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'Impossible' rocket drive works and could get to Moon in four hours

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posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 09:26 AM
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This is why when people claim things are IMPOSSIBLE TODAY it might not be IMPOSSIBLE TOMORROW.

The British designed EM Drive actually works and would dramatically speed up space travel, scientists have confirmed


Interplanetary travel could be a step closer after scientists confirmed that an electromagnetic propulsion drive, which is fast enough to get to the Moon in four hours, actually works.

The EM Drive was developed by the British inventor Roger Shawyer nearly 15 years ago but was ridiculed at the time as being scientifically impossible.

It produces thrust by using solar power to generate multiple microwaves that move back and forth in an enclosed chamber. This means that until something fails or wears down, theoretically the engine could keep running forever without the need for rocket fuel.

The drive, which has been likened to Star Trek’s Impulse Drive, has left scientists scratching their heads because it defies one of the fundamental concepts of physics – the conservation of momentum – which states that if something is propelled forward, something must be pushed in the opposite direction. So the forces inside the chamber should cancel each other out.

However in recent years Nasa has confirmed that they believe it works and this week Martin Tajmar, a professor and chair for Space Systems at Dresden University of Technology in Germany also showed that it produces thrust.

The drive is capable of producing thrust several thousand times greater than even a photon rocket and could get to Mars within 70 days or Pluto within 18 months. A trip to Alpha Centauri, which would take tens of thousands of years to reach right now, could be reached in just 100 years.

"Our test campaign cannot confirm or refute the claims of the EM Drive but intends to independently assess possible side-effects in the measurements methods used so far," said Prof Tajmar.

"Nevertheless, we do observe thrust close to the actual predictions after eliminating many possible error sources that should warrant further investigation into the phenomena."


www.telegraph.co.uk...

Like I said, declarations that this or that is impossible makes no sense especially when we're basically primitive when it comes to our understanding of the universe, life and technology. We're what Kaku called a type 0 civilization transitioning to a type 1 civilization.

So when you have discoveries like Kepler 452b, Scientist like Hawking saying Aliens ALMOST CERTAINLY EXIST based on the available evidence and now faster space travel is looking more like a reality, the question as to how can they travel vast distances of space might be a question left to the dustbins of skepticism in tomorrow.


edit on 29-7-2015 by neoholographic because: (no reason given)



+4 more 
posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 09:39 AM
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a reply to: neoholographic

Just about to read through all of this now, but it reminds me of something I said in a couple of other threads regarding the New Horizons mission to Pluto and the NASA announcement about the discovery of Earth 2.0

Along with all the scientifically illiterate posters being desperately depressing in their cynicism of all discovery, someone mentioned that it was "pointless" to investigate other worlds, because we'll never get there.

I of course mentioned that we got a probe to Pluto, and at one point it took weeks to cross the Atlantic.

It's only a matter of time before the prospect of a new Earth-like world to explore pushes scientific development forward in leaps and bounds.

This method of propulsion would do amazing things for space exploration.

When even NASA is showing support and offering theories on how it works (rather than instantly rejecting the notion) you know there's some real credibility behind this.

It's not some crackpot in his garage making YouTube videos with hidden wires under a desk claiming he's invented a method of producing abundant totally free clean energy.

I give it ten years before NASA is using this to send probes to distant worlds, twenty years before we're developing a large ship in orbit to take Scientists on a sight-seeing tour



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 09:47 AM
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Oooer...

Hoping with 4 hours getting to the moon that the first vessels will not be manned???

Just a quick calculation here : If the average distance from the Earth to the moon is around 384,403 km (semi-major axis)

Then that means that the speed for travelling would be roughly 96,000 km per hour.... Thats a hell of a lot of G force?

creation.com...

But then again, maybe I am wrong?

Plus, I am wondering how the craft would actually land without crashing flying at those speeds?



Kindest respects

Nibs

a reply to: neoholographic


edit on 29-7-2015 by Nibbles because: Crap spelling



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 09:55 AM
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a reply to: Nibbles

As I understand it, g-forces would be the same in space as on the Earth, because it's about movement and mass rather than gravity. Something being thrust forward in space still creates the same reverse force.

However, we're not using thrust to send any probe anywhere once it's out of the Earth's atmosphere. It's effectively falling through space, not being thrust through space.

So, the thrust we could create could be both safe with regard to g-forces, and give us high-speed travel to reach these places far more quickly than we would currently without using any thrust.

I think that's how it all works, but I could be wrong.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: Nibbles

Probably by decelerating for landing.

But i do certainly wonder about the G forces as well. Soon it will be irrelevant how fast of engine drives we can make because first we need something which somehow isolates the crew from these forces.
edit on 29-7-2015 by lightedhype because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 09:59 AM
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LOL, I am afraid you don't understand. it's not called an "idea of physics" it's a freaking LAW. You don't break the law.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: Nibbles

Do you even get g-forces in a vacuum?

Eta: Seriously though. When people are in orbit they are travelling 17k or 27k, I forget the speed but it's mega fast. Are they feeling the Gees? I think not. Speed in space is irrelevant when there is no gravity as far as I know.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.
edit on 29-7-2015 by Wide-Eyes because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 10:00 AM
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originally posted by: lightedhype
a reply to: Nibbles

Probably by decelerating.


Taken from the link I posted :

On an interstellar flight, that is probably not a problem. The problem is if the craft needs to stop suddenly to avoid a crash. Stopping would likewise take over 4½ days, at what is almost certainly a very damaging g-force sustained for so long.

Kindest respects

Nibs

Ps. Our resident expert Phage will be along shortly methinks to enlighten us all (I hope?)
edit on 29-7-2015 by Nibbles because: Ps added



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 10:04 AM
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Mars in 70 days, Alpha in 100 years - Those details just blew my mind and I don't think I'll recover.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 10:09 AM
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a reply to: Nibbles

The Space Shuttle could top 17,500 Mph and it would achieve that speed in less than 10 minutes from launch - people survived, so assuming you kept the same level of acceleration as the shuttle, it would probably take around an hour to get to 96,000 mph.

Once you stop accelerating, the g-forces cease (in space, anyway)

I don't see any issue with accelerating to 96,000,000 Km/h and decelerating the other end within the space of a few hours. To make it more comfortable for the passengers, you might want to slow the acceleration/deceleration a bit and add more flight time on, but it's not going to kill you.

Humans can survive very short bursts of up to 100G, although more comfortably it should be less than 15G's for any length of time.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 10:11 AM
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originally posted by: Wide-Eyes
a reply to: Nibbles

Do you even get g-forces in a vacuum?


Of course you do...



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 10:14 AM
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Ia reply to: stumason

I respect your opinions stu but are you sure about that?



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: Rocker2013

G-forces would still apply and the amount would depend on the thrust being produced, the same as it would with a rocket.

So, assuming the same amount of thrust as the Space Shuttle, for arguments sake, you'd be looking at around 3- 4g's while the engines are on.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: Wide-Eyes

100%, absolutely, without equivocation or even a shadow of a doubt

EDIT: To clarify, being in a vacuum has nothing to do with gravity. G forces apply as they would anywhere else when an object is under acceleration (or deceleration) in space. Once the engines are off, then the G-forces would cease.
edit on 29/7/15 by stumason because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 10:18 AM
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originally posted by: angryhulk
Mars in 70 days, Alpha in 100 years - Those details just blew my mind and I don't think I'll recover.


From what I understand, if they are sharing it with us, it is just part of the transition.

What they really have and are capable of, I don't believe we will ever truly know.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 10:28 AM
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originally posted by: Wide-Eyes
a reply to: Nibbles

Do you even get g-forces in a vacuum?

Eta: Seriously though. When people are in orbit they are travelling 17k or 27k, I forget the speed but it's mega fast. Are they feeling the Gees? I think not. Speed in space is irrelevant when there is no gravity as far as I know.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.


Lol wow, you think the presence of atmosphere causes mass?

No, every object has mass, so if I want to accelerate it, the same amount of force I put into it, pushes back in the opposite direction.

What happens if you try to push a car on ice?

Your feet slide back.

Because when you push the car, it's mass pushes back equally.

Atmosphere or no, this is always true.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 10:28 AM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

Keep dreaming. If we had interstellar technology then we would be using it.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 10:29 AM
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a reply to: johnwick

I'm just trying to learn here Bro.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 10:36 AM
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a reply to: johnwick

Everything is relative.

In an enclosed space like an airplane for example.

If you throw a ball inside the plane. The speed of the ball is not affected by how fast you're flying.

You feel acceleration but once you're up to cruising speed you can enjoy a nice whiskey.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 10:37 AM
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a reply to: Wide-Eyes

Unless it was a black project.

Which I don't doubt we do have.




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