital cameras.

On a side note, i cant even imagine how big that spool of film was. How they kept it all safe from that fire and hot gas is beyond me.






I have never seen this angle before!!!

I am such a Saturn V famous too, end went time I see it or a reference to it I go off on a tangent while my beautiful lady does her best to not let me see her rolling her eyes lol.

I'm going to make her watch this too, lol, she will love it!!


I played it to my wife and she loved it. One of the few things i show her that she enjoyed. (no my c*ck jokes please)



posted on Mar, 13 2016 @ 10:02 PM
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a reply to: 3danimator2014

Wow! All I can say is that is an awesome video. Thank you for sharing it!



posted on Mar, 13 2016 @ 11:33 PM
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Wow...just wow! That incredible video indicates that there's a lot going on that we're unaware of...

1. Why did the fire get sucked back in to the well under the engines immediately after ignition?
2. What is the "stuff" coming off the side the rocket and falling to the ground during ignition..looks like someone up above the camera's view emptied their trash, LOL.
3. Shouldn't those little structures that had latches on the rocket have been obliterated?
4. Did the atmosphere get so disturbed that it started raining?!?!
5. Is there an explanation of the processes we're seeing in this awesome vid, and what's causing them?

I've seen video from inside the Space Shuttle crew cabin as it heads to space, but nothing showing a slow-motion HD outside view of the Apollo 11 (or any other) launch. Thank-you 3dAnimator2014 for posting this incredible video. It is REAL and UNALTERED isn't it?
edit on 3/13/2016 by carewemust because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2016 @ 11:34 PM
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I love that video too, especially seeing how the power of the final thrust sucks the smoke back into the pit.

I've sped this footage up approximately to real-time speed:

www.youtube.com...

This looks like real hell, like being inside a nuke blast zone.



posted on Mar, 13 2016 @ 11:38 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

That is so awesome. Real time launch speed. Nice work!



posted on Mar, 13 2016 @ 11:48 PM
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originally posted by: carewemust
Wow...just wow! That incredible video indicates that there's a lot going on that we're unaware of...

1. Why did the fire get sucked back in to the well under the engines immediately after ignition?


Under the rocket are flame trenches. It's a sort of ducting system for the exhaust. Once the exhaust starts flowing down the trenches, the momentum of the gases creates a vacuum that sucks the exhaust away



2. What is the "stuff" coming off the side the rocket and falling to the ground during ignition..looks like someone up above the camera's view emptied their trash, LOL.


The engine is chock full of liquid hydrogen and oxygen. And it's Florida. Very humid. So once fueled, the engine becomes coated with a thick rind of ice. Which falls off when the engines start.



3. Shouldn't those little structures that had latches on the rocket have been obliterated?


The LUT was designed like a tank, but AFAIK, it did sustain damage on every launch and had to be repaired each time. Not melted down sort of damaged, but I assume the wiring and plumbing bit it each time. Oberg would have more detail.



4. Did the atmosphere get so disturbed that it started raining?!?!


Not typically, but if you launched through a thunderstorm you could (and did) cause a lightning bolt to follow the rocket trail.



posted on Mar, 13 2016 @ 11:59 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Bedlam, does the LUT hold the weight of the whole rocket?



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 12:00 AM
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Now that, is a machine.
Power to make Thor envious.



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 12:10 AM
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originally posted by: Quantum12
a reply to: Bedlam

Bedlam, does the LUT hold the weight of the whole rocket?


Delving into my ancient store of childhood knowledge, the Saturn was supported over a pit by four arms evenly spaced around the periphery of the lower engine bus.

Think of it as a big ring at the bottom, resting on four really enormous arms. They both support the stack prior to launch AND hold it down during the first seconds of takeoff until the first stage engines really start to rip.

I got to see Apollo 17 both in the VAB and whilst being trucked out to the pad from a relatively close distance. It's hard to fathom how big they are until you see it up close.



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 12:40 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Bedlam, I was in Houston 10 years ago filming by the space center. They have rockets laying horizontal. I was shocked by the size!




posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 12:45 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

The rain - is almost "real"... It is actually tons of water they poured in, the cool down the platform. A whole system for this too. The volumes this system was throwing in was just ridiculous. Tons per second or something.



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 01:15 AM
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originally posted by: deckdel
a reply to: carewemust

The rain - is almost "real"... It is actually tons of water they poured in, the cool down the platform. A whole system for this too. The volumes this system was throwing in was just ridiculous. Tons per second or something.


Oh, THAT'S what he was talking about. Yes. Also, it served to absorb the sound output of the first stage while it was near the pad.



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 01:57 AM
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Some more Saturn V launch porn





posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 07:00 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

Listen to the narrator in the video, he goes over most of your questions.



posted on Mar, 14 2016 @ 08:32 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

It amazes me that in July, 1969 people landed on the moon. Now NASA can't even send a fork to the ISS. We pay Russia millions for a taxi ride.
edit on 14-3-2016 by Quantum12 because: Spelling




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