It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Can you solve the code in the sword?

page: 1
2

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 8 2015 @ 12:51 PM
link   



A medieval sword that carries a mysterious inscription has baffled historians for centuries. Little is known about double-edged weapon, least of all the meaning behind a cryptic 18-letter message running down the central groove which reads: NDXOXCHWDRGHDXORVI. Now The British Library have appealed for the public’s help in cracking the conundrum.


link

So im a student of Theology, History, Linguistics, Alchemy and Astronomy.

For me this wasnt very hard, i found the missing pieces. But when the inscription is bad, and cursed. Do/should you tell what it says, or would it be better of never knowing.




posted on Aug, 8 2015 @ 01:03 PM
link   
Those who know don't say, just sayin.



posted on Aug, 8 2015 @ 01:05 PM
link   
That inscription looks a lot fresher than the rest of the blade, just saying…



posted on Aug, 8 2015 @ 01:09 PM
link   
It says "be sure to drink your Ovaltine".


edit on 8-8-2015 by TzarChasm because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 8 2015 @ 01:14 PM
link   
a reply to: yulka
This has to be a joke, right?

The British Library does know what this means, and I think they are just trying to drum up attendees. (it means "Holy Slayer of Dragons") I mean it's not they found Excalibur or anything special. It's just a brand mark of a Sword-Smith, kind of like the Viking Sword that's stamped "Ulfberht".



posted on Aug, 8 2015 @ 01:16 PM
link   
a reply to: Guyfriday

Link please =)

What i got out of the scripture was something very different.
edit on 8-8-2015 by yulka because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 8 2015 @ 01:22 PM
link   
a reply to: yulka

Sorry Yulka.

It's already been posted here.

Please add to the existing thread.

Closed



posted on Aug, 8 2015 @ 01:28 PM
link   
a reply to: yulka
No link, I saw something very similar to this on a sword while visiting a friend in wales. I asked the curator of the museum what it meant. I thought it was something special like a magical stamping or something, but no the curator told me that it just meant "Holy Slayer of Dragons". It used to be a big thing to have special markings on a sword, and so a few Sword-Smiths would spend the extra time making these marks (most of the time it was just a stamping, but the more costly blades had words and symbols forged into them).



posted on Aug, 21 2015 @ 10:16 AM
link   
a reply to: yulka


Take care sharp edges !



posted on Oct, 20 2015 @ 08:15 AM
link   
So has nobody cracked this yet? I've been through the posts but couldn't find a solution. So I had a quick look and knocked this up.

Here it is:


There are nine pairs of letters. They are coordinates. I used the standard alphabet. I suspect we have letters now they didn't have then but it doesn't make that much difference. So you plot the points starting from the right and moving left and that's it. You're done. Five of the points are outer planets, four are inner. You have to divide them across two graphs to get a clearer picture. The positions of the planets are unique to a particular date. In this case 28 November 2015.



posted on Dec, 22 2015 @ 04:41 PM
link   

originally posted by: yulka



A medieval sword that carries a mysterious inscription has baffled historians for centuries. Little is known about double-edged weapon, least of all the meaning behind a cryptic 18-letter message running down the central groove which reads: NDXOXCHWDRGHDXORVI. Now The British Library have appealed for the public’s help in cracking the conundrum.


link

So im a student of Theology, History, Linguistics, Alchemy and Astronomy.

For me this wasnt very hard, i found the missing pieces. But when the inscription is bad, and cursed. Do/should you tell what it says, or would it be better of never knowing.
so you don't know then



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 11:14 AM
link   
a reply to: yulka

I personally believe that this sword doesn't contain any real meaning in the symbols on it. It appears like more of a spiritual sort of engraving that both serves to give whoever wields it a deeper mental prep for a swordfight and confuse his opponent with gibbering nonsense as sort of a small distraction. Unable to read the writing on the sword, a part of the enemies' attention would be shifted off the battle itself and onto this distraction. However small that shift would be, even ever so slightly, can mean all the difference in a to-the-death duel. That's what I think. It has no actual meaning and there is no message behind it. Ornamentation.



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 11:50 AM
link   
a reply to: yulka

It's all likelihood it is a set of medieval age emojis....and I'm only kinda joking...

Our humanity has, in all epochs, have had symbology unique to populations and regions...while most see Sumerian cuneiform or Egyptian hieroglyphs as monolithic(pun intended) in their conformity, they are actually widely varying...
Regionally and person to person we saw, as we do today what can only be described as dialects in those ancient "drawings"...

So it can be extrapolated that it is human nature to "personalize" communicae based on your own sensibilities...
So if you were a Viking descendant culture torn between Jesus, celts and Odin then a group could easily develop their own "interpretation" of culture, language and writing based on a generation or two of profound dogma compounded with isolation....

Now to answer your op, I have no clue what it says or if it was etched yesterday or Jan 1st, 1016....
But if authentic(archaic) then we can guess it had some religious significance as that seems to be an intrinsic part of human cultures the world over...

But it is not necessarily religious....

I can see some future civilization wondering why the heck a slutty cartoon girl in stockings is drawn on bombs and bombers at the bottom of the pacific....and what is a "Betty Boop"....anyhow, u get the point

-Christosterone
edit on 28-12-2015 by Christosterone because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
2

log in

join