It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Ghost gun manufacturer machine

page: 1
3

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 24 2015 @ 10:13 PM
link   


This is something very very useful for gun enthusiast who want to create their own weapons. It could pun gun smiths out of business one day.




posted on Apr, 24 2015 @ 10:16 PM
link   
a reply to: yuppa

Video link broken



posted on Apr, 24 2015 @ 11:03 PM
link   
The comments for this video on the Tube ranged from the government purchasing all these available to the information that ATF monitors all sales in stores selling items that are flagged.

Not owning a gun and vacillating on whether having one is even a good idea I found that information very interesting.



posted on Apr, 24 2015 @ 11:21 PM
link   
a reply to: Kapusta

good link (so far)
www.youtube.com...



posted on Apr, 25 2015 @ 12:17 AM
link   

originally posted by: WillLik
a reply to: Kapusta

good link (so far)


www.youtube.com...


ty sir



posted on Apr, 25 2015 @ 02:12 AM
link   
Embedded. I hope ?!




posted on Apr, 25 2015 @ 11:09 AM
link   
Than you for fixing the link. I swear the youtube tags need to be fixed. As for the ATF buying all of these its just a stop gap and eventually people will call in orders and get on the waiting list and might take you a while but youd get one. MAking personal weapons does not require registering of the weapon and thats why they are so against this.



posted on Apr, 25 2015 @ 11:48 AM
link   
While interesting, this machine is not going to replace gunsmiths any time soon. All this machine does can be done by anybody with a drill press or even a hand drill provided enough time/determination. And the Ghost Gunner is only good for the AR-15 receiver. Somebody is still going to have to install the rest of the parts, check clearances and headspace, and do repair work for existing guns.



posted on Apr, 25 2015 @ 12:35 PM
link   

originally posted by: thov420
While interesting, this machine is not going to replace gunsmiths any time soon. All this machine does can be done by anybody with a drill press or even a hand drill provided enough time/determination. And the Ghost Gunner is only good for the AR-15 receiver. Somebody is still going to have to install the rest of the parts, check clearances and headspace, and do repair work for existing guns.


FOR NOW. it can only do AR-15 receivers. there is no real restriction for future expansions really. All the parts are open source and as such can be RESIZED with soem CAD and the money to produce them.



posted on Apr, 25 2015 @ 12:49 PM
link   
Anybody who's mechanically inclined can do the same thing with a table-top mill.

It's just a table-top CNC which is cool but definitely not a game-changer. They already exist but they're typically at a higher price point and they don't come pre-programmed... but that part is easy for anyone with basic knowledge of the software.

3D printers haven't threatened any product manufacturers and this nifty device won't either.

$1000 for a 3-axis table-top CNC mill is pretty awesome. I will probably buy one.
edit on 4/25/2015 by Answer because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2015 @ 12:52 PM
link   

originally posted by: yuppa

originally posted by: thov420
While interesting, this machine is not going to replace gunsmiths any time soon. All this machine does can be done by anybody with a drill press or even a hand drill provided enough time/determination. And the Ghost Gunner is only good for the AR-15 receiver. Somebody is still going to have to install the rest of the parts, check clearances and headspace, and do repair work for existing guns.


FOR NOW. it can only do AR-15 receivers. there is no real restriction for future expansions really. All the parts are open source and as such can be RESIZED with soem CAD and the money to produce them.


It will do whatever someone programs it to do, just like any other CNC machine. It sounds like they just set it up at the factory to finish 80% AR receivers.

Someone who knows how to build a model and run the software can use this machine to manufacture most firearm receivers... or any other small item that is machined from metal/plastic.

From their website:
Ghost Gunner is a general purpose CNC mill, built upon a large body of open source work, including the gshield 3 axis motion hardware, the grbl g-code parser and motion controller, and popular microcontrollers. All Ghost Gunner schematics and design files will be published into the public domain, and anyone can program anything for the machine.
edit on 4/25/2015 by Answer because: (no reason given)

edit on 4/25/2015 by Answer because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 25 2015 @ 02:36 PM
link   
Geez. I can make deadly spears out of all the sticks in my yard. Hey feds come remove all my sticks, my wife's been on me about it for weeks. Thanks



posted on Apr, 26 2015 @ 01:45 AM
link   
a reply to: yuppa

You're right and I guess I should have been more forward thinking. Going off what Answer said, $1k tabletop CNC machine is awesome, and open source is even better. At the same time though, this machine only does about 25% of the total work to actually end up with a working firearm. You still need to have or buy a part kit to build a gun. I've never built an AR but it looks super simple from that vid and others I've watched. My AK was way more involved.

My main point of contention I guess would be the reduced need for gunsmiths, which would actually make sense in a way. People who can and do work on their own cars reduce the business of repair shops. But conversely, more people end up knowing how to fix cars which I see as a benefit to society as a whole. No matter what, there are always going to be those that would rather pay somebody to do something than learn to do it themselves.



posted on Apr, 26 2015 @ 09:50 AM
link   

originally posted by: thov420
a reply to: yuppa

You're right and I guess I should have been more forward thinking. Going off what Answer said, $1k tabletop CNC machine is awesome, and open source is even better. At the same time though, this machine only does about 25% of the total work to actually end up with a working firearm. You still need to have or buy a part kit to build a gun. I've never built an AR but it looks super simple from that vid and others I've watched. My AK was way more involved.

My main point of contention I guess would be the reduced need for gunsmiths, which would actually make sense in a way. People who can and do work on their own cars reduce the business of repair shops. But conversely, more people end up knowing how to fix cars which I see as a benefit to society as a whole. No matter what, there are always going to be those that would rather pay somebody to do something than learn to do it themselves.


Anyone who simply finishes an 80% lower and puts together an AR15 isn't a real gunsmith anyway... they're a parts assemlber.


There are plenty of guys in the industry who call themselves a gunsmith and all they do is slap together a bunch of pre-made AR15 parts. Any monkey with a few wrenches can do that.



posted on Apr, 28 2015 @ 04:24 AM
link   
It would be neat if they could come up with a MIG printer to print a metal rough (works like plastic printer, but with welding rods in an oxygen-free working chamber), and then use a desktop CNC machine like this to do most of the finishing work. (Milling only from solid blanks might have some limitations and may be a bit expensive in waste for larger pieces.) Not just guns, but all kinds of metal things could be fabricated. Wouldn't it be cool to be able to print out stuff like gearsets or engine parts?

Of course these guys are focused on guns and include template files with their automated mill because that causes drama and will get them the most attention.



posted on Apr, 28 2015 @ 01:37 PM
link   

originally posted by: pauljs75


Of course these guys are focused on guns and include template files with their automated mill because that causes drama and will get them the most attention.


Eh, not exactly.

They're marketing it that way because there are very few people who are interested in a CNC mill for their home.

Hobbyists and inventors can have one-off parts made at their local machine shop for fairly cheap depending on the complexity.

The ATF recently issued a ruling that states: "Any machine shop that uses their equipment to finish an 80% firearm receiver OR allows a customer to utilize their equipment to finish the receiver is engaged in the business of firearm manufacturing and must be licensed."

Previously, folks were buying 80% receivers and taking them to their local machine shop to be completed. Now, unless the shop is a licensed manufacturer, that would be illegal. So the people finishing 80% receivers for their own use must do so with their own equipment. Hence: the need for a cheap at-home, pre-programmed CNC mill is born.
edit on 4/28/2015 by Answer because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
3

log in

join