It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

2015 Proves That Our Solar System Is Way More Awesome Than We Realized

page: 1
15
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 04:41 PM
link   
Scientists are releasing information about our Solar System; some of which we already knew and some of which we believed to be true. Some leave me surprised, some I've been preaching here on ATS. Well, read the list and find what's familiar or old news to you.

1. There are blue skies and red ice on the dwarf planet Pluto.

2. We learned a lot about the history and future of Mars. Mars may have rings like Saturn in 20 to 40 million years.

3. Our solar system has a missing planet. A study concludes that there may have been another Gas giant about 4 million yrs. ago that was ejected from the solar system by Jupiter

4. We spotted the most distant object in our solar system. Astronomers announced in November that they spotted what they believe to be the planetoid, dubbed V774104.

5. One of Saturn's moons has a global, sprawling ocean. Scientists believe that Encelladus has an ocean which extends the entire planet underneath its icy crust.

6. Bright spots on Ceres actually could be just salt.

7. Saturn's outer ring is much more massive than we thought. It turns out that the outer ring of Saturn is around 30 percent bigger than previously thought. In fact, according to a study published in June, the ring covers an area of the sky that's 7,000 times larger than Saturn itself.

8. More planets may be hiding out at the edge of our solar system. Two unknown planets larger than Earth may be lurking at the edge of our solar system. That's according to a team of British and Spanish astronomers who based their theory on calculations of our solar system.

Pretty cool.....I think this is a subtle admission of planetX among other things. What says ATS?

www.huffingtonpost.com...




posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 04:47 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

Awesome, love this stuff.

ETA: NM doesn't really say when it was kicked out.
edit on stThu, 31 Dec 2015 16:52:12 -0600America/Chicago1220151280 by Sremmos80 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 04:49 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

Yes. We are good at learning and getting better at it.


I think this is a subtle admission of planetX among other things. What says ATS?
Please define what you mean by planetX. That's sort of too vague to provide an opinion on your thought.

edit on 12/31/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 04:57 PM
link   
a reply to: Sremmos80
Since the title of the actual article is Young Solar System’s Fifth Giant Planet?
It would seem to be on the scale of billions of years.
arxiv.org...

The Solar System was not young 4 million years ago and indeed, the OP's source says 4 billion years.

edit on 12/31/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 05:54 PM
link   
The Universe could be something completely different that what we could ever fathom in our minds, something so far off from what we'd expect.

However if i said what i really thought it was, i'd make a lot of people unhappy and well it's New Years Eve and i don't want to disturb the joy
edit on 12/31/2015 by awareness10 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 05:56 PM
link   
Been waiting to share this video with ATS to see the opinions of others.
Since this topic is on Solar Systems, I figured this would be the best place for it.

Enjoy the video, I personally think it's beautiful and reminds me a lot of Atoms.

"As above, so below" comes to mind.




posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 07:04 PM
link   
Nice thread with some interesting points. We really are just starting to gain a glimpse of what is really out there.

I remember a while back watching a random project camelot interview. I know it is dubious and has been laughed at many a thread. But what got my mind going was a comment from an anonymous person who said we were thinking of space wrong.
We should think of it more like the ocean with biological species which are massive "swimming around".
I know it's stuff of scifi comics but maybe there could be something there.
Transport used by those so far advanced may just be massive biological creations.



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 07:06 PM
link   
a reply to: InMyShell




Transport used by those so far advanced may just be massive biological creations.

Moya is awesome.



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 07:41 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: lostbook

Yes. We are good at learning and getting better at it.


I think this is a subtle admission of planetX among other things. What says ATS?
Please define what you mean by planetX. That's sort of too vague to provide an opinion on your thought.


I hear PlanetX mentioned every now and again here on ATS and I've read some of the debates here of whether it exists or not.

If you think my comparison of a mystery gas giant being ejected by Jupiter was a vague admission of PlanetX then my proposition that the mention of the global ocean on Enceladus is a subtle admission of marine life on that Moon is really "reaching." Eh, Phage?
edit on 31-12-2015 by lostbook because: Word add



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 07:45 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook
No. I asked you to define what you mean by planetX. Because the original Planet X is now called Pluto.
www.space.com...

Are you referring to the mythical Nibiru? A planet which returns to the inner Solar System every 3,600 years? What do you mean by planetX? You asked for comments on your thoughts about it but your thoughts seem to be rather vague.

edit on 12/31/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 07:58 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage

Wow Phage, I didn't know that. I assumed that PlanetX was a giant planet out past the orbit of Pluto.

I suppose it would be Nibiru because the 3600 yr orbit is a telltale feature of the planet in question.

The blue sky and red ice on Pluto is very cool, right?



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 08:40 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

Wow Phage, I didn't know that. I assumed that PlanetX was a giant planet out past the orbit of Pluto.
Which is why I asked you for clarification. There is an awful lot of nonsense about planetX


I suppose it would be Nibiru because the 3600 yr orbit is a telltale feature of the planet in question.
It does? From where did you get that information? From what I've been able to determine, the hypothetical super-Earth is about 250au from the Sun. That doesn't really tell us much but if it has a circular orbit it gives an orbital period of 3,950 years. But no, it can't be Nibiru because the inventor of Nibiru, Sitchin, claimed that Nibiru enters the inner Solar System every 3,600 years.

As far as being a "subtle admission of planetX?" No, it is a hypothesis about trans-Neptunian planets. And it is not the first such hypothesis. More data is needed before the validity of the hypothesis can be determined.
 


The blue sky and red ice on Pluto is very cool, right?
Yes. But I'm disappointed that there was no mention of the Rosetta mission. Also a lot learned there.



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 08:45 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

Could your number 3 not fit in with the extinction of the dinosaurs ?



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 08:52 PM
link   

I suppose it would be Nibiru because the 3600 yr orbit is a telltale feature of the planet in question.
It does? From where did you get that information? From what I've been able to determine, the hypothetical super-Earth is about 250au from the Sun. That doesn't really tell us much but if it has a circular orbit it gives an orbital period of 3,950 years. But no, it can't be Nibiru because the inventor of Nibiru, Sitchin, claimed that Nibiru enters the inner Solar System every 3,600 years.

As far as being a "subtle admission of planetX?" No, it is a hypothesis about trans-Neptunian planets. And it is not the first such hypothesis. More data is needed before the validity of the hypothesis can be determined.
 


The blue sky and red ice on Pluto is very cool, right?
Yes. But I'm disappointed that there was no mention of the Rosetta mission. Also a lot learned there.


I have to admit, I didn't use the scientific process for this one; I got my information in bits and pieces here and there. C'mon Phage, where's your conspiracy spirit? Mankind doesn't know everything....



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 08:57 PM
link   

originally posted by: scubagravy
a reply to: lostbook

Could your number 3 not fit in with the extinction of the dinosaurs ?


Do the timelines coincide between the end of the dinosaurs and the ejection of this mystery planet?

Was their end a sudden event or a number of events over a period of time?
edit on 31-12-2015 by lostbook because: word add



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 09:06 PM
link   
a reply to: scubagravy

Why?



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 09:07 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook



Do the timelines coincide between the end of the dinosaurs and the ejection of this mystery planet?

There were no dinosaurs 4 billion years ago.

Your source:

3. Our solar system has a missing planet.

That's right. Our solar system may have been home to a mysterious world very similar to the four "giant" planets of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune some 4 billion years ago, researchers revealed in August.

www.huffingtonpost.com...


edit on 12/31/2015 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 09:11 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage




There were no dinosaurs 4 billion years ago.


How do you know?!?! You weren't there Phage!



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 09:30 PM
link   

originally posted by: Sremmos80
a reply to: Phage




There were no dinosaurs 4 billion years ago.


How do you know?!?! You weren't there Phage!


Phage is a true scientist at heart; he means no harm.

However Phage, with they way life is recycled through geologic processes, how do we know the true age of Earth?
edit on 31-12-2015 by lostbook because: word add



posted on Dec, 31 2015 @ 09:32 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

Yep.
Mostly harmless.



new topics

top topics



 
15
<<   2 >>

log in

join