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Where are (all) the Photos of Ceres?

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posted on May, 10 2015 @ 03:46 AM
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originally posted by: 4Vesta
It's worth saving copies as sometimes the catalog entries disappear. For example PIA19336 and PIA19337 noted here have been removed.

I was puzzled at this at first too, but then I had a look at the page with the latest Ceres images: photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov... and those catalog entries are still there, they just have been renamed PIA19536 and PIA19537 respectively. No idea why, perhaps they consider it a new stage in Dawn's Ceres mission, and gave those images new set of numbers to match that.




posted on May, 11 2015 @ 09:43 AM
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The new animated sequence of images of Ceres, taken on May 4th is now available. My first impression is that the bright spots are still unresolved, even at the improved resolution of 1300 meters per pixel.
The bright spots are blocky in appearance, which we associate with digital images that are poorly resolved. It will be useful to examine the still images in this sequence, when they become available. Link to the animated sequence, below:
photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov...
edit on 11-5-2015 by Ross 54 because: improved paragraph structure.



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: Ross 54

Dawn is still at a relatively high-altitude orbit, and it will be for the next few months. We may need to wait for one of the low-altitude orbits to get very high resolution images, which won't be until later this year. Dawn does not reach its lowest orbit until December (The LAMO orbit of 230 miles)

That lowest orbit will be 40 times closer than Dawn is now, and about 10 times closer than Dawn will be in June. However, the HAMO orbit of 900 miles will probably also yield some great hi-res images (hopefully hi-res enough to resolve the bright spots with clear detail). That HAMO orbit will begin in August.


Source:
Dawn Journal - March 31, 2015





edit on 5/11/2015 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

"Note: colors of the orbits here are only approximate."






posted on May, 11 2015 @ 02:29 PM
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The largest image of multiple bright spots


www.jpl.nasa.gov...


ALL i have to say is COME ON!!! this is getting more intriguing by the minute. My voice of wonder screams intelligent design and my voice of reason screams ice...



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 02:41 PM
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Looking further at one of the new images, under magnification, it appears that the bright spot to the side of the crater is a rather regular-looking long rectangle. The one at the center of the crater looks like a square. It has three right-angled corners. The forth corner appears to be lopped off at a 30 to 45 degree angle. The sides of the square and the rectangle seem to be aligned, or nearly aligned with one another.



posted on May, 11 2015 @ 03:56 PM
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originally posted by: Ross 54
Looking further at one of the new images, under magnification, it appears that the bright spot to the side of the crater is a rather regular-looking long rectangle. The one at the center of the crater looks like a square. It has three right-angled corners. The forth corner appears to be lopped off at a 30 to 45 degree angle. The sides of the square and the rectangle seem to be aligned, or nearly aligned with one another.


Are you looking at the raw file, or are you looking at a smoothed-out version?

If you are looking at the raw TIFF file, then you would see that the pixelization could be what is causing the regular shapes that you see. Some versions of the image online are files artificially smoothed out, and thus the large-sized pixel nature of the image cannot be seen.

Here is what the raw TIFF file looks like (this is not the actual image, because ATS images does not support TIFF).



Here is a link to the actual TIFF file:
photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov...

And a page on which links to the TIFF and the JPEG could be found:
www.jpl.nasa.gov...


Some of the smoothed images online look just as rectangular and regular, but the pixeled nature of that regularity is lost in the artificial smoothing:



The smoothing is not creating additional detail, but rather just artificially smoothing out the large pixels, making it seem as if the pixels are not a factor in the apparent regularity. Perhaps it really is that regular, and it isn't just the pixels. However, at this point, the resolution is not fine enough to determine whether the spots really are that regular and rectangular, or if it is just an artifact of the large pixels.



posted on May, 21 2015 @ 07:43 PM
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new pictures
www.nbcnews.com...



posted on May, 22 2015 @ 04:23 AM
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We can now compare the enlarged image posted by Soylent Green with the more recent one at higher resolution:



New image with pixel resize:


with bicubic resize:


I used TIFF files, but compression artifacts (the checkerboard pattern) are still visible.



posted on May, 23 2015 @ 03:26 PM
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The industrious folk at the Unmanned Spaceflight Forum created this simulated "flyby" projection which shows a conical feature, perhaps a volcano or cryovolcano cone:




posted on Aug, 13 2016 @ 03:48 AM
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A fantastic-looking recent view of Ceres, providing a bird's eye view:


Full-sized:

It's a ctually a mosaic of two images - PIA20868 and PIA20869, looking towards the Rao Crater (7 miles or 12 kilometers wide).

Dawn took these image on May 30, 2016, from its low-altitude mapping orbit, at a distance of about 240 miles (385 kilometers) above the surface. The image resolution is 120 feet (35 meters) per pixel.




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