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Patents and DoD

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posted on May, 16 2015 @ 02:35 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Perhaps if you have suspicion that your idea/patent might be attractive, treat it like a chef would a secret recipe -- leave a key ingredient out, one only you would know to make it work.

Can't tell you how many times a recipe I've tried has something intentionally left out (salt for example).




posted on May, 16 2015 @ 10:04 AM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

I'm not sure that would save you - you end up being told you can't market or disclose your patent to anyone under some pretty draconian penalties.

eta: well, unless they decide your gizmo is worth producing, and can find someone who is cleared enough and interested in licensing it from you. In practice, a really good idea will go that way. It's not that they don't want it produced, they just want to be the only ones with it.

edit on 16-5-2015 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2015 @ 11:58 AM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom
a reply to: Bedlam

Perhaps if you have suspicion that your idea/patent might be attractive, treat it like a chef would a secret recipe -- leave a key ingredient out, one only you would know to make it work.


Tommy bearden said, he didn't put it all there in his patent. Don't know what the dude is upto now a days



posted on May, 16 2015 @ 12:09 PM
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Or, you could do what I did, that is, first file a provisional patent, then post it on the internet and notify several large companies which would have an interest in it. This can easily be done before the feds realize what you have.

It worked for me, my Synthetic Tornado patent (US patent # 8887745) was issued and can be viewed by the public.

www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 16-5-2015 by graysquirrel because: grammer



posted on May, 16 2015 @ 06:52 PM
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originally posted by: Nochzwei

originally posted by: MystikMushroom
a reply to: Bedlam

Perhaps if you have suspicion that your idea/patent might be attractive, treat it like a chef would a secret recipe -- leave a key ingredient out, one only you would know to make it work.


Tommy bearden said, he didn't put it all there in his patent. Don't know what the dude is upto now a days


It actually has to be something that is in the national interest, useful and likely to work. Three attributes Bearden's ideas lack.

If you're talking about MEG, he said that after no one could replicate it. And no one will, because it doesn't work.



posted on May, 16 2015 @ 11:28 PM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: Nochzwei

originally posted by: MystikMushroom
a reply to: Bedlam

Perhaps if you have suspicion that your idea/patent might be attractive, treat it like a chef would a secret recipe -- leave a key ingredient out, one only you would know to make it work.


Tommy bearden said, he didn't put it all there in his patent. Don't know what the dude is upto now a days


It actually has to be something that is in the national interest, useful and likely to work. Three attributes Bearden's ideas lack.

If you're talking about MEG, he said that after no one could replicate it. And no one will, because it doesn't work.
Tommy couldn't have secured a patent just for an idea. His MEG should have industrial applicability to be worthy of a patent, according to patent laws anyway.



posted on May, 16 2015 @ 11:36 PM
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Even if you spread your idea around after a provisional patent, couldn't the DIA just scrub all information about it off the net once they clap down on it? Sure, some people might remember it, but without any verifiable documentation, it technically wouldn't "exist" to anyone anymore...



posted on May, 17 2015 @ 12:45 AM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

In this Synthetic Tornado case, It's even easer. The Feds only have to clamp down on the small number of companies who actually verify the technology and keep it out of the MSM. The reality is that, unless the masses hear it from the MSM they will assume it's a hoax.



posted on May, 17 2015 @ 12:48 AM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom
Even if you spread your idea around after a provisional patent, couldn't the DIA just scrub all information about it off the net once they clap down on it? Sure, some people might remember it, but without any verifiable documentation, it technically wouldn't "exist" to anyone anymore...


If you do that with a really hot patent, or you patent it in Europe first, you can be tossed in the slam.



posted on May, 17 2015 @ 01:44 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Right, and the thing probably is -- any hot patent like you described would be obscure to the general masses, so when you got locked up no one would care.

"What are you in for? Embezzlement? Murder? Terrorism?"

"Nah, I developed a kind spectrometer that the military industrial complex wanted..."






posted on May, 17 2015 @ 02:38 AM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom
Even if you spread your idea around after a provisional patent, couldn't the DIA just scrub all information about it off the net once they clap down on it? Sure, some people might remember it, but without any verifiable documentation, it technically wouldn't "exist" to anyone anymore...
This scenario is quite likely and this process may not be entirely of this earth, imo.



posted on May, 17 2015 @ 04:22 AM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

If you use a patent lawyer, they'll get one look at a nuke app and tell you you had better not file in another country first. Bad Things Happen.

OTOH, it's a great way to get your marketing done for free if it's a good invention.



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 12:41 AM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom
a reply to: Bedlam

Perhaps if you have suspicion that your idea/patent might be attractive, treat it like a chef would a secret recipe -- leave a key ingredient out, one only you would know to make it work.


I believe that's actually illegal.



Under the patent law in the United States, the patent specification must be complete enough so that a person of "ordinary skill in the art" of the invention can make and use the invention without “undue experimentation". There is no precise definition of "undue experimentation". The standard is determined based on the art of the invention.



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 07:50 AM
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No using someone's invention would be illegal, unless you have a license agreement with the inventor.
a reply to: mbkennel



posted on May, 18 2015 @ 05:38 PM
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a reply to: mbkennel

Sure you could present it "complete enough" -- have it so that whoever tried to replicate it wouldn't get the same efficiency, making it "workable" but overall useless.

You can make a loaf of bread without salt, but it won't taste as good as with salt.







 
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