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Mysterious Ancient Wall Extending Over 150km Investigated in Jordan

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posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 03:19 AM
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Mysterious Ancient Wall Extending Over 150km Investigated in Jordan

Live Science reports that the existence of the wall was first reported in 1948 by Sir Alec Kirkbride, a British diplomat in Jordan, who had seen the structure overhead while in an airplane. However, it is only now that the wall has been mapped out in detail with aerial photography by the APAAME, a long-term research project designed to illuminate settlement history in the Near East.


I remember scouring Google Earth a few years ago and finding many odd lines running/meandering for miles across not just the area in discussion but also all over North Africa and other locations. Obviously there was no way of telling how old many of those were. These however seem to be pretty interesting and old. Nearby are also the "Wheels" which if they are as old as is possibly suspected would come within striking distance of Göbekli Tepe in age, Around 8,000 to 9,000 BC



The so-called “ Works of Old Men ” are a series of giant ‘wheels’ that have been dated to approximately 8,500 years – making them older then the famous Nazca Lines in Peru by about 6,000 years.

Archaeologists are still uncertain about who constructed the giant earthworks and structures across the landscape of Jordan and what their original purpose was. It is hoped that further investigations may help to unravel some of the mystery.


The region over the past ten thousand years or so has seen drastic environmental changes, the area was, once upon a time, much more habitable than it is now. The "Fertile Crescent" still has a hidden past that we are slowly peeling back the layers and still, imho, has a lot more to teach us about the story of mans rise to civilization.

Another link : Live Science




posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 03:25 AM
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My initial response was that it's a lovely bit of geology, but some of it's definitely constructed. However, that takes time and coordination and manpower. Interesting stuff.
edit on 20-2-2016 by Byrd because: (no reason given)


+4 more 
posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 03:40 AM
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They were trying to keep the Mexicans out. They took their jobs.



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 04:56 AM
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originally posted by: skunkape23
They were trying to keep the Mexicans out. They took their jobs.

Historically that would have been the Palestinians though.



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 05:18 AM
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originally posted by: Byrd
My initial response was that it's a lovely bit of geology, but some of it's definitely constructed. However, that takes time and coordination and manpower. Interesting stuff.


Speaking of manpower. Along the trails of Chaco Canyon there are petroglyphs abound, very much like modern day billboards advertising local wildlife.

Assuming the road was travelled by even the amount of people who built it, there must be troves and troves of archeological treasure there.
edit on 20-2-2016 by Rosinitiate because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 06:12 AM
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Maybe Trump will have it shipped here so we can put it between Mexico and the US if he gets elected.



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 06:20 AM
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I personally do believe that around 13,800 to 12,700 years ago there was a major impact that set earthlings back to basically the stone age.. I do not know for sure if there were those more advanced than stick and stones before the impact... but if there were, their societies were terminated by a cosmic event and a new ice age.
So the wall builders and or any other ancient artifacts/societies that seem to date to "way back when" seems to defy some of the current theories that have floated around for years..

Hope that was on topic enough... All the ancient stuff (to me ties together) just different regions..

Either way thanks for the post S&F I like stuff like this..
www.pnas.org...-1

Abstract

One or more bolide impacts are hypothesized to have triggered the Younger Dryas cooling at ∼12.9 ka. In support of this hypothesis, varying peak abundances of magnetic grains with iridium and magnetic microspherules have been reported at the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB). We show that bulk sediment and/or magnetic grains/microspherules collected from the YDB sites in Arizona, Michigan, New Mexico, New Jersey, and Ohio have 187Os/188Os ratios ≥1.0, similar to average upper continental crust (= 1.3), indicating a terrestrial origin of osmium (Os) in these samples. In contrast, bulk sediments from YDB sites in Belgium and Pennsylvania exhibit 187Os/188Os ratios



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 06:29 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky I did an edit to post another link ... When the edited post appears the new links and added info is not included.. !!





Tiny, glassy "spherules" of rock found in a Pennsylvania flowerbed by a woman who had seen a NOVA program about the comet hypothesis. In a paper that got wide coverage last week, Dartmouth researchers argue that those spherules were hurled to Pennsylvania by an impact in Quebec 12,900 years ago.

Traces of platinum deposited on the Greenland ice cap at about the same time. Harvard researchers argue that the platinum probably came from an extraterrestrial object—not a comet, however, but a rare type of iron-rich meteorite.

Spherules in Syria. In their latest paper, some of the original proponents of the impact hypothesis now say it deposited 10 million metric tons of spherules over an area of 20 million square miles, stretching from Syria through Europe to the west coast of North America.

news.nationalgeographic.com...



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 08:53 AM
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Not sure if maybe the fence might not have been used to divert migratory animals like in northern Canada .

Annual Caribou Drive

For their annual caribou drive the Beothuk built fence works along river banks or at lakes to obstruct the migration routes of herds. In fall, large numbers of caribou migrated from the Northern Peninsula southwards across the Exploits River and Red Indian Lake. Once a herd is on the move, the herd stubbornly follows the lead animals. If such leaders can be driven into a fence-trap or towards narrow exits in the fences, the rest of the herd will follow.

In 1768 John Cartwright, who travelled along the Exploits River, described the fences as consisting of felled trees that had been left hanging on the stump; every freshly cut tree was made to fall on the previous one. To make the fences impenetrable, weak spots were filled with branches or were secured by large stakes and bindings. Where there were no trees, the Beothuk drove 2 m sticks into the ground at an angle and tied birchbark strips to the tops. The movement of the bark strips in the wind and the sound of their striking against each other frightened the caribou and kept them from passing between the sticks.
www.heritage.nf.ca... I think I remember also reading about how the plains Indians would use tribe members spread out over many miles to funnel the Buffalo and chase them over a cliff .



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 08:59 AM
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In Old Testament times, the area east of Jordan was settled territory (three of the tribes of Israel) troubled by trbes on the desert side (the Ammonites, the Syrians). If it was old enough, the wall could be related to that kind of situation.



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 02:00 PM
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here is a link to a bit of a bigger one in benin, nigeria.
the fears instilled into these people to go to such lengths for protection, amazes me.



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 05:57 PM
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originally posted by: stinkelbaum
here is a link to a bit of a bigger one in benin, nigeria.
the fears instilled into these people to go to such lengths for protection, amazes me.


Giants would instill that kind of fear, forcing man to come together and build a medium from the monsters.

Or maybe they were trying to keep saskwatch out?

All half-jokes aside, cool find, that wall looks massive.



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
Historically that would have been the Palestinians though.


Dey tuk ur jerbs



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 10:49 PM
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Its just a Rock Pile by Ancient Farmers .. making a Barrier ..
from Other Farmers! 8000 years Ago ...
Move Along !!

Right ?

Or perhaps it was something like a Hadiens Wall ..



posted on Feb, 21 2016 @ 01:49 AM
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a reply to: SLAYER69

Your photo seems to show another parallel wall close by .
A corral for wildlife maybe , or a route marker , added to by
subsequent travellers .?



posted on Feb, 21 2016 @ 05:39 AM
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Trumps ancestors?



posted on Feb, 21 2016 @ 11:53 AM
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originally posted by: skunkape23
They were trying to keep the Mexicans out. They took their jobs.

Exactly. The last gasp of failing empires is to try and keep out the 'enemy'.

In the OP pic, theres even a fort nearby to house the troops that guard the wall. Romans did this in Old England. Then theres the wall around Gaza, the US mexico border, the Iraq/ Saudi border… the wall in Berlin before the Soviet Empire collapsed, countless others. Guess where the failing states are?

Edit: Behind the walls.

Graphic animation, mature subject matter and themes…

edit on 21-2-2016 by intrptr because: Edit: and youtube



posted on Feb, 22 2016 @ 02:20 AM
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originally posted by: the2ofusr1
Not sure if maybe the fence might not have been used to divert migratory animals like in northern Canada .
...
I think I remember also reading about how the plains Indians would use tribe members spread out over many miles to funnel the Buffalo and chase them over a cliff .


Hunting with drives and falls, and it's small game equivalent beaters and nets, were key early strategies for humans. They were among the first ways that allowed for effective cooperation to support populations larger than you could do with basic hunting and gathering, which, iirc, is only something like ~30 hunter gatherers on iirc 10 square miles.

Populations of 100+ could then make effective use of their greater numbers; however, they were probably quite wasteful and may have been the first humans to cause serious ecological changes by killing off megafauna and too many animals in general.

Also, for it to be about funneling migrating animals, you'd need...migrating animals. So you'd need the arid region to not be so arid...it needs to be grassland and have plenty of water. Nature can oblige, if you go back far enough:

When Arabia was green: lush grasslands helped early man make leap out of Africa.

Arabia was once a lush paradise of grass and woodlands.

Early Holocene spread of grasslands in NW Arabia.

If it was part of an early migration route for humans, it was probably so the locals could collect a toll and sell overpriced souvenirs and bottled water, lol.



posted on Feb, 22 2016 @ 05:55 PM
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a reply to: intrptr




originally posted by: skunkape23 They were trying to keep the Mexicans out. They took their jobs.

intrptr
Exactly. The last gasp of failing empires is to try and keep out the 'enemy'.


What is Ironic is ! The Mexicans are Spanish Speaking and Spanish Mix Indians ..
in Which Spaniards are Descendants of Moors that Invaded Spain
and Moors are mostly Arabic / Persian from the Middle East..

So skunkape23 is partially right ! Right?

Just Saying...



posted on Feb, 22 2016 @ 06:12 PM
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originally posted by: Wolfenz
a reply to: intrptr




originally posted by: skunkape23 They were trying to keep the Mexicans out. They took their jobs.

intrptr
Exactly. The last gasp of failing empires is to try and keep out the 'enemy'.


What is Ironic is ! The Mexicans are Spanish Speaking and Spanish Mix Indians ..
in Which Spaniards are Descendants of Moors that Invaded Spain
and Moors are mostly Arabic / Persian from the Middle East..

So skunkape23 is partially right ! Right?

Just Saying...


building Walls must of been fun !

keeping intruders out

my Favorites

Hadrian's Wall
en.wikipedia.org...'s_Wall

Great Wall of China
en.wikipedia.org...

We can Add this to the Wall List
en.wikipedia.org...


Defensive Wall
en.wikipedia.org...

Was this a Defensive WAll or Territorial Barrier of some kind ?

93-Mile-Long Ancient Wall in Jordan Puzzles Archaeologists
by Owen Jarus, Live Science Contributor | February 18, 2016 08:24am ET
www.livescience.com...
edit on 12016MondayfAmerica/Chicago252 by Wolfenz because: #ing GRAMMER!!!!!!! God Dam !!



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