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Have you heard "The Hum" and what is it?

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posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 03:13 AM
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originally posted by: nerbot
a reply to: jonwhite866

I doubt it's ET.

Follow the sound and you will possibly come across an industrial pump or something similar.



I live in Wisconsin around a bunch of cranberry marshes. I use to live in the city but moved out to a rural area. On cool nights I use to hear a faint hum or drone sound and thought it was really strange. I latter found out the sound was from 5 big diesel engines used to pump water for a sprinkler system on a cranberry marsh about 1/2 mile away. I also used to hear a strange hum at my grandmothers house, and found out it was from the sound of cars on an interstate road near by.


SO yeah these sounds can be from many different things.




posted on Apr, 16 2015 @ 09:24 PM
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From today's 'Independent' (British broadsheet newspaper).



Have you heard 'the hum'? Mystery of Earth's low droning noise could now be solved


However, the search for the truth could now be over as researchers claim that microseismic activity from long ocean waves impacting the sea bed is what makes our planet vibrate and produces the droning sound.

The pressure of the waves on the seafloor generates seismic waves that cause the Earth to oscillate, said Fabrice Ardhuin, a senior research scientist at Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in France.

The continuous waves produce sounds lasting from 13 to 300 seconds. They can be heard by a relatively small proportion of people – who are sensitive to the hums – and also by seismic instruments.

“We have made a big step in explaining this mysterious signal and where it is coming from and what is the mechanism,” Ardhuin said of the study published in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union..


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posted on Apr, 16 2015 @ 10:31 PM
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originally posted by: defiythelie
I use to live in the city but moved out to a rural area. On cool nights I use to hear a faint hum or drone sound and thought it was really strange. I latter found out the sound was from 5 big diesel engines used to pump water for a sprinkler system on a cranberry marsh about 1/2 mile away.
Where i used to live was also somewhat rural and I heard a low-pitched throbbing or pulsating sound that seemed like it could have been a pumping operation of some sort.

One night I decided I'd try to follow the sound to the source, but determining the direction of low frequency sound is nearly impossible, so I couldn't figure out the direction. It was too quiet to hear over the noise my car made and there weren't that many roads, so I never found it, but I suspect it was something similar to what you found, probably a pumping operation. I never heard it anywhere else I lived so it was definitely regional in origin.

a reply to: karl 12
Thanks for the interesting link. That may explain the hum some people hear, but probably not the hum I heard which only happened at one of my previous addresses.

Also that's one way the Earth can make a humming sound, but there are others too, like this one:

Booming Sands

At roughly 30 locations around the world, sand dunes seem to sing, producing haunting and baffling sounds....
Now, engineers Melany Hunt and Christopher Brennen of the California Institute of Technology are on the case. Their theory is that the booming sand dunes act like enormous musical instruments.
It's possible that there are other, as yet undiscovered sources where wind or water interacting with the Earth can make humming sounds.



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