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Man Discovers ‘Mutant Daisies’ Growing At Fukushima Nuclear Plant

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+15 more 
posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 06:22 AM
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Bear with me as this is my first post on ATS. I did a search and could not find any mention of this; it popped up on my Google News aggregator. Pretty strange!

Man Discovers 'Mutant Daisies' Growing at Fukushima Nuclear Plant


A discovery of ‘mutant daisies’ has been made near the site of the Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan.

Twitter user San Kaido posted the pictures of the flowers, that appear to show stems and flowers connected to each other.

Others appear slightly deformed, and have prompted fears that radiation is affecting the area.

San Kaido wrote alongside the picture: “The right one grew up, split into 2 stems to have 2 flowers connected to each other, having 4 stems of flower tied belt-like.

“The left one has 4 stems grew up to be tied to each other and it had the ring-shaped flower.






posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 06:24 AM
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a reply to: oriondc

Oh wow, LOL!! No problem with radiation there is it?


+23 more 
posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 06:26 AM
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I have seen those in the United States many times. If you do an image search for double headed daisies it returns many non-Fukishima results. Not saying that the ones in the Original Post are not irradiated but I am not saying they are either.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 06:34 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

I remember the fibbonacci sequence in nature, and this isnt it =)



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 06:35 AM
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a reply to: oriondc

Many of us as kids and young adults have looked closely at our lawns for misshapen "four-leaf" clovers as lucky charms. And how many gardeners have found interesting and misshapen tomatoes, carrots, etc. in their plots? It is the incidence of mutation that is the key point in this area, not isolated specimens. Let us get proper scientific studies of indications of mutations. --But that doesn't seem like it is happening. It is the same story as the UFO sage now dragging on for over half a century. TPTB don't want us to know the truth, better to keep you ignorant to those things that you cannot personally change.

That said from my perspective, man-manipulated, "peaceful" nukes will probably be the death of us all.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 06:41 AM
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a reply to: Aliensun

if you find misshapened tomatoes, or anything id be worried about my soil .



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 06:43 AM
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And here I am wanting this scene to take place:



So. About those turtles...




+43 more 
posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 06:45 AM
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originally posted by: wacco
if you find misshapened tomatoes, or anything id be worried about my soil .


I grow heirloom tomatoes every year and the majority are misshapen.


It is the store-bought, perfectly shaped specimens that should really concern you.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 06:52 AM
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a reply to: oriondc

0.5 μSv/hr is only just above normal background levels..



The mutation is called FASCIATION


edit on 23/7/15 by Chadwickus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 06:54 AM
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Fasciation.

CLICK ME
CLICK ME 2




So exactly what is fasciation in flowers anyway? Fasciation literally means banded or bundled. Scientists aren’t sure what causes the deformity, but they believe it is probably caused by a hormonal imbalance. This imbalance may be the result of a random mutation, or it can be caused by insects, diseases or physical injury to the plant. Think of it as a random occurrence. It doesn’t spread to other plants or other parts of the same plant.


edit on 23-7-2015 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)

edit on 23-7-2015 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)


+6 more 
posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 06:58 AM
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Surprised by the replies. I take it the 1000% increase in thyroid cancer is normal and unrelated to a near nuclear melt down too.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 06:59 AM
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a reply to: oriondc

Looks like plenty of others got there before me.

Variation in nature is common, and it seems someone has simply mistaken something already known about to be something related to Fukushima.

Sadly, I fully expect this to now be woven into the paranoia about what's happening there, regardless of scientific reality.

Just wait, in another three months someone else will come along adding this story and linking back to InfoWars, then claim that it's a "cover up" and we're all "shills" when we bring up the fact that it's already a scientifically observed reality outside of this event.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 06:59 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus


I have seen those in the United States many times. If you do an image search for double headed daisies it returns many non-Fukishima results. Not saying that the ones in the Original Post are not irradiated but I am not saying they are either.

Party pooper. How dare you look for alternative explanations.

It would be nice to know if there are enough mutations in the same area, to take it past the norm. Also, what kind of mutations. Seems like we could learn from what has happened there.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 07:02 AM
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originally posted by: Klassified

Party pooper. How dare you look for alternative explanations.


Sorry. I just remember picking these for my mom when I was a kid and thinking she would like them since they seemed so unusual to me.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 07:07 AM
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originally posted by: Klassified

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus


I have seen those in the United States many times. If you do an image search for double headed daisies it returns many non-Fukishima results. Not saying that the ones in the Original Post are not irradiated but I am not saying they are either.

Party pooper. How dare you look for alternative explanations.

It would be nice to know if there are enough mutations in the same area, to take it past the norm. Also, what kind of mutations. Seems like we could learn from what has happened there.


Theres plenty of research out there. Want a strange fact at chernoyble best thing to happen was the nuclear disaster. Caused plant and animal life to thrive in that area. You would be surprised how well nature does without us. Humans we just tend to get in the way. It's now a wildlife refuge all because humans won't go there.
edit on 7/23/15 by dragonridr because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 07:21 AM
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originally posted by: dragonridr

originally posted by: Klassified

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus


I have seen those in the United States many times. If you do an image search for double headed daisies it returns many non-Fukishima results. Not saying that the ones in the Original Post are not irradiated but I am not saying they are either.

Party pooper. How dare you look for alternative explanations.

It would be nice to know if there are enough mutations in the same area, to take it past the norm. Also, what kind of mutations. Seems like we could learn from what has happened there.


Theres plenty of research out there. Want a strange fact at chernoyble best thing to happen was the nuclear disaster. Caused plant and animal life to thrive in that area. You would be surprised how well nature does without us. Humans we just tend to get in the way. It's now a wildlife refuge all because humans won't go there.

Lol. For some reason, I'm not surprised.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 08:22 AM
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Hi.

Welcome, and thanks .

I wont jump on the 'its a normal deformity' arguement like many others ... because wd seem to me, that its not merely the fact that the abnormalities exist .. but the ratio of them, that would suggest if its likely related to local radiation or not ... so would be better to get a more accurate idea of that, before making an assertion ...

of course its normal to see what we could class as defect or abnormalities in nature .. and would seem random to us ..
but if say an arbitrary 70% of your garden looked that funky .. youd have to question it ..

as of yet, ive never seen one flower look that funky in my life .. .. never mind a cluster of daisies ... so if i did .. and it was in a known radioactive region .. i think id be swaying to attributing it to the radiation .. than telling you its completely normal and to ignore the radiation aspect as playing any part ...
of course i have seen many abnormalities in nature .. im not blind .. just havent come across many that look quite so twisted as those .. perhaps cos im not prone to visiting radioactive sites


anyhoo .. look forward to more threads from ya
edit on 23-7-2015 by Segenam because: editing is a great way to pass the time ...



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 08:49 AM
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originally posted by: wacco
a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

I remember the fibbonacci sequence in nature, and this isnt it =)


I would reckon that the thing to do would be to plant normal specimens in the area, plant other normal specimens using the same soil, then observe them.



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 08:55 AM
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a reply to: smurfy

There's normal flowers right next to the deformed ones, from the same plant..


edit on 23/7/15 by Chadwickus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 23 2015 @ 09:13 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus


I have seen those in the United States many times. If you do an image search for double headed daisies it returns many non-Fukishima results. Not saying that the ones in the Original Post are not irradiated but I am not saying they are either.


I watched a documentary about the fish at Daiichi. Some very nasty mutations were taking place. I wonder if your U.S daisies appear as just a single mutation in one flower or groups of them like the picture the OP has included?

I am convinced that mutation is a driving force in evolution. If it is a mutation for the better then the mutation will obviously thrive as it has a stronger chance of survival than its competitors/ peers. Blonde hair in humans may have come about by mutation. Being so rare women/men may have found it more attractive and thus we have our blonde haired people.

Lol, I wonder if these mutated daisies are the fittest of the fittest and will take over the daisy kingdom? Not too sure about that.


If there is a whole load of them growing, with similar mutations in other flora and fauna it would be pretty obvious. The authorities in Japan are very cagey about this whole issue. Information is not volunteered casually.

Could it be that there is just enough background radiation on the earth naturally as a result of solar storms and certain atmospheric conditions to cause mutations sometimes? Might that even be the reason we have evolved? I think it has a part to play in terms of the origin of species.
edit on 23-7-2015 by Revolution9 because: (no reason given)







 
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