SimonGray or Pixy help me out here.

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posted on Dec, 19 2004 @ 03:09 PM
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I know youre both from the UK and you maybe know that I'm an american living in the UK. But I just have a quick question. Whats up with the long lasting non-refriderated milk? I just got a carton of milk that can last until April. Anyone know the science behind this?




posted on Dec, 19 2004 @ 03:16 PM
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UHT (Ultra High Temperature) milk is available in most of civilization, not just the UK...

www.foodsci.uoguelph.ca...



posted on Dec, 19 2004 @ 06:13 PM
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Excused my ingnorance but I never heard of that type of milk before, where can I get some here in the US?



posted on Dec, 19 2004 @ 10:17 PM
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I know there's a soy milk that comes in a carton and you dont have to refrigerate it. Its in the natural foods section.
Doesnt taste very good..bought it once..:shk:



posted on Dec, 19 2004 @ 10:22 PM
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Well I was wondering about the flavour of it, something like that most not be very good at all when it comes to taste, I am with fat free low carb milk.



posted on Dec, 20 2004 @ 02:49 PM
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UHT milk tastes like milk.

People who like their stuff fresh and unprocessed have an aversion to it but not for taste.

Plankton-enriched UHT milk (with extra calcium) is the dairy food of choice in your post-holocaust future.



posted on Dec, 20 2004 @ 04:53 PM
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Originally posted by MaskedAvatar
UHT milk tastes like milk.

People who like their stuff fresh and unprocessed have an aversion to it but not for taste.

Plankton-enriched UHT milk (with extra calcium) is the dairy food of choice in your post-holocaust future.


That is funny but I am stocking on powder milk. Hey where can I find some of that milk? I will like to taste it.



posted on Dec, 20 2004 @ 07:36 PM
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Actually, I never drink milk. I sometimes use it when I'm making an omlette or a cake but thats about all.

I have no idea exactly how it is kept for so long, but personally I prefer full cream milk for cooking purposes anyway so never use this long lasting stuff.



posted on Dec, 21 2004 @ 09:46 AM
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Originally posted by marg6043
Excused my ingnorance but I never heard of that type of milk before, where can I get some here in the US?



Parmalat sells it in the US; check at your grocer's, on the baking supplies aisle.



posted on Dec, 21 2004 @ 09:50 AM
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Thanks, sandge, I will be looking for it on my next trip to the market.



posted on Dec, 21 2004 @ 10:23 AM
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Electricity Key to Fresh-tasting, Long-lasting Milk
Promising New Technology Treats Milk at Ultra-High Temperatures

Thanks to research funded by America's dairy farmers, electricity moves beyond its initial intent of providing a well-lit home or milking parlor to help create an ultra-high temperature (UHT) milk with a fresh, appealing taste.
Existing commercial methods for UHT treaTMent of milk create "cooked" flavor notes that can detract from the fresh taste. But researchers at the Western Dairy Center at Utah State University in Logan, Utah, in a project managed by Dairy Management Inc.TM (DMI), are using electricity to look at a promising new process for ultra-high temperature milk processing.

By passing electrical current directly through pasteurized milk, the milk is flash-heated to destroy virtually all bacteria present. This improved technology delivers a more appealing, fresher-tasting milk with an extended shelf life.

The secret of the new technology, known as electroheating and developed by Raztek Corporation in Sunnyvale, Calif., is a fast, direct heat application.
"By passing an electrical current directly through the milk itself, we are able to reach UHT levels in a fraction of a second, rather than minutes," says McMahon. "This quicker heating process is the key to producing a fresher-tasting milk product."



www.extraordinarydairy.com..." target="_blank" class="postlink" rel="nofollow">www.extraordinarydairy.com...



[edit on 21-12-2004 by Horus_Re]





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