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Nasa releases stunning new image of Earth taken from a spacecraft orbiting the moon

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posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 08:34 PM
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originally posted by: EA006
a reply to: RoScoLaz4

They can take a picture of the Earth from the moon that close up....but can't send a decent picture back from Cana.. i mean Mars.
Is it really that difficult to take 1 picture...1 genuine picture in one shot that we could actually buy into?

Not Another Suspicious Aspect

Do you mean pictures of Mars taken from Mars, or do you mean pictures of Earth taken from Mars?

If you mean pictures of Mars from Mars, then 'onebigmonkey' already answered you and provided a link to images form the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). If you mean a picture of Earth from Mars, there are a few from the rovers Curiosity, Spirit, and Opportunity that show the Earth as bright star-like object in the sky...

...but my favorite is this magnified image taken from the Mars Global Surveyor orbiter that shows Earth, Earth's Moon, Jupiter, and some of Jupiter's moons all in the same image (or, more precisely, a mosaic of two images spliced together):

Earth, Moon, and Jupiter, as Seen From Mars -- Malin Space Science Systems



edit on 12/29/2015 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 12:23 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Ah, but you see, the moment you mention that the image has been spliced together / combined / assembled in any way, the conspiracy believers will cry out that the image is not genuine and is, therefore, fake.

Conspiracy believers are fickle like that.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 01:08 AM
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originally posted by: Ove38

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: RoScoLaz4


How do you explain the small Earth in Apollo images ?

www.hq.nasa.gov...

It's NASA. They can't remember the lie they told, when they said they landed on the moon. lmfao

BTW, why is the moon's surface always greyscale? I'm supposed to believe the moon has no color??? Also, the Earth is real bright compared to the moon. How is that possible?

NASA such BS artists!



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 01:12 AM
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a reply to: JuJuBee

Have you ever looked at the moon in a telescope or binoculars? Are you telling me there's more color than light and dark grey? Please point me to the moon coordinates in which you saw color outside of grey on the moon.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 02:07 AM
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originally posted by: JuJuBee

originally posted by: Ove38

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: RoScoLaz4


How do you explain the small Earth in Apollo images ?

www.hq.nasa.gov...

It's NASA. They can't remember the lie they told, when they said they landed on the moon. lmfao


Wrong. Completely wrong.



BTW, why is the moon's surface always greyscale? I'm supposed to believe the moon has no color???


Look up. What colour is it?



Also, the Earth is real bright compared to the moon. How is that possible?


The surface albedo of the Earth is considerably brighter than the moon - strong enough for reflected light to illuminate the dark part. Try searching for 'Earthshine'.



NASA such BS artists!


Well I'm sure they're absolutely devastated to hear you don't like them and will all resign immediately.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 08:14 AM
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originally posted by: JuJuBee

originally posted by: Ove38

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: RoScoLaz4


How do you explain the small Earth in Apollo images ?

www.hq.nasa.gov...

It's NASA. They can't remember the lie they told, when they said they landed on the moon. lmfao

Wrong answer. The right answer is that they used a different lens, with a shorter focal length.


BTW, why is the moon's surface always greyscale? I'm supposed to believe the moon has no color???

The lunar surface has some subtle colours depending on the mineral composition. However, many published images of the Moon are B&W, for whatever reason. You can see a little bit of colour yourself when looking at the Moon through binoculars or telescope.

(Photo of the Moon with increased saturation)



Also, the Earth is real bright compared to the moon. How is that possible?

The Moon is fairly dark, actually. It has an average reflectivity of asphalt or graphite. We only see it looking very bright in the night sky because it's in full sunlight against the dark sky.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 11:07 AM
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originally posted by: JuJuBee

originally posted by: Ove38
How do you explain the small Earth in Apollo images ?

www.hq.nasa.gov...

It's NASA. They can't remember the lie they told, when they said they landed on the moon. lmfao


Different focal lengths has something to do with it. It isn't a conspiracy; it's basic photography -- such as with these two Apollo 11 images taken with lenses with different focal lengths:

Focal Length: 80mm


Focal Length: 250mm


There was also some cropping done with the image in the OP.



BTW, why is the moon's surface always greyscale? I'm supposed to believe the moon has no color???

There are color images from the moon from Apollo that show some hues of color on the moon. In this one from Appolo 17, you can see that the distant hill has a brown tinge:

history.nasa.gov...

And some brownish-reds on the inside wall of this crater:
history.nasa.gov...


Another from Apollo 17, with orange soil:
history.nasa.gov...

However, the greyness of the moon usually overpowers the subtle colors when looking at the overall Moon, such as when you look up at it.



Also, the Earth is real bright compared to the moon. How is that possible?

The Earth is much brighter than the Moon. As mentioned by others, the Moon has the reflectivity of old asphalt. But on a sunny day, even an asphalt car park/parking lot can be a bright place. Even a black object (darker than the moon) at night in a flood-lit area would look bright.

One other thing: The image in the OP was taken from near the terminator line between dark and light on the Moon.



posted on Jan, 1 2016 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: JuJuBee

the dishonesty needed to post a pic that rebutts your own claim is incredible



posted on Jan, 7 2016 @ 01:07 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: MrMasterMinder
If the earth is fully illuminated then why can we see shadows on the moon surface?

Because the spacecraft was getting close to the terminator line.

I drew this rough picture to help people understand where the spacecraft was, and where it was looking, in order to see both the full Earth and the shadows on the Moon:



Back to reality


edit on 7-1-2016 by Ove38 because: text fix



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 03:04 PM
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I can not belive people can not see it?
take a look at all the old pics
of the moon with earth!

this new one has the moon ten times bigger.
the pic was taken from a LONG way off.
so the moon Should be small????
it is far to big. even with zoom!



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: buddha

So if you take a picture of something a long way off, the foreground is going to be tiny?



posted on Jan, 8 2016 @ 03:33 PM
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a reply to: buddha

If you read back through the thread, you'll find that the distance covered by the moon in image has been worked out, is entirely consistent with what you should be able to see, and that you can confirm details of it with photos taken by other probes.




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