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Lawsuit. Cops murder unarmed teen because of the look in his eye

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posted on Oct, 30 2015 @ 11:06 PM
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I saw a scared cop shoot a kid. And that's bad, but it's not as bad as
an ANGRY cop "asserting" his "ultimate" authority over someone
who doesn't grovel at his feet.

That's what I was expecting to see. That is what I am conditioned
to expect of late.

This shooting was wrong on so many levels, but the dead kid was not
blameless.

The claim in the story that the kid had headphones on and couldn't
hear (or wasn't aware) of the officer is BS. He clearly walks away and
ignores the order to stop. Then he sticks his hands in his pants as he's
turning around, and with the cops pointing guns at him, proceeds to
fumble in his pants instead of simply raising his hands...so he gets
some of the blame.

And I'm afraid in this instance, it will be just enough blame to
keep the cop from getting fired, or the lawsuit from being
successful.




posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 12:16 AM
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I read the entire thread before I watched the video and couldn't understand why this case wasn't all over the media.

Then I watched the video...



That being said, this officer needs to be brought up on charges. At the very least manslaughter.



posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 01:07 AM
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Well, I'm not surprised.

One of the cops in the lawsuit is named Uppsen Downes. That's just...idk.

I too hope they win millions. How this killer wasn't charged is beyond me.

Last time I checked its not illegal to have eyeballs.



posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 01:12 AM
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When I was in High school, a student in my class had a father that was on our local police force. He had come into our school every year to go from class to class just as a healthy reminder to be safe and lawful and so on and so forth.

The main thing I remember out of his talk with our class was that he said he was in the police force for about 15 years or so, and not once did he ever need to use his gun. I don't recall precisely if he said that he even needed to remove it from it's holster.

I found it very interesting, because you see on US news all the time that cops always seem to have their guns drawn, or a suspect already dead. Perhaps that's just the news that's shown. Nevertheless, I found it to be quite a powerful statement.

This, of course, is yet another massive strategy in what seems to be an ever increasing scenario



posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 01:19 AM
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originally posted by: kibbs08
a reply to: alienjuggalo


Does anyone feel safer when they see a cop?



This is a REALLY great question.

I know I don't. I get nervous AF and I have no reason to be, honestly. I don't set out to break the law, I'm just a regular ol person. But, anymore, I do get nervous.

You never know what kind of personality you're going to get if u get pulled over, etc. could be a killer or a professional. But it seems there's more of the former on the force these days.

Sickening.



posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 01:38 AM
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Seriously, quit with the dissemination of information on the platform of "If you look at a cop wrong they'll kill you."

This is a completely individualized event, separate of literally 99.99% of police. I mean, their actions deserve to have them thrown in prison if this is the full story.

But spreading misinformation on the basis of accusing the entire U.S. Police force is just wrong, that's exactly what the media does with most stories, and I see most people on here absolutely despise media tactics. Don't go and do the same thing. You're taking aim at Police, take aim at this officer.

But yeah, this officer needs to be put in prison, and I hope the family is compensated well.

If I were to do the same thing in the basis of what some non-authorities do, I could say the same about anyone. Even you. But I won't, because you're an individual separate of those incidents, as are 99.99% of people.



posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 01:42 AM
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Lol

"GET EM OOOOUT *BOOM BOOM*".

The cop didn't even finish his sentence.

Also, why was the cop asking him to get his hands out, if he shot him when he got his hands out?

The cop commanded him. The guy did as the cop said (though slightly late, maybe due to headphones), but the cop shot him anyway.
edit on 31-10-2015 by Kuroodo because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 01:47 AM
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originally posted by: Interstellardove
This is a completely individualized event, separate of literally 99.99% of police.


You've only been on ATS for a very short while. I can assure you that 99.99% is quite drastically inaccurate. This exact same event can be seen over and over again in what seems to be a weekly basis in ATS.



posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 02:05 AM
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a reply to: odzeandennz

You said it. They are cowards and it's not their actions that get them bravery awards. It's the bell curve. They have to be shown to be heroic or it all falls apart, despite the rest of society that perform heroic actions and do not get the blue belt award for being stupid enough to engage in a job that scares their pants off.

it's like giving a doctor who has a fear of blood, the award for botching surgery. or a fireman who is afraid of fire an award because he runs away.



posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 02:14 AM
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originally posted by: Ghost147

originally posted by: Interstellardove
This is a completely individualized event, separate of literally 99.99% of police.


You've only been on ATS for a very short while. I can assure you that 99.99% is quite drastically inaccurate. This exact same event can be seen over and over again in what seems to be a weekly basis in ATS.


My being on ATS has nothing to do with statistics, though I have been visiting this site since I was a young teenager. Merely to read the intriguing posts you can find here.

And you're probably right, but I highly doubt the number of cops who shoot someone based on the look in their eye is very high in comparison to the over 1.1 million police in the U.S.

That also doesn't change my other point, dissemination of information in a way that puts a spin on it and attempts to attribute a characteristic of few to many is exactly what I've seen people on this site fight against for nearly a decade. We want information and we want the right information, but how is being critical of everything around you but not yourself any different than what the media does, or what the general population does, or many of our political leaders?

I'm unsure of your point, are you trying to discredit my view based off of my time here? I only bring an observation to the table, a fairly intriguing one when you consider the nature of the ATS community.

We criticize police as a whole, but we don't apply that standard to ourselves? That's never going to lead to the truth. I could call you all murderers on that basis. Other people did it, so why not you, or me?

Maybe we should attempt to figure out the actual statistic before saying something like this.

Even if a cop did shoot someone based off the look in their eye on a weekly basis that's still only 0.0052% of all police. That's just not a high enough number to point a finger at all police.
edit on 31-10-2015 by Interstellardove because: Content addition



posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 02:40 AM
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a reply to: Interstellardove

I am sure the majority of police are outstanding citizens otherwise, and I agree, suggesting that all police are like this is an outlandish claim. However, whenever an incident like this does occur, we often see very minor slap-on-the-wrist treatment for the officers involved, then back on the streets as police officers they go.

We also have things popping up now and then like police forces attempting to shut down phone services in specific areas, or going to bystanders, taking their phones/cameras, and removing any video/photo evidence of the things they are doing. Bullying when they don't realize there are security cameras on. Rejecting mandatory head-cams for all officers. so on and so forth.

The scale seems to be growing.



posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 05:49 AM
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a reply to: Urantia1111

My good lady...I beg to differ with you as gun crime is at all time high in the UK therefore most of the police are very unsure as to whether a weapon is present or not.


www.mirror.co.uk...



posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 05:53 AM
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Yet another example of failure to comply justifying the use of lethal force in the US.

Judging by the officers response, he must be borderline retarded... I can imagine what his written reports look like. There used to be strict IQ quotas to become a police officer that have been severely lax in recent times to get # heads like this on the force who will follow any order given to them.
edit on 31-10-2015 by Konduit because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 07:35 AM
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originally posted by: Urantia1111
a reply to: alienjuggalo

Nah, this has already been posted. The kid absolutely saw the cops pull up, ducked out the opposite direction, pretended briefly to be unaware of them, then when facing the officer with gun drawn on him, further sealed his own fate by not stopping and getting his hands up as ordered. These actions will very reliably get you shot and everybody knows it.


Gotta love when the other side demonstrates how broken our system is to anyone who's not a maniac. 'You do everything a cop says or you get killed, everyone knows that.' LOL. Sad.



posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 08:12 AM
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originally posted by: charolais
a reply to: FraggleRock

The biggest thing that stood out to me was how the first thing the other officer asks the shooter officer is if his camera was on. Then when he says yes, the other officer reassures him that he saw the man reaching. This screams premeditation and covering of their bases first thing instead of trying to help the man.


I hope the family makes out well in the lawsuit.


This is not uncommon (minus the shooting). I've seen a few cases where cops start shouting conflicting or confusing orders and wind up getting all amped up because the person isn't "complying" no matter what they try.

Just the other day, I go pulled over with a car behind me. Apparently he wanted the car behind and pointed at me as he walked up. I wasn't about to drive off with him pointing at me (pretty ambiguous), but he just kept getting angrier.

Finally I rolled down the window and he made a clearer waving motion and said "Go!" all agitated. That was just a traffic stop. Imagine something more serious.



posted on Oct, 31 2015 @ 01:43 PM
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originally posted by: Ghost147
a reply to: Interstellardove

I am sure the majority of police are outstanding citizens otherwise, and I agree, suggesting that all police are like this is an outlandish claim. However, whenever an incident like this does occur, we often see very minor slap-on-the-wrist treatment for the officers involved, then back on the streets as police officers they go.

We also have things popping up now and then like police forces attempting to shut down phone services in specific areas, or going to bystanders, taking their phones/cameras, and removing any video/photo evidence of the things they are doing. Bullying when they don't realize there are security cameras on. Rejecting mandatory head-cams for all officers. so on and so forth.

The scale seems to be growing.


I can get on board with that. It definitely seems like there's an up trend, I did see above that you mentioned it could just be over exposure of those events, which is also a thought in my mind. We tend to latch onto trends, the media over exposes something and the public jumps onto it. The problem is, this is right at home. This could have consequences. Major ones, especially if we're wrong.

Which is why I want to see numbers... I'm sure there's a way. Maybe I'll try later, cite sources for my statistics, and try to gauge the change in number of events against the rise of population for a number of decades.

For me, it would make the picture clearer at least. I mean what's people's plan? What do they want? They can't possibly just not want a police force, granted I'm sure anarchists would disagree. But if they are asking for change in something where the actual numbers have remained fairly static, then we're asking for perfection. Which is okay, but not worthy of unnecessary actions against police.

Again with the overall declining view of police, I have to wonder how our declining view actually effects the police. Is it causing more problems? For instance, we push back because of views being distorted by the media, and then the police are effected, causing a push back by them?

For instance, the black student, people are in outrage. Yet every method to remove her peacefully was attempted before hand. Granted the officer may have tugged on her harder than he should have, did we as a population generalizing police spark a bit of inner rage when he was struck? Did he feel overwhelmed? After all he had no choice but to remove her forcefully on some level, that's how authority works. If they don't enforce authority then authority sort of ceases to exist. It loses its foundation, it's point. Though officers need to maintain control of themselves, as well as the situation.

This is what I mean by being just as critical of ourselves as the subjects of our criticism, especially when it's so harsh. Granted, I have a habit of playing devil's advocate until I can see every angle as clearly as possible.

Declining views of police could be serious long term, maybe it'll be another trend to fade into the background.




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