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The father of all humans lived 239,000 years ago

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posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

well thats cool.




posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Gene App? was there blood analysis involved? Lol now Im just curious...off to google "gene app")



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 05:11 PM
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a reply to: BlueJacket

what I really think about this common 'ancestor' is that they did not find a distinct line...
the scientists abstractly grouped the Icelanders data..... then extrapolated where and when the 'common ancestor' arose in the best-guess mode possible (which itself may not account for great leaps in 'mutations', 'adaptations, evolution...

I think they use a conservative factor in changes to the breeding population which itself is problematic because there were numberus near extinctions globally and even more regional stresses with the then dominant group of humans being so thinned out they had to migrate often....

it is a way too hard thing to pinpoint...our most recent 'common human ancestor' may have been 666,000 generations ago in the human line which gave life to the much maligned 'Lilith'


edit on th31142749451027152015 by St Udio because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 05:23 PM
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originally posted by: BlueJacket
a reply to: rickymouse

Gene App? was there blood analysis involved? Lol now Im just curious...off to google "gene app")


I got my DNA processed at Ancestry then got the Gene App stuff at Livewello. Cost about a hundred bucks to a hundred twenty total for the two. There are lots of Variance reports you can run. I got the SNPs from SNPedia and made a neanderthal app. I can't figure out the exact percentages but I definitely did see some neanderthal and since I am mostly Finn, and Finns are pretty much the same, I think it should be a three or four percent. I'm not sure exactly what that three or four means though, just that I share some genetics with neandarthals I guess. It would be nice if I could get the exact percentages, but I am cheap and spending more money is not what I want to do to find out exactly.

I've ran a lot of apps on Livewello and done a lot of research on their site and other related genetic sites. It's actually fun.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 05:31 PM
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a reply to: yuppa

There is a hell of a lot more to it than you are saying. Even the microbia your ancestors were associated with has a lot of influence on genetic traits. Neanderthal genetics are in a lot of us, they were not homosapiens. Cromagnum genetics are in some people too.

Where do you think HomoSapians came from, they probably slowly mutated from another Hominid or combination of a few different ones. We didn't just appear here on earth. We did not evolve from a monkey why the other hominids evolved from something else.

What makes up biological ethnicities, differences in our genetics. Different proportions of blending with other hominids is one of the differences.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: BlueJacket

There have been humanoid fossils found that are far older than 239,000 years.

www.dailymail.co.uk...

en.wikipedia.org...


This study isn't make a claim that the first male Homo sapiens could first he identifiable as a viable seperate species from its predecessor at this point in eviction art history. It's saying that based on genetic extrapolation the oldest male common ancestor of everyone currently living can be pinpointed to this timeframe. There were certainly older people dating farther back in time but you have to factor in things like the Toba event which reduced worldwide human populations to as low as 1000-10,000 breeding individuals (and had equally drastic affects on Neanderthal, Denisovan and Erectus populations) as well as other catastrophic events that would bottleneck populations worldwide and this is where they derive the "common ancestor " tag from.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 07:58 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
a reply to: yuppa

There is a hell of a lot more to it than you are saying. Even the microbia your ancestors were associated with has a lot of influence on genetic traits. Neanderthal genetics are in a lot of us, they were not homosapiens.


That's open to debate actually. Some paleo anthropologists consider them a subspecies of H. Sapiens I.e.
Homo Sapiens Neanderthalensis as opposed to a seperate taxonomic Homo Neanderthalensis



Cromagnum genetics are in some people too.


Cro Magnon isn't actually a seperate taxonomic descriptor. It is an outdated descriptor for'early modern humans if the European Upper Paleolithic' or as they're referred to currently- European Early Modern Humans. It's just a fancy way of describing the first fully modern humans in Europe.


Where do you think HomoSapians came from, they probably slowly mutated from another Hominid or combination of a few different ones. We didn't just appear here on earth. We did not evolve from a monkey why the other hominids evolved from something else.


Homo Sapiens, like Neanderthal and Denisovan are immediately preceded by Heidelbergensis. Neanderthal evolved from them in Europe approx. 500,000 years ago,
Denisovans in the same time frame diverged from Heidelbergensis in Weatern Asia and homo Sapiens is for all intents and purposes the African branch.


What makes up biological ethnicities, differences in our genetics. Different proportions of blending with other hominids is one of the differences.


To an extent but a fairly minor one. Geographic isolationism,
Genetic bottleneck events and genetic drift play a much larger role.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 08:56 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
a reply to: yuppa

There is a hell of a lot more to it than you are saying. Even the microbia your ancestors were associated with has a lot of influence on genetic traits. Neanderthal genetics are in a lot of us, they were not homosapiens. Cromagnum genetics are in some people too.

Where do you think HomoSapians came from, they probably slowly mutated from another Hominid or combination of a few different ones. We didn't just appear here on earth. We did not evolve from a monkey why the other hominids evolved from something else.

What makes up biological ethnicities, differences in our genetics. Different proportions of blending with other hominids is one of the differences.



There are no MODERN DIFFERENT RACES IS THE POINT i was getting at.
Ethnicities yes,races nope.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 09:30 PM
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a reply to: yuppa

Correct. There is nobody left but Homo Sapiens Sapiens. C'est finis



posted on Mar, 28 2015 @ 01:16 AM
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The differences in humans today are explained pretty good.

around 2 million years ago, archaic hominids from africa split up and the first wave that migrated out of africa branched out into homo neanderthal and homo denisovan etc, these populations lived isolated from each other long enough to become a sub species of human, but the times where they interacted with each other, they also bred and produced hybrid homonids.

by the time modern man migrated from africa there were several sub species of homonids that interbred with each other, and modern man is not the same homo sapiens that migrated out of africa, it has become a hybrid of all sub species of homo.
that´s why we all have neanderthal genes, and that´s why we all have the same genetic make up. the ethnicities existing today, are nothing more then evidence of the evolutionary differences that evolved separately and are now part of every single human alive today.



posted on Mar, 28 2015 @ 09:40 AM
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originally posted by: Chrisfishenstein
a reply to: enlightenedservant


Nice info though. I love reading about the discoveries involving our origins. I've been telling everyone that we're literally all cousins, and stuff like this just reinforces that belief.


Discovery? Of what exactly? Another guesstimate with a vague timeline of more vague answers with vague information? Um...It is between 1 and 500,000 years old! Believe me, I am telling you!!! Some people believe all kinds of garbage spoon fed into their brains....


Eh, although we should always be skeptical of all info, science isn't just "garbage" if conducted properly.



posted on Mar, 28 2015 @ 08:21 PM
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a reply to: peter vlar

I appreciate your input



posted on Mar, 28 2015 @ 09:24 PM
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A better phrasing for the headline would be "The father of all humans alive today lived 239,000 years ago," it removes ambiguity.



posted on Mar, 28 2015 @ 10:28 PM
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there's also a chance the first human to set foot on this planet was an et creation, no one has said same hasnt happened over the known universe, advanced beings might like to try differnet body types from time to time for educational purposes ,how would we know anything about what aliens in space have done throughout history



posted on Mar, 29 2015 @ 04:09 AM
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originally posted by: Chrisfishenstein
a reply to: enlightenedservant


Nice info though. I love reading about the discoveries involving our origins. I've been telling everyone that we're literally all cousins, and stuff like this just reinforces that belief.


Discovery? Of what exactly? Another guesstimate with a vague timeline of more vague answers with vague information? Um...It is between 1 and 500,000 years old! Believe me, I am telling you!!! Some people believe all kinds of garbage spoon fed into their brains....


You should probably read the linked article. And by the way, a "discovery" doesn't mean it's something that's vitally important. I can "discover" that okra & cherry pie don't go well together, especially as a new ice cream flavor. That's still a new discovery.



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