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Gluten-Free Foods and Recipes

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posted on Aug, 20 2015 @ 11:26 PM
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a reply to: woodsmom

Buckwheat. Has nothing to do with wheat, as you know. I love noodles. Many nations us buckwheat to make their noodles. You can get it almost anywhere. I have to get the flour from the U.S. mmmmmmmmmmmmm. Noooooooooooooodles. How to make juwari soba noodles.




posted on Aug, 20 2015 @ 11:59 PM
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a reply to: argentus

It's got a nice flavor to it too. Now that you mention it, we did find an all buckwheat pasta in the next town over that held up nicely. Thanks for the recipe, and the reminder of the pasta!

It's surprising how easy it is to shed certain things from your diet in general. I was a major bread and pasta person my whole life until about a year after I was diagnosed. Then when my son was diagnosed even the GF breads were off limits. It has truly forced us into a very fresh down to earth healthy diet. It has been simpler too since we stop trying to substitute things that just don't always translate. I have come to love basmati rice though. It's one luxury that we keep on hand.



posted on Aug, 31 2015 @ 06:16 PM
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Pancakes!!!!

We had pancakes for dinner the other night.
As I am new to GF....I got a bag of Bob's Red Mill GF pancake mix to try.

Following direction....it needed quite a bit more liquid...at least a 1/4 cup more.
But they were delicious....better than plain old flour pancakes....
Although a bit salty for my taste.

When this bag is gone, I'm getting Pamela's Pancake mix to try.
Less salt if nothing else....and different ingredients.



posted on Sep, 5 2015 @ 10:59 PM
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a reply to: woodsmom

I can make pasta -- of a sort -- out of homemade coconut flour. I make coconut oil, and the copra that is left over can be ground into flour. It's a somewhat messy process. I also am reminded of brown rice flour, which I use for thickening sauces.



posted on Sep, 6 2015 @ 09:41 AM
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a reply to: argentus

Seriously, though.....how hard is the noodle to make.....they sound so good, but I'm not a huge fan of working with dough that need to be rolled out....
I want to try it on a day I am craving carbs...LOL

I'm also wondering what would happen if I tried to add 1/2 GF baking mix to the recipe in place of the flour???
I read the article and their comments on using 100% buckwheat flour...and it sound pretty darn risky.



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 06:15 PM
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Soooooooooooo, lately we've gotten into Kimchi. Always have liked sauerkraut; Kimchi is a flavorful cut above that and to my way of thinking, much more versatile in various menus. Tonight we had pork tenderloin, marinated for several hours in honey, soy sauce, ginger and sesame oil. Canola oil in the pan, and when it's just barely smoking, grilled the pork, cut into 3/4" rounds. Set aside to keep warm. Added two cloves of garlic, more ginger, about 1/2 cup of scallions, cut up bok choy and about a cup of kimchi and a tablespoon of garlic chili sauce. Added the pork back in and took it off as soon as the bok choy was wilted. Served over and around brown rice cooked with coconut milk, seasoning peppers (a mild pepper) and red beans.

No gluten, no cry.


ETA: tomorrow --- egg foo yung with kimchi.
edit on 7/9/15 by argentus because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 7 2015 @ 06:18 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

buckwheat noodles are the standard in many Asian countries. They are not nearly as flexible as wheat noodles (damn you gluten!!!), but manageable. It's sort of an art form, and something worth working on, if you're a noodleist.

You can add flaxseed meal to some GF flours and get them to rise.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 04:30 AM
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a reply to: argentus

I love kimchi too. In fact at the moment I am selling kimchi and sauerkraut at a farmers market. My friends make it.
Peanut butter cheese and kimchi on toast.yum.

Just make sure you get wheat free soya sauce. Ad be aware most Comercial rice vinegar used at sushi shops contain wheat therefore gluten



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 02:07 PM
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a reply to: Cloudbuster

Good information -- I didn't know that about rice vinegar
In general, I like to cook with whatever is fit to drink.

Tell me about peanut butter cheese? Sounds scary and wonderful at the same time. ;o)



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

Gluten free is a fad. Study has shown that people who "think" they have allergies can't tell the difference between food with gluten or not. It's psychosomatic and there is no verifiable evidence that gluten even does anything. It's all in the head.


This new research has captivated the press as it has been manipulated to send a message that in reality, gluten sensitivity doesn’t actually exist, and that the reactions people may have to consuming gluten containing products may well have to do with other components of the foods called FODMAPS – a group of poorly absorbed carbohydrates.



He began by revealing to the radio audience that his earlier research had clearly recognized gluten exposure as a risk for illness in some humans. But he went on to say that now, his newer research showed contradictory results. “Unless a person has celiac disease, there is no reason to avoid consuming gluten.

www.drperlmutter.com...


The subjects cycled through high-gluten, low-gluten, and no-gluten (placebo) diets, without knowing which diet plan they were on at any given time. In the end, all of the treatment diets - even the placebo diet - caused pain, bloating, nausea, and gas to a similar degree. It didn’t matter if the diet contained gluten. (Read more about the study.)

www.sciencealert.com...

Got celiac disease? Probably not.

Abstract

Background: Nonceliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), occurring in patients without celiac disease yet whose gastrointestinal symptoms improve on a gluten-free diet (GFD), is largely a self-reported diagnosis and would appear to be very common. The aims of this study were to characterize patients who believe they have NCGS. Materials and Methods: Advertising was directed toward adults who believed they had NCGS and were willing to participate in a clinical trial. Respondents were asked to complete a questionnaire about symptoms, diet, and celiac investigation. Results: Of 248 respondents, 147 completed the survey. Mean age was 43.5 years, and 130 were women. Seventy-two percent did not meet the description of NCGS due to inadequate exclusion of celiac disease (62%), uncontrolled symptoms despite gluten restriction (24%), and not following a GFD (27%), alone or in combination. The GFD was self-initiated in 44% of respondents; in other respondents it was prescribed by alternative health professionals (21%), dietitians (19%), and general practitioners (16%). No celiac investigations had been performed in 15% of respondents. Of 75 respondents who had duodenal biopsies, 29% had no or inadequate gluten intake at the time of endoscopy. Inadequate celiac investigation was common if the GFD was initiated by self (69%), alternative health professionals (70%), general practitioners (46%), or dietitians (43%). In 40 respondents who fulfilled the criteria for NCGS, their knowledge of and adherence to the GFD were excellent, and 65% identified other food intolerances. Conclusions: Just over 1 in 4 respondents self-reporting as NCGS fulfill criteria for its diagnosis. Initiation of a GFD without adequate exclusion of celiac disease is common. In 1 of 4 respondents, symptoms are poorly controlled despite gluten avoidance.

ncp.sagepub.com...

There's nothing wrong with wheat.
edit on 8-9-2015 by FlySolo because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: argentus

I think if you look at the ingrediants on bottles of rice vinegar you will find one with just rice and no wheat in the ingrediants but the commercial one that sushi shops use has wheat in it.

Oh and I meant to say peanut butter and cheese,I'm just a bit lazy on commas.. I have seen a peanut butter brand with wheat in it . I think it was an American brand. Just read all ingrediants on everything all the time as companies often change their recipes.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 02:47 PM
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a reply to: FlySolo

All I know is that even if I have the tiniest bit of gluten my face get itchy and red within about an hour of eating it and I get a headache that lasts three days. My joints swell up . Then my skin on my face gets blisters. After being tested as severely malnourished and dangerously low in iron and all other bits and minerals and with my skin reaction a and constant thrush which is a yeast thing done below and constant aching joints aND servere depression a friend suggest I try gluten free so I did and all these symptoms disappear.
Don't tell me I am not allergic to gluten.
Sure there are people who are fad-ding it but it is real to some people.
edit on 8-9-2015 by Cloudbuster because: Added some extra words. So what.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 03:01 PM
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originally posted by: Cloudbuster
a reply to: FlySolo

All I know is that even if I have the tiniest bit of gluten my face get itchy and red within about an hour of eating it and I get a headache that lasts three days. My joints swell up . Then my skin on my face gets blisters. After being tested as severely malnourished and dangerously low in iron and all other bits and minerals and with my skin reaction a and constant thrush which is a yeast thing done below and constant aching joints aND servere depression a friend suggest I try gluten free so I did and all these symptoms disappear.
Don't tell me I am not allergic to gluten.
Sure there are people who are fad-ding it but it is real to some people.


Right. And what else did you change in your diet?



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 03:15 PM
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a reply to: FlySolo

Nothing else has changed in my diet except avoiding gluten as much as I possibly can. Even eating hot chips from fish and chip shop cause a reaction as fried in same oil as battered fish.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 03:21 PM
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a reply to: Cloudbuster

Then maybe you have celiac disease. Truth is, 4 out of 5 self diagnosed people can't tell if gluten is in their food. What does that tell you? One person may have celiac disease and the other four are hypochondriacs. i've worked with people who claim to have been allergic to the glue we used in motor coach construction. It was a water based glue that kids use in kindergarten.

Anyway, I'm just pointing out that this study shows that most people on the gluten free bandwagon don't know what they're talking about.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 03:26 PM
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a reply to: FlySolo

I'm not sure if I have celiac as I don't have 350$ or more to pay for intestine biopsy and am not willing to eat gluten for period of time before biopsy. All I know is I'm better off without it. I know people who do the fad thing to loose weight but not me. Although I did happen to loose weight when I went gluten free. It's been 14 years of gluten free for me.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 03:32 PM
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a reply to: Cloudbuster

Fine, I don't know you or your medical history. But the OP is jumping on the bandwagon because someone told her to. I'm just here to point out the facts. There's nothing wrong with wheat. It's what made civilization. So to demonize wheat because of other disorders is just kooky. Not saying you are, just the whole anti-gluten thing is another marketing trap for the gullible consumer.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 04:22 PM
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a reply to: FlySolo

Actually you will find that the wheat that is produced today has been selectively grown to contain way more gluten in it than was grown 50 years ago and that is causing problems. And the fact that people are eating more gluten based foods in their diet which is easy and convenient not to mention that wheat is used as a filler to bulk out products like ground spices for example.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 05:47 PM
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a reply to: Cloudbuster




Actually you will find that the wheat that is produced today has been selectively grown to contain way more gluten in it than was grown 50 years ago and that is causing problems.


Well, a quick search tells me that this is false. Wheat has not increased in gluten at all, but the processed foods we eat pretty much all contain 3x more. As well, farmers are the most vocal about GMO wheat because they export overseas. Corn? yes Canola? yes. Wheat? No. It's the processed foods we're eating.



posted on Sep, 8 2015 @ 05:55 PM
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Peaches and Plums of course.



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