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Strange noise on approx 11.360 Mhz NOW! - WAV file included.

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posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 11:32 AM
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This feeback is something that can be heard long distance? One guy messing up can have a large effect like this? Interesting. Don't really know anything about HAM radio




posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 03:20 PM
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sorry for the noob comment but i was jus wondering.. whats so special about these frequencies n stuff??



posted on Jan, 11 2005 @ 03:27 PM
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I was also hoping for this to be massive. This thread had the 'Contact' vibe. Maybe next time, but a very good and attentive find.



posted on Jan, 12 2005 @ 02:22 AM
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Originally posted by Klepto
have to agree about the feed back, either that or maybe the Electrician who was there had left some equipment of his/hers on that intefered with your Radio set...


It was definately nothing to do with the Electrician, my Dad could hear the same signal 50 miles away and there is another member in this thread who could hear it too.

The Ionospheric sounding does seem very likely, which is what my Dad suggested after listening to it himself for awhile.


In telecommunication, an ionospheric sounding is a technique that provides real-time data on high-frequency ionospheric-dependent radio propagation, using a basic system consisting of a synchronized transmitter and receiver.

The time delay between transmission and reception is translated into effective ionospheric layer altitude. Vertical incident sounding uses a collocated transmitter and receiver and involves directing a range of frequencies vertically to the ionosphere and measuring the values of the reflected returned signals to determine the effective ionosphere layer altitude. This technique is also used to determine the critical frequency. Oblique sounders use a transmitter at one end of a given propagation path, and a synchronized receiver, usually with an oscilloscope-type display (ionogram), at the other end. The transmitter emits a stepped- or swept-frequency signal which is displayed or measured at the receiver. The measurement converts time delay to effective altitude of the ionospheric layer. The ionogram display shows the effective altitude of the ionospheric layer as a function of frequency.


This descriptions does sound consistant with what we were hearing.



posted on Jan, 12 2005 @ 02:38 AM
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That is odd???
It sounds like mike feedback and static for the most part and those knocking sounds are eerie.



posted on Jan, 12 2005 @ 02:59 AM
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is your computer turned on when you hear this coming from your receiver? try listening for it with your computer turned off.

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posted on Jan, 12 2005 @ 03:53 AM
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As I said before,
the knocking sound was the electrician hammering in the background
- I was using the computer mike to record it.
And no it was not the computer, I did try it with it off, and as I said my Dad could hear the same signal 50 miles away and another member from the board could receive it too.

[edit on 12-1-2005 by AgentSmith]



posted on Aug, 20 2008 @ 11:48 AM
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I'm just curious what an electrician would be hammering. Did you have him locked in a cupboard with your wife? HA!!



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