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Freudian slip? News Anchor Says the "ACTORS" have been caught instead of suspects.

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posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 10:15 AM
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a reply to: Bloodydagger

that's an interesting catch!
hey, maybe the anchor's a member of ATS lol
wouldn't be the first time I heard something from ATS on the news


haha yeah he probably meant attackers. But it's still really weird. Asktheanimals mentioned what I've been thinking, too, and that's that there's been way too many shootings lately and there must be something up. What that is, I can only guess, but I think that 'crisis actors' are the least of our concerns.




posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 10:15 AM
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What would be the point of including schmarmy news anchors in on a hoax?

Poor choice of words in my opinion.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 10:18 AM
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a reply to: NihilistSanta

I have never heard the phrase "Long Gun" before, and I say that as a European. I take a less "sinister" view than you on this. This sort of thing happens a lot in the UK - someone in the media comes up with a phrase, and suddenly everyone is using it. Sadly, I can't think of any examples right now. I don't see there being any hidden agenda, at least in most cases. I honestly think that some media folk deliberately come up with these phrases, as others do in business and other contexts, solely for the kudos in being the first person to have used it. A "reporter zero", if you will.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 10:56 AM
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originally posted by: raedar
What would be the point of including schmarmy news anchors in on a hoax?

Poor choice of words in my opinion.


The point is, perhaps this news anchor believes in the "Crisis Actor" conspiracy too and had it in the back of his mind before going on air and he slipped up and said "Actors" instead of "Attackers/Suspects", etc. (hence freudian slip)
edit on 4-12-2015 by Bloodydagger because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 10:57 AM
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You know, when this was posted in the BAN thread I asked what the context was and stated there's more than one definition. I never got a response.

Now I see why.




posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 11:14 AM
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a reply to: DupontDeux

That's an excellent observation.
Of all the words they could have used he chose the one with the least negative connotations.
Get ready, they're going to be blaming the victims somehow.
It couldn't possibly be an act inspired by radical Islam.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 11:16 AM
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a reply to: lacrimoniousfinale

They broke out the "long gun" description at Sandy Hook.
It was a police transmission which lead me to doubt it's validity.
Any beat cop would never describe a shotgun as a "long gun".
It's important because you're not in much danger at 100 yds from a shotgun but you would be from a rifle.


edit on 4-12-2015 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 11:25 AM
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a reply to: Bloodydagger

Actors? Poor choice of words.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 11:55 AM
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a reply to: Asktheanimals

I don't like the "Long Gun" term either. Its sounds so antiquated to me. Just say "Rifles", sheesh!



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 11:55 AM
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originally posted by: mekhanics
a reply to: Bloodydagger

Actors? Poor choice of words.


Yes and some of the event certainly looked "staged"



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 11:59 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus


'Actors' is just an synonym for perpetrators.


Yes it's often used here in the same manner, also as a derogatory meaning a poor imitator, all according to the subject matter.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 01:02 PM
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a reply to: Bloodydagger

"Actor" or "actors" is commonly used by law enforcement to refer to suspects, ie "The actor was arrested after fleeing the scene and crashing into a tree". I read a certain law enforcement journal every now and then and they use that word all the time.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 01:16 PM
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originally posted by: trollz
a reply to: Bloodydagger

"Actor" or "actors" is commonly used by law enforcement to refer to suspects, ie "The actor was arrested after fleeing the scene and crashing into a tree". I read a certain law enforcement journal every now and then and they use that word all the time.


A link to the journal perhaps?



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 01:33 PM
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originally posted by: olaru12

originally posted by: trollz
a reply to: Bloodydagger

"Actor" or "actors" is commonly used by law enforcement to refer to suspects, ie "The actor was arrested after fleeing the scene and crashing into a tree". I read a certain law enforcement journal every now and then and they use that word all the time.


A link to the journal perhaps?

It's not online, it's mailed to my house every month. It's a State Police journal that lists various arrests and incidents for the month.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 03:46 PM
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a reply to: trollz

I've never heard that term before, lol. Its always "suspect" or "perp/perpetrator" etc.
edit on 4-12-2015 by Bloodydagger because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 04:05 PM
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originally posted by: Bloodydagger
a reply to: trollz

I've never heard that term before, lol. Its always "suspect" or "perp/perpetrator" etc.

THE NEW JERSEY CODE OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Section 2C:1-14 - Definitions


e."Actor" includes, where relevant, a person guilty of an omission;

They use the same term in PA, it's basically just someone who did something. Here's another link for a PA document in which the word is used several times.
Chapter 39 - Title 18 - CRIMES AND OFFENSES

"Property of another." Includes property in which any person other than the actor has an interest which the actor is not privileged to infringe, regardless of the fact that the actor also has an interest in the property and regardless of the fact that the other person might be precluded from civil recovery because the property was used in an unlawful transaction or was subject to forfeiture as contraband. Property in possession of the actor shall not be deemed property of another who has only a security interest therein, even if legal title is in the creditor pursuant to a conditional sales contract or other security agreement.



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 04:16 PM
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originally posted by: Asktheanimals
a reply to: stargatetravels

Yep.
I hear them calling people attackers quite often on the Emmy awards.
Only natural to confuse the two words.

Btw: There have been 140 some mass shootings under Obama.
There were 14 under Dubya.
Something's not right here.





Because it's left



posted on Dec, 4 2015 @ 10:23 PM
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originally posted by: Bloodydagger
a reply to: trollz

I've never heard that term before, lol. Its always "suspect" or "perp/perpetrator" etc.

That was the old days. Step into the 21st Century where the police have to be PC and those terms may offend someone....




posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 04:29 AM
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Since the word he used fits, nothing really else to say.



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 04:37 AM
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There's nothing unusual about this.

Furthermore, if all this was simulated, the civilian news would be the last people let into the secret.



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